B&WLogo_circle&text

 

 

 

 

BRIEFING PAPERS

FOR ELECTED MEMBERS’

BRIEFING SESSION

 

Draft Only

 

 

 

 

 

to be held at

the Council Chambers

Civic Centre

on 23 February, 2016 commencing at 6.00pm


PROCEDURE FOR FULL COUNCIL BRIEFING

PRINCIPLES

A Council Briefing occurs a week prior to the Ordinary Council Meeting and provides an opportunity for Elected Members to ask questions and clarify issues relevant to the specific agenda items before council.  The briefing is not a decision-making forum and the Council has no power to make decisions.  The briefing session will not be used, except in an emergency, as a venue or forum through which to invoke the requirements of the Local Government Act 1995 and call a special meeting of Council.

 

In order to ensure full transparency the meetings will be open to the public to observe the process.  Where matters are of a confidential nature, they will be deferred to the conclusion of the briefing and at that point, the briefing session closed to the public.  The reports provided are the Officers’ professional opinions.  While it is acknowledged that Elected Members may raise issues that have not been considered in the formulation of the report and recommendation, it is a basic principle that as part of the briefing sessions Elected Members cannot direct Officers to change their reports or recommendations.

 

PROCESS

The briefing session will commence at 6.00 pm and will be chaired by the Mayor or in his/her absence the Deputy Mayor.  In the absence of both, Councillors will elect a chairperson from amongst those present.  In general, Standing Orders will apply, EXCEPT THAT Elected Members may speak more than once on any item, there is no moving or seconding items, Officers will address the Elected Members and the order of business will be as follows:-

 

Members of the public present may observe the process and there is an opportunity at the conclusion of the briefing for a public question time where members of the public may ask questions (no statements) relating only to the business on the agenda.   The agenda will take the form of:

Ø  Attendance and Apologies

Ø  Declarations of Interest

Ø  Reports for discussion

Ø  Tabled Items

Ø  Public Question Time

Ø  Closure

 

Where an interest is involved in relation to an item, the same procedure which applies to Ordinary Council meetings will apply.  It is a breach of the City’s Code of Conduct for an interest to not be declared.  The briefing session will consider items on the agenda only and proceed to deal with each item as they appear.  The process will be for the Mayor to call each item number in sequence and ask for questions.  Where there are no questions regarding the item, the briefing will proceed to the next item.

 

AGENDA CONTENTS

While every endeavour is made to ensure that all items to be presented to Council at the Ordinary Council Meeting are included in the briefing papers, it should be noted that there will be occasions when, due to necessity, items will not be ready in time for the briefing session and will go straight to the Full Council agenda as a matter for decision.  Further, there will be occasions when items are TABLED at the briefing rather than the full report being provided in advance.  In these instances, staff will endeavour to include the item on the agenda as a late item, noting that a report will be tabled at the agenda briefing session.

 

AGENDA DISTRIBUTION

The Council Briefing agenda will be distributed to Elected Members on the FRIDAY prior to the Council Briefing session.  Copies will be made available to the libraries and the Internet for interested members of the public.  Spare briefing papers will be available at the briefing session for interested members of the public.

 

DEPUTATIONS

Deputations will generally not be heard prior to the Council Briefing session and are reserved for prior to the Ordinary Council meeting.

 

RECORD OF BRIEFING

The formal record of the Council Briefing session will be limited to notes regarding any agreed action to be taken by staff or Elected Members.  No recommendations will be included and the notes will be retained for reference and are not distributed to Elected Members or the public. 

 

LOCATION

The Council Briefing session will take place in the Council Chamber in the Civic Centre.


 

 

 

Briefing Papers for Tuesday 23 February, 2016

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Item  1_____ Attendances_ 1

Item  2_____ Apologies and Leave of Absence_ 1

Item  3_____ Reports_ 1

Planning & Sustainability  1

City Growth  1

3.1                         Adoption of Proposed Amendment to Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation for Advertising  1

3.2                         Adoption of Local Heritage Survey, Draft LPP 4.12 and proposed scheme heritage list. 5

3.3                         Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy  12

Approval Services  16

3.4                         Amendment No. 152 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 - Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo  16

3.5                         Consideration of Development Application (DA2015/1164) Existing Additions to a Single House (Patio, Retaining Walls, Shed and Carport) at 6 Moran Court, Wanneroo  22

3.6                         SAT Reconsideration of Development Application (DA2014/186) Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) at Lot 121 (288) Carabooda Road, Carabooda  27

3.7                         Application for Intensive Agriculture (Mushroom Farm) at Lot 1 (163) Belgrade Road, Wanneroo  35

3.8                         Proposed Amendment No. 25 to Agreed Structure Plan No 1 (Cell 3) – Increase in retail net lettable area from 1,900m2 to 4,300m2  43

3.9                         Proposed Amendment No. 23 to the East Wanneroo Cell 1 Agreed Structure Plan No. 3  51

3.10                      Adoption of Amendment No. 5 to the Agreed Structure Plan No. 60  57

3.11                      Consideration of Development Application (DA2015/1794) - Home Business - Category 3 at 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale  62

Assets  67

Asset Operations & Services  67

3.12                      PT04-11/14 - Sandison Way, Landsdale, Road Network Analysis  67

Infrastructure Capital Works  71

3.13                      PT02-10/15 - Erect a Permanent Solid Wall along the Newly Realigned Lenore Road between East Road and Nicholas Road, Hocking  71

3.14                      Marathon Loop/Gnangara Road Madeley - Vehicle Accessibility - Community Consultation Assessment  79

Community & Place  84

Cultural Development  84

3.15                      Appointment of an artist, Tony Pankiw, for the Pearsall Hocking Community Centre Public Artwork  84

Community Facilities  87

3.16                      City of Wanneroo Tennis Court Free Use Trial  87

3.17                      Passive Park Upgrade - Development of Stage 1 and 2 - Salitage Park, Pearsall  94

3.18                      Yanchep Active Open Space Sports Amenities Building  100

3.19                      Project Status and Update - Project Number PR-2477 Coastal Risk Assessments  104

3.20                      Deed of Agreement - Maintenance of Turf Cricket Wickets at Kingsway Regional Sporting Complex  107

Corporate Strategy & Performance  111

Business & Finance  111

3.21                      2015/16 Mid Year Review of Annual Budget  111

3.22                      Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 31 December 2015  119

3.23                      Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 31 January 2016  129

Strategic & Business Planning  140

3.24                      Three-Year Strategic Internal Audit Plan  140

3.25                      Mid-Year Review of Corporate Business Plan Progress 2014/15  142

People & Culture  149

3.26                      Payments to Employees in Addition to Contract or Award Council Policy  149

Transactional Finance  152

3.27                      Warrant of Payments for the Period to 31 January 2016  152

Council & Corporate Support  216

3.28                      Consideration of Motions Presented at the Annual General Meeting of Electors  216

3.29                      Donations to be Considered by Council - March 2016  223

Chief Executive Office  228

Office of the CEO Reports  228

3.30                      Donation for the Waroona and District Fires Appeal 2016  228

Advocacy & Economic Development  230

3.31                      Entry Statement Signage Design  230

3.32                      Draft Economic Development Strategy  235

3.33                      Co-Working Space Trial - Enterprise House  242

Governance & Legal  247

3.34                      Compliance Audit Return 2015  247

3.35                      Proposed New Dogs Local Law 2016  251

3.36                      Proposed New Cat Local Law 2016  255

3.37                      Proposed New Bee Keeping Local Law 2016  259

3.38                      Proposed New Site Erosion and Sand Drift Prevention Local Law 2016  263

3.39                      Proposed New Fencing Local Law   268

Item  4_____ Motions on Notice_ 273

Item  5_____ Late Reports (to be circulated under separate cover) 273

Item  6_____ Public Question Time_ 273

Item  7_____ Confidential_ 273

7.1                         City of Joondalup Bulk and Green Waste Verge Collection  273

Item  8_____ Date of Next Meeting_ 273

Item  9_____ Closure_ 273

 


Agenda

 

Good evening Councillors, staff, ladies and gentlemen, we wish to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land we are meeting on, the Whadjuk people.  We would like to pay respect to the Elders of the Nyoongar nation, past and present, who have walked and cared for the land and we acknowledge and respect their continuing culture and the contributions made to the life of this city and this region and I invite you to bow your head in prayer:

 

Lord, We ask for your blessing upon our City, our community and our Council.  Guide us in our decision making to act fairly, without fear or favour and with compassion, integrity and honesty.  May we show true leadership, be inclusive of all, and guide the City of Wanneroo to a prosperous future that all may share.  We ask this in your name. Amen

Item  1      Attendances

Item  2      Apologies and Leave of Absence

Item  3      Reports

Declarations of Interest by Elected Members, including the nature and extent of the interest. Declaration of Interest forms to be completed and handed to the Chief Executive Officer.

Planning & Sustainability

City Growth

3.1    Adoption of Proposed Amendment to Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation for Advertising

File Ref:                                              3516 – 15/569117

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider adoption of a proposed amendment to Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation (LPP 3.1) for advertising

 

Background

Over the past few years the City has received a significant number of Structure Plan amendments that seek to increase residential density on undeveloped parcels of land within established suburbs in the City, particularly those in the East Wanneroo Cells 1-6. A report on this issue was presented to the 30 June 2015 Council Forum where it was noted that Administration would consider revising the criteria for appropriate higher density development in LPP 3.1 and prepare a further report for Council Forum.

 

Administration proposed draft revised criteria in LPP 3.1 and that was considered at Council Forum on 25 November 2015.

 

An LPP 3.1 which incorporates revised criteria for higher density development has now been prepared for Council consideration.

Detail

Over the past few years the City has received approximately 80 Local Structure Plan (LSP) amendments to increase residential densities within the East Wanneroo Cells. Typically the amendments seek to increase density from R20 to R40 or R20 to R60 and when advertised for public consultation, the City usually receives objections from local residents around the following issues:

 

·        Traffic generation;

·        Proximity to infrastructure and amenities;

·        Visual amenity;

·        Car parking;

·        Local school capacity; and

·        Increase in noise pollution

 

The majority of the East Wanneroo Cells are now developed with approximately 10% (171ha) of developable land remaining. The majority of the remaining undeveloped areas are coded R20. The great majority of applications for increased densities are recommended for approval because just about any location can be considered to comply with at least one of the criteria in LPP 3.1. The purpose of this amendment to LPP 3.1 is to tighten the criteria required to justify an increase in density to ensure that this type of development is appropriately located within a walkable distance of key amenities such as activity centres and public transport.

 

The existing LPP 3.1 includes very broad criteria for assessing proposals to increase housing density including:

 

1.       Easy access/close proximity to retail and employment centres;

2.       Easy access/close proximity to public transport with priority towards rail nodes and bus interchanges;

3.       Easy access/close proximity to areas of high amenity including public open space (POS) and recreational facilities; and

4.       Easy access/close proximity to major arterial routes, educational institutions (including primary, secondary and tertiary institutions), community facilities (including libraries and medical centres).

 

Administration recommends that the policy be separated into two parts, one that deals with housing precincts and one that deals with other infill development proposals outside the housing precincts. This amendment will only affect infill development proposals outside of housing precincts, with existing provisions concerned with housing precincts to remain unchanged.

 

This key change to the policy will enable Administration to introduce an adapted version of the existing Table 1 of criteria that will be utilised to assess applications for density increases that fall outside the area of a housing precinct. The new table has removed criteria 3 and 4 because they refer to access to public open space and recreational activities, major arterial routes, educational institutions and community facilities, which are not considered appropriate triggers for increased density unless a proposal is also located approximate to public transport or activity centre. This change will ensure that high density development is only permitted in appropriate locations that are within a walkable catchment of an appropriately sized activity centre or to a well serviced public transport connection. This will lessen the impact of increased development densities on the local and regional road network while better enabling the use of public transport, walking and cycling to accomplish day to day journeys.

 

In addition to the above change to LPP 3.1, Administration has made a number of minor amendments to criteria 1 and 2 that are designed to continue to allow for increased densities, but only within a walkable catchment of Activity Centres (excluding Local Centres), train stations and high frequency bus routes. Administration has also updated the formatting of the policy to improve its clarity and readability.

 

Previously, criteria 1 and 2 have been applied using a circle centred around a rail station or activity centre. The revised policy changes the way that locational criteria will be applied by utilising a walkable catchment instead. A walkable catchment measures the distance from a location along roads, rather than as the crow flies. This offers a more accurate indication of the ability for residents to walk to activity centres or public transport within an acceptable timeframe (10 minutes for 800m; 5 minutes for 400m). For comparison, a copy of the draft policy (with track changes) is available in Attachment 1, a copy of the previous version of the policy is available in Attachment 2 and a copy of the final policy is available in Attachment 3.

Consultation

In accordance with clause 4 of the deemed provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2, the draft revised LPP 3.1 will need to be advertised for public consultation.

 

Administration will publish notice of the revised policy in the Wanneroo Times for two consecutive weeks and on the City’s website advising a period of 21 days for making submissions. Administration will then prepare a report to Council on the submissions received, should Council resolve to adopt the proposed amendment to the policy, notification will be published in the Wanneroo Times.

 

Comment

 

The provision of amended criteria to guide increased residential density in established suburbs is aimed at ensuring this development occurs in appropriate locations. Currently, the policy provisions allow for density increases in almost any location in the East Wanneroo cells. The proposed new criteria have been formulated to deliver this goal by limiting density increases to locations in close proximity to activity centres, with the exception of local centres, or areas characterised by good access to public transport. The proposed new criteria will stop proposals for density increases that are purely based on proximity to public open space, community facilities such as schools and access to arterial road connections.

Statutory Compliance

In accordance with Clause 4 and 5 of the deemed provisions of DPS 2, Council may resolve to prepare and adopt a local planning policy to apply to any matter related to planning and development of the district.  A draft policy must be advertised for public comment for a period of not less than 21 days after which time it is to be reviewed in the context of any submissions received and either adopted with or without modifications or not proceeded with.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relates to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

The revised draft Local Planning Policy 3.1 will be advertised for public consultation, submissions will be considered and a final revision prepared and presented to Council for adoption.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council, pursuant to Clauses 4(1) of the deemed provisions of City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, ADOPTS the draft revised Local Planning Policy 3.1 Local Housing Strategy Implementation as contained in Attachment 3, for the purpose of advertising, and ADVERTISES it for public comment for a period 21 days by way of:

 

1.         Advertisement in one edition of the Wanneroo Times, The North Coast Times and Sun City News; and

 

2.       Display at the City’s Administration Centre Building, City Libraries and on the City’s website.

 

Attachments:

1.

Draft (tracked changes) LPP 3.1 Housing Strategy Implementation

16/52787

 

2.

Current LPP 3.1 Housing Strategy Implementation

16/50982

 

3.

Draft LPP 3.1 Housing Strategy Implementation

16/58188

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                            5

Draft

3.2    Adoption of Local Heritage Survey, Draft LPP 4.12 and proposed scheme heritage list.

File Ref:                                              2188 – 16/27955

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider the adoption of an updated Municipal Heritage Inventory (MHI), now called the Local Heritage Survey (LHS).

 

Background

The City currently has three adopted heritage documents that are used to guide decision making around places with some form of heritage significance:

 

Municipal Heritage Inventory (MHI)

 

An MHI is required to be prepared under section 45 of the Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990 (the Act) as an inventory of buildings that are, or may become, of cultural heritage significance. The MHI allocates each place a management category that clearly defines the level of heritage significance for each place

 

The City currently has 120 sites and four precincts included on the inventory, each of which has been assigned a management category according to its heritage value. These categories provide guidance to the City and the owners of the sites when considering maintenance, conservation, planning and development issues.

 

Heritage List


The City’s Heritage List is established under clause 8 of the deemed provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2) and includes those places on the MHI that are of exceptional or considerable significance. Places included on the Heritage List are provided with protection under DPS 2; and

 

Local Planning Policy 4.12 – Heritage Places (LPP 4.12)

 

LPP 4.12 provides guidance on the protection of heritage places included on the Heritage List. The Policy states that planning approval is required for any development proposal that affects a heritage place and applicants may be required to submit a heritage assessment report prepared by a suitably qualified person to a standard deemed acceptable by the Heritage Council.

 

The City’s existing MHI, Heritage List and LPP 4.12 were established in 2006 to ensure the effective management of local heritage matters. According to the Act, the MHI is required to be updated to ensure that accurate information on heritage sites is available to Administration, owners and occupiers and the general public.

 

Following a period of preliminary research and consultation with affected land owners, Administration engaged external consultants, Hocking Heritage Studios in August 2015 to undertake the audit and review of the existing MHI and prepare a new LHS, which is the title required by a new green bill and associated heritage reforms proposed by the State Government.

 

This process involved the:

 

·                Review of documentation and physical evidence for the places currently listed on the existing MHI;

·                Review of new documentation and physical evidence for places nominated for inclusion in the new LHS;

·                Allocation of a management category for all places (current and new) in accordance with the State Heritage Office Guidelines; and

·                Preparation of a new Heritage List to reflect the updated management categories of the new LHS

 

The LHS is a 414 page document, rather than include it as an attachment to this report, Administration has provided a copy of the draft LHS in the Elected Member’s reading room, provided a copy on the Hub and on the City’s website under Council > Council Meetings > Meeting Agendas and Minutes.

 

A copy of the new Heritage List is included at Attachment 1.

 

Administration has also prepared a minor amendment to LPP 4.12 in order to ensure alignment and consistency with the new LHS. A copy of the draft revised LPP 4.12 is included at Attachment 2.

Detail

Local Heritage Survey

 

An LHS is prepared to identify and record places that are or may become, of cultural heritage significance to a local government area and assist local governments in making and implementing decisions that respect cultural heritage in a consistent and accessible way.

 

This is accomplished by compiling all places of heritage significance, providing details about the reasons for its place on the LHS and allocating a management category to guide decision making for proposals that may have an impact on that heritage place. One of four management categories is allocated to each heritage place, as follows:

 

Level of Significance

Description

Desired Outcome

Management Category

Total Places in City of Wanneroo

Exceptional Significance

Essential to the heritage of the locality. Rare or outstanding example. Recommended for inclusion on the State Register of

Heritage Places

The place should be retained and conserved unless there is no feasible and prudent alternative to doing otherwise. Any alterations or extensions should reinforce the significance of the place, and be in accordance with a Conservation Plan (if one exists for the place)

1

7

Exceptional Significance

As Above

Currently included on the

State Register of Heritage

Places

1A

12

Considerable Significance

Very important to the heritage of the locality. High degree of integrity/authenticity

Conservation of the place is highly desirable. Any alterations or extensions should reinforce the significance of the place.

2

16

Some or Moderate Significance

Contributes to the heritage of the locality. Has some altered or modified elements, not necessarily detracting from the overall significance of the item.

Conservation of the place is desirable. Any alterations or extensions should reinforce the significance of the place, and original fabric should be retained wherever feasible.

3

18

Little Significance or Historic Site

Contributes to the understanding of the history of the City of Wanneroo.

Photographical record prior to major development or demolition. Recognise and interpret the site if possible.

4

31

 

In consultation with members of the Heritage Advisory Committee (HAC) and the Wanneroo Historical Society, one new place was recommended by the consultants to be appropriate for inclusion in the City’s LHS and three places were recommended to be incorporated into existing entries, as follows:

 

1.   Wanneroo Recreation Centre, Scenic Drive, Wanneroo – Allocated a management category of 4;

 

2.   Bert Togno Park, Cnr Dundebar Road and Civic Drive Wanneroo – Included within the Wanneroo Civic Precinct entry with a management category of 2;

 

3.   Limelight Theatre, Scenic Drive, Wanneroo – Included within the Wanneroo Civic Precinct entry with a management category of 2;

 

4.   Portion of Old Wanneroo Road: Between Pippidini and Lacey Road and North of Carabooda – Included in the Old Wanneroo Road entry with a management category of 4;

 

The consultants have recommended 37 heritage places (included as Attachment 3) for removal from the new LHS for a range of reasons including:

·    Existing protection under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972.

Aboriginal heritage sites have been excluded from the new LHS in order to ensure alignment with recent heritage reforms proposed for the Heritage Act 2015.  Aboriginal heritage sites are afforded protection under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972; City Administration is currently working with the Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group to identify how locally significant Aboriginal heritage sites may be able to be afforded additional protection.  This will be a separate piece of work to the LHS and could involve either a new policy or District Planning Scheme No 2 provisions.

·    No heritage value;

·    Relocation or demolition; or

·    Unable to be located.

 

As a result the new LHS includes a total of 84 sites and precincts. The key differences between the previous MHI and the new LHS are:

·    A new site was assessed and included;

·    Two precincts were changed to places;

·    Provision of an up to date thematic history for the City of Wanneroo;

·    Addition of up-to-date details about existing sites and the provision of colour photographs; and

·    User friendly layout, easy to find specific places and browse heritage places by locality;

 

Should Council adopt the new LHS, Administration will provide a copy on the City’s website and make the LHS available for viewing during Civic Centre opening hours.

 

Heritage List

 

DPS 2 requires the City to establish and maintain a list of heritage places called the Heritage List. This list is retained by the City and made available for viewing within the completed LHS. The heritage list includes those places on the LHS that were allocated a management category of 1(A) or 2, and provides protection to those places under DPS 2 and LPP 4.12.

 

The external consultants have provided the City an updated Heritage List (Attachment 1) however, the City must engage with the owners and occupiers of any places on the heritage list that have been added, removed or changed. Should Council adopt the new LHS, Administration will engage affected owners and occupiers, review any submissions received and prepare a report to Council to adopt the new Heritage List.

 

Local Planning Policy 4.12 Heritage Places

 

As the document replacing the existing MHI will be renamed LHS, Administration has prepared a minor amendment to LPP 4.12 to:

·    Change any reference to MHI or Municipal Heritage Inventory 2006 to LHS or Local Heritage Survey 2016 respectively;

·    Change the content of Table 1 to omit the requirement of colour slides and require digital photos to be submitted on a USB instead;

·    Change the format to be consistent with the City’s current local planning policy template;

·    Change the clause numbers referenced in the policy to align with the newly adopted deemed provisions of DPS 2; and

·    Change any referral to ‘heritage impact statement’ to ‘heritage assessment’ (to align with new terminology within the State Heritage Office Guidelines).

 

The draft Policy is included as Attachment 2.

Consultation

Local Heritage Survey

 

Affected land owners were notified by mail of the City’s intention to update the MHI and provided with an opportunity to make submissions with regard to their property’s heritage status.

 

Following this, Administration approached the HAC for input into the new LHS, discussed the implications of the new LHS in detail with a Community Representative of the HAC and gained input from the Wanneroo Historical Society including the identification of new places for inclusion.

 

Should Council adopt the new LHS, Administration will write to all affected land owners informing them of the new LHS and the new heritage status of their property. Administration will also make the LHS available for viewing during business hours, provide an electronic copy on the City’s website and update the City’s intra-mapping system.

 

Local Planning Policy 4.12 – Heritage Places

 

The proposed amendment to LPP 4.12 is not considered to require public advertising as the changes are minor in nature and do not change the intent or effect of the policy.

 

Heritage List

 

The City cannot enter or remove a place, or modify an existing entry on the Heritage List unless it:

 

a)   notifies in writing each owner and occupier of the place and provides each of them with a description of the place and the reasons for the proposed entry; and

b)   invites each owner and occupier to make submissions on the proposal within 21 days of the day on which the notice is served or within a longer period specified in the notice; and

c)   carries out any other consultation the local government considers appropriate;

d)   following any consultation and consideration of the submissions made on the proposal, resolves that the place be entered in the heritage list with or without modification, or that the place be removed from the heritage list; and

e)   gives notice of the entry, removal or modification to the Heritage Council of Western Australia and each owner and occupier.

 

Should Council adopt the new LHS, Administration will endeavour to carry out the above consultation, consider any submissions received and prepare a further Council report to adopt the revised Heritage List.

Comment

All heritage places listed in the previous MHI have been assessed in detail by the City’s chosen heritage consultants, Hocking Heritage Studios under the guidance of the State Heritage Office Guidelines. Those sites considered to lack sufficient heritage value have been removed and those considered to retain sufficient heritage value have been assigned management categories based on a thorough assessment of heritage value. Overall, this ensures the greatest level of detail and accuracy for Administration, land owners and the community when seeking information on places of heritage value in the City of Wanneroo.

 

From a usability perspective, the new LHS has been significantly improved. The updated LHS includes the addition of colour photos (where possible) and the provision of all relevant details in a new and improved format that has been optimised to provide greater clarity, structure and readability. Heritage places are now organised into alphabetised ‘localities’ and an index at the rear of the document provides the ability to quickly navigate to a specific property or simply browse the City’s heritage places. If adopted, the LHS will be utilised to guide conservation and aid future development decisions by informing an update of the City’s Heritage List.

Statutory Compliance

Section 45 of the Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990 requires the City to compile and maintain an inventory of heritage places using proper public consultation.

 

The new document is also consistent with the draft Heritage Bill (2015) that was released in August 2015 in anticipation of it superseding the existing Act in the near future. Consequently, the new document will be named LHS and now aligns with both the existing Act and any relevant Heritage reforms outlined in the Green Bill.

 

Clause 8 of the deemed provisions of DPS 2 requires the City to establish and maintain a Heritage List to identify places within the Scheme that are of cultural heritage significance and worthy of built heritage conservation. Updating the Heritage List must be undertaken with appropriate consultation and a resolution of Council.

 

Clause 5 of the deemed provisions of DPS 2 permits the City to make an amendment to a local planning policy without advertising the amendment if, in the opinion of the local government, the amendment is a minor amendment.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

The completion of the new LHS triggers the need for minor changes to LPP 4.12 to ensure clarity and consistency between the policy and the new LHS. A copy of the amended policy is provided in Attachment 2.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       Pursuant to Section 45 of the Heritage of Western Australia Act, resolves to:

a.       ADOPT the new Local Heritage Survey to supersede the previous Municipal Heritage Inventory;

b.      NOTIFY affected landowners of the changes to the LHS;

c.       FORWARD a copy of the Local Heritage Survey to the Heritage Council of Western Australia;

2.       Pursuant to clause 8 of the Deemed Provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2 resolves to:

a.       ADOPT the amended Heritage List for advertising;

b.      NOTIFY affected land owners and occupiers by mail inviting submissions for a period of 21 days;

3.       Pursuant to clause 5 of the Deemed Provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2, resolves to:

a.       ADOPT draft revised Local Planning Policy 4.12 – Heritage Places (included as Attachment 2) without advertising.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Recommended Heritage List

16/50536

 

2.

PDF of revised LPP 4.12 Heritage Places

16/50924

 

3.

Places recommended for removal

16/50642

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          12

Draft

3.3    Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy

File Ref:                                              6903 – 16/35003

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider the draft Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy (CCAMS) for approval to advertise for public comment.

 

Background

In Western Australia, the CSIRO predicts climate change to result in hotter days and nights; reduced rainfall in the southern region, but more intense rain periods; more extreme weather conditions such as long periods of drought and severe storms; more bushfires; and rising sea levels. It is expected that the City of Wanneroo will be affected by these impacts.

 

The City’s Strategic Community Plan Environment Pillar includes a strategy to “Minimise impacts of climate change” and the City has already progressed a number of initiatives in line with this strategy:

 

Since 2010, the City has had a Sustainability Investment Fund (SIF) that has been successful in reducing energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  The SIF has funded the installation of solar panels at high energy use sites such as Aquamotion, Kingsway Sporting Complex and Clarkson Library. Most recently, the fund has invested in a voltage optimisation system at Aquamotion that will reduce the amount of coal fired electricity used at the centre and cut expenses by reducing wasted energy. Cost savings made by SIF investments are redirected back into the fund for future projects.

 

In 2011, the City jointly sponsored the build of the award winning Ecovision affordable display homes. During their twelve month display period, the homes were viewed by hundreds of local community members. Some of the home’s main features included water conservation features such as greywater, solar photovoltaics and passive solar design principles.

 

Notwithstanding the above, an action has been identified in the City’s Corporate Business Plan for Administration to prepare a CCAMS to provide a more coordinated approach to climate change response.  A draft CCAMS has been prepared and is based around 4 key themes of Temperature, Rainfall, Extreme Weather Events and Sea Level Rise. The purpose of the CCAMS is to identify areas where the City and its local community are exposed to climate change and provide risk management adaption measures to reduce the risk.

 

The City’s Strategic Community Plan also includes a strategy to improve energy efficiency.  Administration is in the process of preparing an Energy Reduction Plan that will look at reducing the energy use of the City’s buildings and fleet and influence the behaviour of local residents.

Detail

A draft CCAMS is included as Attachment 1. The CCAMS looks specifically at the ways the City of Wanneroo can adapt to, and be prepared for the impacts of climate change as they arise. The CCAMS outlines the adaptive actions that are required to be implemented across the City and the required timeframes needed for successful implementation. The actions are based around four themes (temperature, rainfall, extreme weather and sea level rise), and each action has a service unit responsible for implementation. Example actions for each theme are outlined below:

 

Climate Change Risk

Example

Action

Responsibility

Related Impact

Time Frame

Temperature

Implement a Mosquito Monitoring Program and public education campaign to reduce the potential increase of mosquitos and educate the public regarding mosquitos in the home

Environmental Health

Impacts upon human health

1-2 years

Rainfall

Complete a comprehensive assessment of water usage within City buildings and identify key areas for savings

Strategic Asset Management

Increasing cost to deliver services

3-5 years

Extreme Weather Events

Review the City’s insurance policies to ensure they adequately treat climate change risks

Risk and business improvement

More intense storms

1 year

Sea Level Rise

Investigate incorporating salt resistant materials and technologies in upgrades of existing proposed development of Council owned buildings located in coastal areas subject to direct sea breeze and coastal erosion

Infrastructure building projects

Storm surges and flooding

3-5 years

 

 

The City’s Risk Management Framework has been used to identify effective management measures for the risks associated with climate change. The Risk Management Framework will assist in the implementation of the CCAMS adaptation actions and will allow for efficient allocation of resources addressing issues of utmost importance.

Consultation

In preparing the CCAMS, key internal stakeholders from each Directorate of City Administration were invited to attend a two-part workshop for the purpose of providing input. Further to these workshops, relevant service unit Managers were consulted in relation to actions that had been assigned to their service unit.

 

The draft CCAMS was presented to the City’s Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) on 3 February 2016. The EAC was supportive of the draft CCAMS being presented to Council for consideration and provided some feedback on the report to be considered alongside any submissions that might be received if the report is approved by Council for public advertising.

 

The draft CCAMS has been amended slightly following consideration by the EAC to include a table outlining current actions that the City is already undertaking to address impacts of climate change.

 

Once this strategy has been advertised for public comment, Administration will assess the comments received and recommend any changes to the CCAMS. A report will then be presented to the EAC for review, prior to it being presented to Council for final approval. Once endorsed by Council, the CCAMS can then be implemented.

Comment

The CCAMS will guide the City in its implementation of adaptation strategies to minimise the risk to the community from extreme weather events, coastal storm surge and other climate related risks.

 

The implementation of the CCAMS will aim to ensure that the City is in a better position to respond to climate change impacts as they arise.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “1     Environment - A Healthy and sustainable natural and built environment

1.1    Environmentally Friendly - You will be part of a community that has a balance of environmentally friendly development and conservation areas for future generations to enjoy

 

Risk Management Considerations

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Climate Change

High

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director of Planning and Sustainability

Manage

 

The risks relating to this issue have been identified and considered within the City’s strategic risk register. Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

If adopted by Council, there will be financial implications associated with implementing the actions outlined in the CCAMS. This would need to be considered for inclusion in the future operating budgets of the relevant service units through the City’s annual budget process.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council APPROVEs the draft Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy 2016-2020 as included at Attachment 1 and that it be advertised for public comment for a period of 28 days.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy

16/49961

Minuted

   


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          16

Draft

Approval Services

3.4    Amendment No. 152 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 - Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo

File Ref:                                              23041 – 15/572795

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider the submissions received during the public advertising of Amendment No. 152 to District Planning Scheme No.2 (DPS 2) and adoption of that amendment.

 

Applicant

Jacqueline and Tony Huntley

Owner

Jacqueline and Tony Huntley

Location

Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo

Site Area

1.5009 hectares (ha)

MRS Zoning

Rural

DPS 2 Zoning

Special Rural

 

 

Background

In February 2015 the City received a development application for a proposed Cattery at Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo (DA2015/338). Attachment 1 contains the location plan.

 

The land is zoned Special Rural in DPS 2 and is subject to the special provisions of Special Rural Zone No. 3. According to the special provisions, the land may be used for residential and/or horticultural purposes only. Council, at its meeting of 21 July 2015 considered the proposal following the public comment period and resolved as follows (refer Item PS08-07/15):

 

“That Council:-

1.     REFUSES the development application for the Cattery at Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo as the Cattery does not comply with Clause 2) of Special Rural Provision No. 3 in Schedule 13 of District Planning Scheme No. 2 as a Cattery is not a Residential or Horticultural purpose;

2.     ADVISES the submitters of this decision;

3.     Pursuant to Section 75 of the Planning and Development Act 2005, INITIATES Amendment No. 152 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 by amending Schedule 2 – Section 1 (Clause 3.20) Additional Uses to permit the land use ‘Cattery’ at Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo;

4.     Pursuant to Section 81 of the Planning and Development Act 2005, FORWARDS Amendment No. 152 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) for comment; and 

5.     Subject to no objection being received from the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA), ADVERTISES Amendment No. 152 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 for public comment for a period of 42 days, pursuant to Regulation 25(2) of the Town Planning Regulations 1967.”

By virtue of limiting the use of the subject land for Residential and Horticultural purposes only as per the special provisions relating to Special Rural Zone No.3, it rendered the land use Cattery as a prohibited use. Therefore Council at its above mentioned meeting resolved to refuse the development application for the proposed Cattery. However, it resolved to amend DPS 2 to allow it as an Additional Use by amending Schedule 2 – Section 1 of DPS 2.

Detail

Proposal

 

The details of the proposed Cattery (if allowed as an Additional Use) are as follows:

 

·        Four separate buildings used for the housing of the cats located to the northeast corner of the lot. Each building is 200 square metres (m2) in area and is divided into individual units for each cat with 25 units in each building;

 

·        An outbuilding approximately 30m2 in area used for storing equipment related to the cats such as food, litter and, bedding, in addition to a kitchen and laundry;

 

·        An outbuilding approximately 30m2 in area with a staff kitchen, toilets and staff room; and

 

·        An outbuilding approximately 25m2 in area used for customer toilets and grooming of the cats.

 

Attachment 2 provides a site plan, floor plan and elevations for the Cattery proposal on the subject lot. The proposed Cattery will cater for a total of 100 cats. 

 

The Cattery buildings are setback approximately 90 metres from Casuarina Way, 15 metres from the eastern boundary, 15 metres from the rear boundary and about 30 metres from the western boundary.

 

The proposed Cattery will only be used for the temporary housing of cats and will not be used for breeding of cats. The operating hours of the business for customers will be between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. seven days a week. The applicant has advised that either the cat owners will drop the cats off or the applicant will arrange for the cats to be picked up from their homes.

 

The applicant advises that the development of the Cattery will be staged. Stage 1 is to construct one of the four buildings (25 individual units). Stage 2 is to construct the second building after a year. The remaining two buildings will be constructed based on demand. Stage 1 will require one permanent employee and one part-time employee. When the Cattery is fully developed with all the four buildings, the applicant estimates that a total of four to six staff will work from the site.

Consultation

EPA in its correspondence of 21 September 2015 advised the City that it considered that the proposed amendment should not be assessed under Part IV Division 3 of the EPA Act 1986. Therefore the amendment was advertised for a period of 42 days.

 

The amendment was considered under the provisions of the now revoked Town Planning Regulations 1967 prior to the gazettal of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 in October 2015. Therefore under the provisions of the Town Planning Regulations 1967 the amendment was advertised for a period of 42 days. (It is noted that under the current Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 this amendment will be considered as a standard amendment and will be required to be advertised for a period not less than 42 days.)

 

Public advertising period was carried out between 06 October and 17 November 2015 by way of on-site signs, advertisement in the local newspaper, a notice in Council offices and the City’s website, and letters to the affected and nearby landowners. The City received nine (9) individual submissions and one 30-signature petition all raising objections to the amendment proposal.

 

Attachment 3 is the schedule of submissions including Administration’s comments. The issues raised in the submissions relate to odour, traffic and incompatibility with the future land uses when East Wanneroo is rezoned and developed as per the Western Australian Planning Commission’s (WAPC) East Wanneroo Structure Plan.

 

Comment

 

The following comments are made on the critical issues raised in the submissions:

 

Noise

 

The applicant has confirmed that the individual units would be sound proofed with the entrances facing away from the adjoining properties mitigating the sound that may be caused by the cats.

 

Odour

 

The odour concerns are addressed through the use of a high quality cat litter that will eliminate urine and faecal matter destroying bacteria within minutes of becoming wet. This litter will be stored in large plastic containers and disposed of weekly at the local refuse tip.

 

In regard to noise and odour it is noted that the City, to date, has not received any complaints about the catteries currently operating in the City at 49 Adams Road and 160 Pinjar Road in Mariginiup.

 

Traffic

 

Casuarina Way is a 20-metre wide road with a 6-metre wide carriageway capable of carrying an indicative traffic volume of 3,000 vehicles per day as per the WAPC’s Liveable Neighbourhood Policy. The 23 dwellings located on this road would generate 184 vehicles per day at the rate 8 vehicle trips per day per dwelling. Further it is noted that Casuarina Way is a loop road and will not carry through traffic. Therefore it will not reach its full capacity.

 

It should be noted that the above issues will be again assessed at the development application stage should the proposed amendment be gazetted and the applicant makes a development application for the City’s consideration.

 

Other matters

 

East Wanneroo Structure Plan Final Report 2011 (EWSP) – Impact of the Cattery on rezoning of land

 

Currently the subject land is zoned Rural in the Metropolitan Region Scheme (MRS) and Rural Resource in DPS 2. In the EWSP this land is identified as Potential Urban. Prior to rezoning the land to Urban, the land will need to be rezoned to Urban Deferred in the MRS, while the zoning in DPS 2 will still be Rural Resource.

 

The Western Australian Planning Commission’s (WAPC) “Guideline for the Lifting of Urban Deferment” states as follows:

 

Land may be included in the Urban Deferred zone under a regional planning scheme. This zone provides a strong indication that the land is physically and locationally suitable for Urban purposes, although certain requirements have to be met before the WAPC will agree to the land being transferred to the Urban zone.

 

These guidelines provide the mechanism to lift the Urban Deferment zoning and to transfer the land to Urban zone. The criteria to lift Urban Deferment are,

 

·        The land is capable of being provided with essential services;

·        Planning is sufficiently advanced to depict an acceptable overall design to guide future development;

·        The proposed urban development represents a logical progression of development;

·        Regional requirements such as regional road, open space and public purposes have been satisfied or provision made for them; and

·        Any constraints to urban development can be satisfactorily addressed.

 

It should be noted that if the land is transferred from Urban Deferred Zone to Urban Zone in the MRS and possibly be zoned Residential in the local structure plan, a Cattery, being a not permitted (‘X’) use in the  Residential Zone under DPS 2, will become a non-conforming use. It is further noted that there is no mechanism in DPS 2 to forcibly discontinue a non-conforming use.

 

Special Rural Zone Objectives

 

The objectives of Special Rural Zone are as follows (Clause 3.18.2 of DPS 2):

a)         Designate areas where rural-residential retreats can be accommodated without detriment to the environment or the rural character;

b)        Meet the demand for a rural lifestyle on small rural lots generally ranging from one to four hectares in size; and

c)         Maintain and enhance the rural character and amenity of the locality.

 

Of the above three objectives, the second one relates to the lot size. In regard to the other two objectives the following matters are noted:

 

1.       Rural-residential is defined in DPS 2 as, ‘a land use where land is utilised primarily for residential purposes in rural landscape but often also for some form of limited agricultural or rural use’. Rural Use is defined in DPS 2 as, ‘rural use means agriculture, horticulture and may include aquaculture and includes the raising of livestock and the retail sale of the produce of the property where satisfactory access and parking can be provided, and provided that any processing of the produce prior to sale can take place on site’.

 

In considering the above definitions, a Cattery is not considered to meet this objective and allowing it may be detrimental to the rural character of the locality.

 

2.       DPS 2 does not define ‘rural character’. It is noted, however, following the public comment period that the City received 10 submissions including a 30-signature petition objecting to the amendment proposal. It is the view of those who made a submission that a Cattery would not contribute to the rural character of the subject Special Rural Zone No.3. This is reflected in the special provisions of this zone which limits the use of land for Horticultural and Residential purposes only. Therefore the proposal does not satisfy this objective.

 

Considering the above it is recommended that the amendment not be supported.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council, at its meeting of 21 July 2015 considered a development application for a Cattery at Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo. The subject land is zoned Special Rural Zone No.3 in DPS 2 and is subject to special provisions which limit the use of the land for Residential and Horticultural purposes only. Therefore a cattery is a prohibited use. As a result, Council at its above mentioned meeting resolved to refuse the development application. However, it also resolved to amend DPS 2 to allow it to be considered as an Additional Use.

 

Following the public comment period the City received several submissions objecting to the proposal. One of the objectives of Special Rural Zone is to maintain and enhance the rural character and amenity of the locality. It is the view of those who made a submission that a Cattery would not contribute to the rural character of the locality. Therefore the proposal does not satisfy this objective.

 

Considering the above it is recommended that the amendment not be supported.

Statutory Compliance

Under the provisions of Regulation 34 of the Planning and Development Act 2005 and the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015, Amendment 152 to DPS 2 is considered to be Standard as it is consistent with the objectives of the Special Rural Zone wherein the amendment area is located.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “3     Economy - Progressive, connected communities that enable economic growth and employment.

3.2    Growing Business - Our community is a preferred place for business to locate and grow.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relates to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

 

Financial Implications

Nil

 

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1        Pursuant to Regulation 50(3) of Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 DOES NOT SUPPORT Amendment No.152 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 to amend Schedule 2 – Section 1 (Clause 3.20) Additional Uses to allow the land use Cattery at Lot 151 (41) Casuarina Way, Wanneroo as an Additional Use as the proposal does not satisfy the objectives (a) and (c) of Special Rural Zone contained in Clause 3.18.2 of the District Planning Scheme No. 2.

 

2        ADVISES the submittors of its decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Amendment 152

15/157650

 

2.

Amended Final Plans for Council Report

15/181174

 

3.

Attachment 3 to Amdt 152

16/61915

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          22

Draft

3.5    Consideration of Development Application (DA2015/1164) Existing Additions to a Single House (Patio, Retaining Walls, Shed and Carport) at 6 Moran Court, Wanneroo

File Ref:                                              DA2015/1164 – 15/578038

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To consider a development application (DA2015/1164) for Existing Additions to a Single House (Patio, Retaining Walls, Shed & Carport) at Lot 159 (6) Moran Court, Wanneroo (subject site).

 

Applicant

Tony Frisina

Owner

Tony Frisina

Location

Lot 159 (6) Moran Court, Wanneroo

Site Area

10,328m²

DPS 2 Zoning

Special Rural

 

 

Background

Lot 159 (6) Moran Court, Wanneroo is bound by Moran Court to the east, Bebich Drive to the north, and properties to the south and west. The subject site is zoned Special Rural under the City’s District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2). A location plan is provided in Attachment 1.

 

On 18 September 2014, the City received an enquiry from a nearby landowner regarding whether an existing carport on the subject site had either a valid planning approval or building licence.

 

Following an investigation by the City’s Health and Compliance Services, it was determined that the carport in question did not have either a planning approval or building licence. The investigation also identified that there were other existing structures on the site without either planning approval or a building licence, being a patio and two retaining walls.

 

To bring the property into compliance with DPS 2, the applicant was advised to either remove the unauthorised structures from the site, or to lodge applications for the approval of these existing structures.

 

On 24 June 2015, the applicant submitted a development application seeking retrospective approval for the unauthorised structures on the site.

Detail

The development application proposes the following:

 

·        A patio which is 56m² in area, has a 4.6m roof height and is located 25.0m from the southern boundary;

 

·        Two (2) retaining walls which are setback a minimum of 7.0m from any lot boundary, and retain fill up to a maximum height of 1.3m.

 

·        A shed which is 58m² in area, has a 4.0m roof height and is located 10.0m from the southern boundary, and proposes a variation to the DPS 2 requirements; and,

 

·        A carport which is 88m² in area, has a 3.0m roof height and is located between 9.0m to 12.0m from the western boundary, and proposes a variation to the DPS 2 requirements.

 

The relevant site plan and elevations are included in Attachment 2.

 

As the shed and carport propose setback variations to the DPS 2 requirements, these variations for the shed and carport components of the application were advertised to the respective affected landowners of the adjoining properties.

Consultation

Public consultation was undertaken by way of sending written notification to affected landowners to the west and south of the subject site. At the conclusion of the comment period (21 days) one submission was received which objected to proposal. The objection related to:

 

·    The submitter not acquiring permission from the neighbour prior to development; and

 

·    Objected to the reduced setback, however didn’t give any specific reasons as to how or why the reduced setback would impact his property.

 

A detailed discussion of the major issues considered in the assessment of the application and the objection received are provided in the Comment section below.

Comment

The proposed Single House Additions are a ‘D’ discretionary use under the zoning table of DPS 2 within the Special Rural zone. As per Clause 6.6.2 of DPS 2, in exercising its discretion, Council shall have regard to Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2, which sets out the matters to be considered by Council. These include, but are not limited to:

 

·    The objectives of the Special Rural zone;

 

·    Maintain the character and amenity of the area; and

 

·    Any submissions which have been received on the application.

 

An assessment of the application against the provisions of DPS 2 is provided below:

 

Patio and Retaining Walls

 

The proposed patio and retaining walls are compliant with all relevant requirements of DPS 2, including setbacks, and are therefore supported by Administration.

 

Shed

 

Clause 3.18.3 (d) of DPS 2 requires development to be setback 15m from all side and rear boundaries. The proposed shed is located 10m from the southern boundary of the subject site.

 

Administration notified the adjoining landowner of the proposed setback variation of the existing shed; however no submission was received within the advertising timeframe. It is also noted that the landowner contacted Administration to discuss the proposal, and expressed no concerns with the setback of the shed.

 

The shed is considered to satisfy the relevant matters under Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions for the following reasons:

 

·    The provided setback is adequate to avoid any issues associated with privacy, as there are no windows proposed on the shed;

 

·    The reduced setback maintains accommodates a sufficient firebreak, being 3m;

 

·    The shed is adjacent to a heavily vegetated area on the adjoining property. Therefore, the setback does not impact the residents or the visual amenity when viewed from the adjoining property as it is screened by this existing vegetation; and

 

·    The proposal is not considered to have a detrimental impact on the rural character and amenity of the locality as it is adequately screened from view (as noted above), and is consistent with the objectives of the Special Rural Zone.

 

As a result, Administration supports the shed.

 

Carport

 

Clause 3.18.3 (d) of DPS 2 requires development to be setback 15m from all side and rear boundaries. However, the proposed carport is located between 9m to 12m from the western boundary of the subject site.

 

The objection received by the City related to the carport and the attached workshop. It is noted that the workshop in question had a building licence approved by the City on 20 July 1988 (BA1988/4306). Under the City’s Town Planning Scheme No. 1 (TPS 1), as the workshop was not being used for a commercial purpose, it was considered a Dwelling House. In accordance with Clause 7.1 of TPS 1, a Dwelling House was exempt from requiring approval, prior to Amendment 814 of TPS 1 being published on 9 June 1998.

 

The concerns raised by the submitter did not include relevant planning considerations which detailed how the carport impacts the adjoining property. The submission raises the following points, with Administrations comments provided below:

 

1.       “The structure in question is six metres outside the building envelope. In accordance to DPS 2, it should be 15m”.

 

In regards to the submitter’s statement that the development is outside the building envelope, this is not strictly correct, as there is no building envelope located on the subject lot. Rather, development should be in accordance with the setback requirements outlined under DPS 2, which includes a 15m side and rear setback as noted previously.

 

2.       “Furthermore before Council can grant approval, the owner of 6 Moran Court, should have acquired permission from his neighbours. Permission was never sought and we do not grant permission and we have no intention of giving permission”.

 

In regards to the submitter’s statement that approval from the neighbours is required, this is incorrect, as there is no requirement under DPS 2 for a neighbour to ‘give approval’ to any setback variation. In the event of a variation to DPS 2 requirements, the City may advertise the proposal if it deems it necessary, and take into account any submissions that may be made, which raise relevant planning considerations. Council may still approve variations where neighbours have objected to the proposal, where the proposal is considered to meet the matters to be considered by Council of Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions.

 

The carport is considered to satisfy the matters to be considered by Council under Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions as:

 

·    The setback of the carport is considered adequate to avoid any issues associated with privacy, as the carport is located to the rear of the property and is approximately 59 metres from the submitter’s dwelling;

 

·    The reduced setback accommodates a sufficient firebreak of 3m;

 

·    The carport is adjacent to a hardstand area which ensures that it does not impact the residents or the visual amenity when viewed from the adjoining property;

 

·    The proposed carport is consistent with the character of the Special Rural zone and is not prejudicial to the amenity of the locality.

 

As a result, Administration supports the carport.

Conclusion

The development application seeking approval for existing Single House Additions (Patio, Retaining Walls, Shed & Carport) on Lot 159 (6) Moran Court, Wanneroo has been assessed against the relevant provisions of DPS 2. In doing so, due regard has been given to the objectives and provisions of Special Rural Zone, as well as the matters to be considered by Council in Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions, which must be taken into consideration when making a determination on a proposal which seeks a variation to DPS 2 requirements.

It is recognised that the applicants have acted unlawfully by erecting these structures without obtaining the necessary approvals; however the assessment of this application has been based purely on planning grounds and has not been influenced by the unlawful conduct of the applicants.

In light of the above, Administration recommends Council approve development application DA2015/1164 for the proposed patio, retaining walls, shed and carport.

Statutory Compliance

This application has been assessed in accordance with the City of Wanneroo’s District Planning Scheme No. 2.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

In accordance with the current Compliance Policy, the City may take various actions to deal with a non-compliant development.  The initial steps seek to bring the matter into compliance.  Where the landowner does not act to bring the matter into compliance, the City can take further action such as issuing a Directions Notice and/or Prosecution.  In this case, the landowner has agreed to address the non-compliance by seeking retrospective approval.  If the application is approved by Council, no further enforcement action will proceed. 

Financial Implications

Nil

 

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       Pursuant to Clause 68(2)(b) of the Deemed Provisions of District Plannning Scheme No. 2, APPROVES the Development Application (DA2015/1164) submitted by the landowner, Tony Frisina, as shown in Attachment 2 for Existing Additions to a Single House (Patio, Retaining Walls, Shed & Carport) at Lot 159 (6) Moran Court, Wanneroo subject to the following conditions:

a)      This approval only relates to the proposed Existing Additions to a Single House (Patio, Retaining Walls, Shed & Carport) as highlighted on the approved plans. It does not relate to any other development on the lot;

b)      All stormwater shall be contained on-site;

c)      The Patio, Shed and Carport shall only be used for purposes incidental to the residence, and shall not be used for commercial or industrial purposes, as well for human habitation; and

d)      This approval is only valid from the date of this decision and does not retrospectively authorise any previous unapproved use of the subject land.

 

2.       NOTIFIES the submitter of this decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Location Plan

15/465333

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Proposed Plans

15/589187

Minuted

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          27

Draft

3.6    SAT Reconsideration of Development Application (DA2014/186) Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) at Lot 121 (288) Carabooda Road, Carabooda

File Ref:                                              DA2014/186 – 15/597930

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To reconsider the refusal of a development application for a proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) at Lot 121 (288) Carabooda Road, Carabooda, in response to an invitation made by the State Administrative Tribunal (SAT), pursuant to section 31 of the State Administrative Tribunal Act 2004 (WA).

 

Applicant

Dr Harrie Hofstede

Owner

Robert Hugall

Location

Lot 121 (288) Carabooda Road, Carabooda

Site Area

141.2 ha

DPS 2 Zoning

Rural Resource

 

 

Background

The subject site is located at Lot 121 (288) Carabooda Road, Carabooda. The site is zoned Rural Resource under the City District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2). The site is surrounded by Rural Resource zoned land to the north and south, Regional Parks and Recreation/State Forest zoned land to the west, and Public Purpose reserved land to the east, currently used by the Water Corporation. A location plan is provided in Attachment 1.

 

The City’s Environmental Health Officers received multiple complaints from surrounding properties regards to a stockpile of raw chicken manure on the site since February 2013. The complaints received from the City related to:

 

·    The odour being generated from the stockpile;

·    The stockpile being responsible for flybreeding; and

·    The stockpile attracting rodents.

 

The City’s Environmental Health Officers raised these complaints with the applicant, and attempted to resolve the complaints by undertaking regular inspections to ensure that the stockpile was covered to prevent odour escaping, and sampling the stockpile for evidence of flybreeding and material which would attract rodents.

 

As a result of these complaints, it was also identified that there was a breach of DPS 2, as the stockpile was an unauthorised land use. In accordance with the Compliance Local Planning Policy 4.14, the applicant was advised to either remove the stockpile, or to submit an application for planning approval.

 

Previous Application

 

On 11 February 2014, the City received a development application (DA2014/186) for an Unlisted Use (Stockpile) on the site.

 

The application proposed the stockpiling of 3000m2 of composted chicken manure in its existing location, being 215m from the eastern lot boundary and 90m from the northern lot boundary.

 

Public consultation of the application was originally undertaken by way of the landowners within 750m of the stockpile location being notified in writing, and took place between 29 May 2014 and 18 June 2014. During this period of consultation, one submission objecting to the proposal was received.

 

The submission raised concerns regarding the odour being generated from, and flies and rats being attracted to, the stockpile on the site.

 

Following this, Administration requested the applicant to relocate the stockpile to a central location, and increase the setback to the adjoining boundaries. The applicant was also requested to provide additional information with regards to the management and treatment of the chicken manure stockpile, in response to the concern raised in the submission.

 

The applicant did not amend the plans, nor provide additional information as requested by Administration.

 

On 24 June 2015, Administration refused the application under delegated authority for the following reasons:

 

1.   The application does not adequately demonstrate how the proposed Unlisted Use (Stockpile) satisfies the provisions of Clause 6.8, and the objectives of the Rural Resource zone under Clause 3.17.1 of DPS 2.

 

2.   The plans provided in the application are considered inadequate as they are not to scale, do not show the setback to the lot boundaries, and do not include the dimensions of the stockpile.

 

SAT Proceedings

 

Following Administration’s decision on 24 June 2015, the applicant exercised their rights to seek a review of the decision at SAT.

 

The applicant submitted an application for review to SAT on 20 August 2015. The matter has been the subject of mediation hearings regarding the appropriate location and management of the stockpile.

 

Following these mediation hearings, SAT issued the following orders on 1 December 2015:

 

1.   The applicant is to provide additional information as discussed at the mediation to the respondent by 11 December 2015.

 

2.   Pursuant to s31(1) of the State Administrative Tribunal Act 2004 (WA) the respondent is invited to reconsider the application on or before 1 March 2016.

 

In accordance with SAT order 1, the applicant has been provided the required information to the City, and the application is now being presented to Council for reconsideration, in accordance with      SAT order 2.

 

It is noted that the application refused by Administration, and the application being presented to Council has one notable difference. The application considered by Administration proposed the stockpiling of raw chicken manure on the site. The application being presented for reconsideration proposed the stockpiling of manure which has been composted in accordance with the Australian Standard. The detail of this is provided below.

 

Detail

 

The detail of the application, which was required to be submitted as a result of the SAT orders, is as follows:

 

Site Plan

 

The applicant has provided the requested amended site plan to Administration, which relocates the stockpile. The stockpile is now proposed to be located centrally within the lot, 300m from the eastern lot boundary and 500m from the northern lot boundary.

 

This site plan is provided in Attachment 2.

 

Management of Stockpile

 

The applicant has advised that the compost stockpile is to consist of composted chicken manure only, which is generated from and treated off site. This is to occur at 134 Old Yanchep Road, Carabooda, which is currently approved as Rural Industry (Manure Composting Facility), and composts and treats raw manure that is delivered to the site. This process involves the raw manure being delivered to the site, where it is blended and aerated to break down the raw product, and kill bacteria. The treated compost is then transported from the site.

 

The applicant has advised that the need for the compost to be stockpiled on the subject site is due to there being an oversupply. The subject site is to be used to stockpile any excess manure processed from the manure composting facility.

 

The applicant has confirmed that the stockpile will be kept in accordance with the requirements of Australian Standard AS4454-2003 Composts, Soil Conditioners and Mulches, and treated prior to being delivered to the site.  No composting or treatment of the compost is proposed to be carried out on the subject site.

 

The existing stockpile, which contains both raw manure and treated compost at present, in the north-east corner of the lot will be removed from the site. A new stockpile consisting of treated compost only is to be located in the position outlined above.

 

The stockpile will be a maximum of 3,000m3, and will be stored in an area 100m x 100m on the lot, with the stockpile itself to be located in three smaller piles, each 70m x 10m.

 

The compost will not be sold from the site, and is to be distributed to local farms from the site by the applicant. The applicant has advised that this will be approximately two to three times per week, and is expected to mainly occur during the peak seasons for vegetable farming, being January to March and September to November. There will be no customers coming to the site to purchase the compost.

 

Consultation

 

Public consultation of the application was originally undertaken, as noted previously, between 29 May 2014 and 18 June 2014. One submission objecting to the proposal was received during this period.

 

Following SAT’s invitation to reconsider the application, public consultation was again undertaken by way of notifying the same landowners (including the objector) who were previously consulted, being those landowners within 750m of the stockpile location. At the conclusion of the comment period (23 December 2015 to 18 January 2016) three submissions were received, all of which objected to the proposal.

 

A summary of submissions received and Administration’s responses is provided in Attachment 3.

 

The main issues raised during the advertising period relate to the generation of odour, flies and rodents from the stockpile.

 

A more detailed discussion of the major issues considered in the assessment of the application is provided in the Comment section.

Comment

Administration’s assessment of the major issues of the proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) is discussed below:

 

Land Use Appropriateness

 

The proposed compost stockpile does not fall within any of the land use categories of DPS 2.

 

As such it is considered as an unlisted use. In accordance with Clause 3.3(b) of DPS 2, which outlines the procedure for dealing with unlisted uses, it may be determined that the proposed use may be consistent with the objectives and purposes of the zone, and follow the ‘D’ procedures outlined in Clause 6.6.2 of DPS 2. In exercising this discretion, the provisions of Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2 shall be given regard.

 

The appropriateness of the proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) is considered against the relevant provisions of Clause 67 of the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2. This includes the aims and objectives of the Rural Resource zone, and the relationship of the development on development on other land in the locality, and the amenity of the locality. This is summarised below:

 

·        The objectives of the Rural Resource zone of Clause 3.17.1 are to protect the area from incompatible uses which may restrict the continued or expanded use of land for intensive agriculture, horticultural, animal husbandry, and basic raw materials extraction uses. The proposed stockpile of compost does not restrict any of these possible uses on adjoining properties, and is therefore considered to be consistent with the objectives of the Rural Resource zone;

 

·        Clause 3.17.2(b) of DPS 2 states that within the Rural Resource zone, the priority uses are intensive agriculture, horticulture and basic raw materials extraction. While the use of the stockpile does not necessarily fall within these categories, the compost is a by-product of an approved use within the Rural Resource zone, being the Manure Compost Facility previously mentioned, which processes raw chicken manure. Additionally, as the compost is used on surrounding farms, which fall within the agricultural type land use favoured within the zone, the proposed stockpile is considered to be consistent within the Rural Resource zone;

 

·        As mentioned above, the proposed compost stockpile is considered to be a compatible use within the Rural Resource zone, and will have a negligible impact on the surrounding properties as a result if its height, bulk, scale and appearance due to it being located a minimum of 300m from the nearest lot boundary; and

 

·        The amenity of the locality can be maintained should the compost stockpile being appropriately managed. These methods are outlined in the Management of Health Issues section of this report.

 

Based on the above, the proposed compost stockpile land use is considered appropriate for the Rural Resource zone it is to be located in.

 

Management of Health Issues

 

During the advertising of the proposal, the City received submissions, relating to the management of the stockpile with regards to odour, fly breeding and rodents generated from the site.

 

It is acknowledged that the existing stockpile has resulted in a number of complaints being received by the City with regards to the odour, flies and rodents being generated from the site. These have been the subject of investigation from the City’s Environmental Health Officers, which in some instances, found the stockpile was breeding flies, and pests were found within the stockpile. This ultimately resulted in the application for planning approval being lodged in February 2014.

 

In consideration of the application, the applicant has advised that the remaining raw manure being stockpiled on the site will be removed.  Administration recommends that the applicant be issued with a directions notice to ensure that all raw manure is removed from the site in a timely manner.

 

The applicant has further advised that the compost stockpile that is the subject of this application will be maintained in accordance with AS4454-2003, and will not consist of raw manure, as has previously been the case on the site.

 

AS4454-2003 outlines the processing requirements of composts, soil conditioners and mulches to facilitate the use of biodegradable organic materials with minimal risk and impact to both the environment and public health.

 

Under AS4454-2003, organic products are treated over a minimum six week process to breakdown the raw material. As a result, the treated product will generate little to no odour, nor will it encourage flies to breed or attract rodents. Following this treatment, the product is considered safe to be used and applied as compost.

 

Accordingly, Administration recommends a condition requiring the proposed stockpile to be maintained in accordance with the Australian Standard AS4454-2003 Composts, Soil Conditioners and Mulches to be imposed. This will ensure that the stockpile will not have environmental impacts, or impact on the public by way of odour, flybreeding, or generation of rodents, and addresses the concerns raised in the submissions received by Administration.

 

If approved, the City’s Environmental Health Officers can ensure this condition is monitored by carrying out samples of the stockpile to ensure it meets AS4454-2003. Should it be identified through this process that the compost stockpile is not being kept in accordance with AS4454-2003, the applicant would then be in breach of the planning approval, and would be subject to compliance action.

 

Traffic

 

The applicant has advised that there will be between two and four deliveries of compost to the site per week, being transported down from the Manure Composting Facility at 134 Old Yanchep Beach Road. Compost will be transported from the stockpile to local farmers who have ordered the product between two and three times per week.

 

As there are no customers coming to and from the site, the worst case scenario would be four deliveries to the site, and three deliveries from the site per week. This would result in an additional 14 truck movements from the site per week. The impact of these additional movements from the site is considered to be able to be accommodated in the surrounding road network with negligible impact.

 

To ensure this, Administration recommends including a condition to restrict deliveries of compost site to be a maximum of four per week to the site, and three per week from the site.

 

Conclusion

 

The orders issued by SAT on 1 December 2015 invite the City to reconsider its previous decision with respect to the proposed Unlisted Use (Stockpile). Under s31(2) of the State Administrative Tribunal Act 2004, Council may do one of the following:

 

(a)        Affirm the decision; or

(b)        Vary the decision; or

(c)        Set aside the decision and substitute its new decision.

 

As outlined above, the application is considered appropriate for the following reasons:

 

·        The proposal is consistent with the objectives and requirements of the Rural Resource zone of DPS 2;

·        The proposed is considered a compatible use with the surrounding area;

·        The proposal is not considered to have detrimental impact on the amenity, through its management and the imposition of conditions on any approval granted;

·        The submissions received raised concerns which are acknowledged by Administration, but can be overcome by the imposition of the recommended conditions of planning approval; and

·        The proposal will not result in a significant amount of traffic, and can be accommodate in the existing network.

 

As such, Administration recommends that Council set aside the decision by Administration to refuse the application on 24 June 2015, and approve the application for the proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile), subject to conditions.

 

Additionally, as there is currently material stockpiled on the site which is not in accordance with AS4454-2003, Administration recommends that Council issues a directions notice to the applicant for this to be removed from the site.

Statutory Compliance

This application has been assessed in accordance with the City of Wanneroo’s District Planning Scheme No. 2.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

In accordance with the current Compliance Policy, the City may take various actions to deal with a non-compliant development.  The initial steps seek to bring the matter into compliance.  Where the landowner does not act to bring the matter into compliance, the City can take further action such as issuing a Directions Notice and/or Prosecution.  In this case, the landowner has agreed to address the non-compliance by seeking retrospective approval.  If the application is approved by Council, no further enforcement action will proceed. 

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       Pursuant to Section 31 (2) of the State Administrative Tribunal Act 2004 (WA), SETS ASIDE its decision dated 24 June 2015, and APPROVES the modified application for an Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) at Lot 121 (288) Carabooda Road, Carabooda, subject to the following conditions:

a)   This application relates only to the proposed Unlisted Use (Stockpile) as indicated on Attachment 2. It does not relate to any other development on the lot.

b)   The proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) shall only consist of compost which is treated and maintained in accordance with the Australian Standard AS4454-2003 Composts, Soil Conditioners and Mulches, to the satisfaction of the City of Wanneroo. This compost shall be treated to the AS4454-2003 requirements prior to being stockpiled on the site.

c)   A report by a suitably qualified person confirming that the compost stockpile complies with Australian Standard AS4454-2003 Composts, Soil Conditioners and Mulches shall be submitted to the City at the cost of the applicant prior to the commencement of the use and at any other time when requested by the City.

d)   The proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) shall be located in the area indicated on Attachment 2, and setback a minimum of 300m from the eastern boundary and 500m from the northern boundary

e)   The proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) shall be a maximum size of 3,000m3.

f)    The proposed Unlisted Use (Compost Stockpile) shall have no more than four (4) deliveries of compost to the site per week, and no more than three (3) deliveries of compost from the site per week. No customers are permitted to the site.

g)   All stormwater shall be collected and retained on site.

h)   The applicant shall undertake adequate measures to minimise any impacts of dust, and sand drift, from the site, to the satisfaction of the City of Wanneroo

i)    This approval is only valid from the date of this decision, and does not retrospectively authorise any previous unapproved use of the subject land.

2.       ADVISES the State Administrative Tribunal, the applicant, and the submitters of its decision; and

3.       Instruct Administration to issue pursuant to Section 214 (3) of the Planning and Development Act 2005 a directions notice to the applicant to remove any existing untreated material, including raw manure, which is not in accordance with AS4454-2003.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 -  Location Plan

15/590403

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Plan

15/586300

Minuted

3.

Attachment 3 - Schedule of Submissions

16/50728

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          35

Draft

3.7    Application for Intensive Agriculture (Mushroom Farm) at Lot 1 (163) Belgrade Road, Wanneroo

File Ref:                                              DA2015/81 – 15/564986

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4

Previous Items:                                   PS07-09/13 - Proposed additions to existing 'Intensive Agriculture' (Crown Mushrooms) at Lot 1 (163) Belgrade Road, Wanneroo - Ordinary Council - 17 Sep 2013 7.00pm       

 

Issue

To consider a development application for Intensive Agriculture (Mushroom Farm) at Lot 1 (163) Belgrade Road, Wanneroo.

 

Applicant

Crown Wanneroo Pty Ltd

Owner

Crown Wanneroo Pty Ltd

Location

Lot 1 (163) Belgrade Road, Wanneroo

Site Area

60,682m2

MRS Zoning

Rural

DPS 2 Zoning

Rural Resource

 

 

Background 

Crown Mushrooms has been in operation at the subject site from circa 1972 until October 2014. A location plan of the site is provided as Attachment 1.

 

Council, at its meeting on 26 April 2006 (PD15-04/06), approved two applications for development at Crown Mushrooms, for Stages 1 and 2 respectively, comprising:

 

Stage 1       Replacement of existing facilities, with no change to the growing activities, composting volume or production routines (DA05/0774).

 

Stage 2       Construction of an enclosed composting barn, bio-filter and stormwater compensation basin (DA05/0895).

 

Council's approval for the Stage 1 application was subject to the following conditions:

 

1.       Stage 2 of the development, being a composting barn, biofilter and stormwater compensation basin additions to the mushroom farm, as proposed under the City of Wanneroo application reference DA05/0895 being completed and operational prior to 31 December 2012.  The landowners shall enter into a legal agreement with and to the satisfaction of the City to secure this requirement prior to the commencement of any works.

 

2.       The quantity of compost being limited to no more than 5,000 tonnes per year.  An annual report shall be submitted to the City, stating the approximate tonnage that has been carted to the site over the preceding year.

 

3.       All stormwater being retained on site to the satisfaction of the Director, Planning and Development.

 

 

 

On 24 October 2006, the landowner entered into a legal agreement with the City, as required by Council’s approval, secured by a caveat, requiring the development to be completed and fully operational prior to 31 December 2012. To date, the landowner has neither implemented the development associated with Council's Stage 2 approval nor provided any annual reports relating to the tonnage of compost carted to the site.

 

On 14 December 2012, the City received an application seeking approval to commence development of some additions to the Crown Mushrooms comprising of an Indoor Composting Facility, Bio-filter, Ammonia Scrubber and Stormwater Basin.  Council, at its meeting of 17 September 2013 resolved as follows (PS07-09/13):

 

1.    APPROVES the application for planning approval (DA2012/1349) for additions to an existing 'Intensive Agriculture' (Indoor Composting Facility, Bio-filter, Ammonia Scrubber and Stormwater Compensation Basin), subject to compliance with the following conditions to the satisfaction of the Manager Planning Implementation:-

 

a)      This approval only relates to the proposed Indoor Composting Facility, Bio-filter, Ammonia Scrubber and Stormwater Basin, as shown on Attachment 1.  It does not relate to any other development on the lot.

 

b)      The proposed Indoor Composting Facility, Bio-filter, Ammonia Scrubber and Stormwater Basin shall be completed and fully operational prior to 31 December 2014.

 

c)      All composting on the subject lot shall be undertaken within the Indoor Composting Facility from the time the Indoor Composting Facility, Bio-filter, Ammonia Scrubber and Stormwater Compensation Basin is completed and fully operational.

 

d)      All compost produced on the site shall be used in association with the on-site Intensive Agriculture operation only.

 

e)      All stormwater shall be retained on site.

 

2.    ADVISES the landowner that the City may commence compliance and enforcement proceedings in relation to the non-compliance with Conditions 1 and 2 of Council's planning approval for Stage 1 dated 4 May 2006, included as Attachment 2, if the development proposed by DA2012/1349 is not completed, fully operational and compliant with the approval granted by 1. above, by 31 December 2014.

 

In August 2014, Crown Mushrooms went into Administration and in October 2014 all mushroom growing activities ceased operation on site. The approval previously granted by Council was acted upon and therefore, in accordance with Clause 6.10.2 of the City of Wanneroo’s District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2) this application is not considered to be an amendment to the previous approval rather, a new development application. The site was sold to ABN Group in December 2014. On 12 January 2015, a planning application was submitted by Crown Wanneroo Pty Ltd. A representative of ABN Group has clarified that Crown Wanneroo Pty Ltd is a subsidiary to ABN Group. Administration subsequently requested additional information regarding details of the proposed operation on site. On 7 October 2015, the applicant provided this required information which enabled the application to be progressed.

 

Detail

The subject site is zoned as Rural Resource under DPS 2. As per the Zoning Table and Part  3 of DPS 2, an Intensive Agriculture use class is a Permitted (“P”) use but may be subject to any conditions that the Council may wish to impose when granting approval.

 

The details of the application are as follows:

 

·        No indoor composting facility, bio-filter, ammonia scrubber and stormwater compensation basin, are being proposed as the application seeks to import already composted material to the site;

 

·        Production of approximately 5 to 15 tonnes of mushrooms per week;

 

·        Use of bulk or bagged phase 3 mushroom substrate (composted off-site);

 

·        Weekly deliveries of compost (between 5m3 to 50m3) to be stored in a building on a concrete hardstand;

 

·        Spent or surplus compost to be stored on a hardstand in a building and removed offsite within 48 hours. Once removed from the site the compost will be taken to a soil blending facility where it will be used as a soil improver for landscaping;

 

·        Hours of operation:

 

o   Monday to Friday – 7am to 7pm;

o   Saturday – 7am to 3pm;

o   Sunday – 8am to 3pm;

o   Public Holidays – 8am to 3pm; and

 

·        Employment of 8 to 25 people.

 

A copy of the site plan is provided as Attachment 2

Consultation

The proposal was advertised for a period of 21 days from 16 October to 14 November 2015 by way of written correspondence to landowners within a 500-metre radius of the subject site and an advertisement on the City’s website. At the conclusion of the comment period, a total of 18 submissions were received – 17 from the public and one from the Water Corporation of WA. 16 submissions objected to the proposal and two did not raise any objection. A schedule of submissions and Administration’s response are included as Attachment 3.

 

The main issues raised in the submissions are as follows:

·        The perception that the operation will affect the future rezoning and subdivision of the land surrounding the subject site;

·        Emission of odour;

·        Term of approval of the proposal ;

·        Hours of operation;

·        Department of Environment Regulations (DER) Licence; and

·        Vehicle movements.

 

A more detailed discussion of these issues is provided in the Comment section.

Comment

East Wanneroo Structure Plan Final Report 2011 (EWSP) – impact of mushroom farm on rezoning of land

 

Council at its meeting on 2 February 2016 while considering an application relating to Lion Mushroom Farm at 69 Rousset Road, Mariginiup noted the following, which is also applicable to the current application. However, it should be noted that Council resolved to refuse the application for the Lion Mushroom Farm.

 

Currently the subject land is zoned Rural Resource in DPS 2 and Rural in the Metropolitan Region Scheme (MRS). In the EWSP this land is identified as Potential Urban. Prior to rezoning the land to Urban, the land will need to be rezoned to Urban Deferred in the MRS while the zoning in DPS 2 still remains Rural Resource.

 

The Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) is currently proposing to amend the MRS by rezoning most of the land identified as Potential Urban in EWSP including the subject land from Rural to Urban Deferred. Following advice from the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) (and assuming that the EPA will not require formal assessment), the amendment will be advertised for public comments. At the time of writing this report it is understood that the matter still being considered by the EPA.

 

Please see Attachment 4 containing the map “Agricultural Sites and their Buffers” appended to EWSP. The map indicates a 500-metre buffer around the mushroom farms. Since the EWSP identifies the subject site and land surrounding it as Potential Urban the mushroom farm will not prevent the rezoning from Rural to Urban Deferred under the MRS.

 

In regard to rezoning the land from ‘Urban Deferred’ to ‘Urban’, the WAPC’s “Guidelines for the Lifting of Urban Deferment” provide the mechanism. The criteria to lift Urban Deferment are,

 

·        The land is capable of being provided with essential services;

·        Planning is sufficiently advanced to depict an acceptable overall design to guide future development;

·        The proposed urban development represents a logical progression of development;

·        Regional requirements such as regional road, open space and public purposes have been satisfied or provision made for them; and

·        Any constraints to urban development can be satisfactorily addressed.

 

Considering the above it is likely to take some time before the land is zoned Urban in the MRS which will be followed by rezoning DPS 2 and the preparation of structure plans.

 

It should be noted that Council at its meeting on 2 February 2016 while considering a submission to the WAPC on the proposed Amendment 1304/57 to the MRS to rezone four properties on Belgrade Road and Dundebar Road, Wanneroo from Rural to Urban Deferred supported Amendment 1304/57.

 

Term of approval and Hours of Operation

 

To ensure the use of the subject land does not indefinitely impact the development potential of surrounding landowners once the land is zoned Urban, Administration considers it appropriate to limit the term of operation of the mushroom farm should it be considered appropriate to grant Planning Approval. In 2012, Council granted planning approval for Lion Mushroom Farm at 69 Rousset Road, Mariginiup in East Wanneroo, and imposed a condition whereby the timeframe for the approval was the later of the following:

 

·        Seven years from the date of approval; or

·        Three years from the date the subject land, or land immediately adjacent to a 500 metre buffer was zoned ‘Urban’ under the MRS.

 

Administration considers that a similar approach could be considered for this proposal.

 

Lion Mushroom Farm was approved to operate between 7am to 10pm seven days a week during the months of July and January inclusive, and 7am to 9pm seven days a week during the months of February and June inclusive. 

 

The proposed hours of operation of Crown Mushrooms are lesser than those approved for Lion Mushroom Farm and therefore are considered acceptable.

 

Odour concerns (compost delivery, storage and disposal)

 

Administration is well aware of the odour concerns relating to the previous operations on the site.  The odour resulted from the manufacture of compost on the land, as the manufacturing process involved blending of raw manures in an outdoor environment.  This on-site compost manufacturing is no longer proposed, instead the applicant is proposing to import phase 3 mushroom substrate which has already been through the composting process elsewhere and therefore, the finished product virtually emanates no odour. In this regard, Administration is recommending two conditions namely:

 

·        Compost shall be imported in sealed containers only: and

·        Imported compost shall be stored in an enclosed, temperature controlled environment.

 

In order to ascertain whether the compost imported on-site in bags/bulk would emanate odour, Administration undertook a site visit to the Lion Mushroom Farm at 69 Rousset Road, Mariginiup, which uses bagged compost in its operations. Administration witnessed the storage of the bags of compost on delivery, and the storage of spent compost prior to being removed from the site.  At no stage during this site visit did Administration experience any odour. 

 

In respect of the storage and disposal of spent compost, the applicant has advised that spent or unused compost will be stored on a hardstand for removal from site within 48 hours.  The Lion Mushroom Farm visited by Administration removes its spent compost from site within 48 hours. Therefore, Administration is recommending a condition on any Planning Approval issued that spent compost shall be stored within an enclosed temperature controlled environment and be removed from the site within 48 hours.

 

DER Licence

 

The applicant advised that the DER licence held previously to blend compost on site has now expired. The proposal to import phase 3 mushroom negates a need for a DER licence. However, should the applicant identify the need for a DER licence to enable composting on site, another Planning Approval would be required. An Advice Note to this effect will be added to any Planning Approval issued.

 

Vehicle movements

 

Concern was raised on ingress and egress of vehicles from the subject land.  The traffic volumes associated with the proposal are considerably lower than those generated by the previous operation. The previous operation generated approximately 230 vehicle movements per day. The subject application is estimated to generate approximately 40 vehicle movements per day. Administration is not aware of any complaints relating to traffic movements from the previous operation and is therefore of the view that the vehicle movements generated by the current application will not adversely impact the surrounding area and are considered to be safe.

Conclusion

 

Administration recommends that Council approve the development application subject to a number of conditions addressing the following matters:

 

·        Timeframe of approval;

·        No manufacturing of compost to be undertaken on-site and all compost to be imported in sealed containers;

·        All compost to be stored in an enclosed, temperature controlled environment until it is removed from site; and

·        Hours of operation.

 

Should Council be of the view that the proposal should not be supported, this may be considered on the following basis:

 

·        The proposal for an Intensive Agriculture land use may be considered to have impacts on the amenity of nearby residents in terms of increased noise and nuisance;

 

·        The proposal seeks to entrench an activity that is inconsistent with the long term future urbanisation of the subject land and the surrounding area, as envisaged in the Western Australian Planning Commission’s East Wanneroo Structure Plan document; and

 

·        The proposal may set an undesirable precedent in the locality for similar uses in the future.

Statutory Compliance

This application has been assessed in accordance with the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “3     Economy - Progressive, connected communities that enable economic growth and employment.

3.2    Growing Business - Our community is a preferred place for business to locate and grow.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no strategic or corporate risks identified in Council’s Risk Register that relate to the matter discussed in this report.

Policy Implications

Local Planning Policy 5.3: East Wanneroo applies to the subject land.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       Pursuant to Clause 68(2)(b) of the Deemed Provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2 APPROVES the development application for Intensive Agriculture (Mushroom Farm) at Lot 1 (163) Belgrade Road, Wanneroo, as shown in Attachment 2, subject to compliance with the following conditions:

a)      This approval only relates to the proposed Intensive Agriculture (Mushroom Farm), as indicated on the approved plans. It does not relate to any other development on the lot.

b)      The use of the land shall only be for the purposes of “Intensive Agriculture” as defined in the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, which is as follows:

“Any land or buildings used for trade or commercial purposes for the following:

(a)     The production of grapes, vegetables, flowers, exotic and native plants, fruit and nuts (including market gardens); or

(b)     The establishment and operation of plant and fruit nurseries; or

(c)     The development of land for irrigated fodder product and irrigated pasture (including turf farms).”

A change of use from that outlined above will require the approval of the City.

c)      This planning approval shall expire:

a.    Within 3 years of the date:

i.        The land immediately adjacent to the 500-metre mushroom farm buffer is gazetted ‘Urban’ under the Metropolitan Region Scheme (MRS); or

ii.       The land is gazetted ‘Urban’ under the MRS,

                                      whichever occurs first in time; or

b.    Within 7 years of the date of this planning approval,

                     whichever is the later;

d)      No compost manufacturing or soil blending shall occur on-site.

e)      Compost shall be delivered to the site in sealed containers only and stored in an enclosed temperature controlled environment until such time it is removed from site for disposal.

f)       Spent or surplus compost shall be removed from site within 48 hours.

g)      A minimum of 25 car parking bays shall be provided on site. 

h)      The hours of operation shall be:

i.     Monday to Friday – 7am to 7pm;

ii.    Saturday – 7am to 3pm;

iii.   Sunday and Public Holidays – 8am to 3pm;

          Any changes to the above hours of operation will require further approval from Council; and

2.       ENDORSES Administration’s responses to the submissions as provided in Attachment 3; and

3.       ADVISES the submitters of its decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Aerial Location Plan

16/1624

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Site Plan

15/506537

Minuted

3.

Attachment 3 - Schedule of Submissions

16/38151

Minuted

4.

Attachment 4 - Map of EWSP area

15/599382

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          43

Draft

3.8    Proposed Amendment No. 25 to Agreed Structure Plan No 1 (Cell 3) – Increase in retail net lettable area from 1,900m2 to 4,300m2

File Ref:                                              3377-25 – 15/571796

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4         

 

Issue

To consider submissions received during public advertising of Amendment No. 25 to the East Wanneroo Cell Number 1 - Agreed Structure Plan No. 3 (ASP 3) and consideration of the amendment.

 

Applicant

Rowe Group

Owner

Freshlink Export Pty Ltd

Location

Part Lot 19 (20) Clarkson Avenue, Tapping

Site Area

Approximately 1.8 hectares

MRS Zoning

Urban

DPS 2 Zoning

Urban Development

ASP 3 Zoning

Commercial and Residential

 

 

Background

At its meeting of 29 May 2012, Council granted planning approval for a local centre at Lot 19 (20) Clarkson Avenue, Tapping (DA2011/195), which comprised two drive-through food outlets, convenience store, carwash, office, medical centre, veterinary consulting rooms, take-away food outlet, restaurant and shop land uses. DA2011/195 already made full utilisation of the 1,100m² maximum net lettable area (NLA) of retail floorspace allocated to the subject site under ASP 3.

 

On 6 June 2012, a development application (DA2012/548) was lodged to change the use of the veterinary clinic and office tenancies approved under DA2011/195 to shop. This development application proposed to increase the retail floorspace above that permitted in ASP 3 by replacing non-retail floorspace, veterinary clinic and office, with additional retail floorspace, in the form of a shop use. As a result, the applicant was advised that the City would be unable to progress the application as it proposed additional retail floorspace to that permitted under ASP 3 at that time.

 

On 28 June 2012, Amendment No. 21 to ASP 3 was lodged, which proposed to increase the retail floorspace of the subject site to 1900m2. Advertising was undertaken in accordance with Clause 9.5 of District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2) and Clause 4 of the City's Local Planning Policy 4.2: Structure Planning (LPP 4.2) and Amendment No. 21 to ASP 3 was considered by Council at its meeting of 2 April 2013 (PS02-02/13) where it was resolved that Amendment No. 21 to ASP 3 was satisfactory. The amendment was then submitted to the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) and on 3 September 2013 the City received the WAPC adopted Amendment No. 21 to ASP 3.

 

While Amendment No. 21 to ASP 3 was being considered by the City and the WAPC, an additional application DA2013/810 to amend the land uses of DA2011/195 from shop, restaurant and take away food outlet to a liquor store and office as well as associated building reconfiguration was lodged. At its meeting of 20 August 2013 (PS03-08/13), Council granted planning approval for these amendments. Upon adoption of Amendment No. 21 to ASP 3, Administration, under delegated authority, approved DA2012/548 for the change of use from veterinary clinic and office to shop and utilise the newly approved 1,900m2 of retail NLA.

 

On 7 September 2015, Rowe Group (the applicant) on behalf of Freshlink Export Pty Ltd lodged Amendment No. 25 to ASP 3 for the City's consideration. On 30 September 2015, the Manager Planning Implementation forwarded a memorandum to all Elected Members, advising of the lodgement and proposed advertising of Amendment No. 25 to ASP 3. In accordance with Clause 18 of DPS 2 Deemed Provisions the Amendment was advertised for public comment on 20 October 2015 and concluded on 17 November 2015.

Detail

Lot 19 Clarkson Avenue is located on the south-east corner of the intersection of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road, Tapping. The western portion of the site is zoned Commercial under ASP 3, while the eastern portion of the site is zoned Residential with a density coding of R40 under ASP 3. Amendment No. 23, that proposes to amend this coding from R40 to R60, was considered at the 8 December 2015 Council meeting and deferred for additional traffic information to be provided. Amendment No. 23 is subject to a separate report on this agenda. The development is located across Wanneroo Road from various lots which form Drovers Place Agreed Structure Plan No. 80 (ASP 80). A location plan is included as Attachment 1 and indicates the part of Lot 19 that is zoned Commercial.

The proposed amendment seeks to increase the maximum retail NLA allocated to the Commercial zoned portion of Lot 19 under Schedule 1 of ASP 3 from 1,900m² to 4,300m². The amendment documentation is included in Attachment 2. DPS 2 provides the following definition of retail net lettable area:

"retail net lettable area: means the net lettable area use for any of the purposes listed in Planning Landuse Category 5 – Shop/Retail (excluding hotels, taverns and nightclubs) of the WA Standard Land Use Classification (WASLUC)."

The abovementioned definition is consistent with that contained within State Planning Policy 4.2: Activity Centres for Perth and Peel (SPP 4.2).

The applicant has provided the following rationale in support of the amendment:

·        In November 2008, the City considered an amendment to ASP 3 which ultimately created the Commercial zone currently applicable to the site. At the time, the applicant was of the understanding that fast food, take away food and restaurant uses did not form part of the retail floorspace allocated to the site. Since that time, the City of Wanneroo has adopted the definition of 'shop-retail' prescribed by SPP 4.2 for the purpose of enforcing retail floorspace limits. The original intent of the development is now compromised by virtue of the requirement to deduct restaurant, cafe, function centre and take away food outlet floorspace from the proposed prescribed retail floorspace limit of 4,300m²;

·        In order to maintain commercial viability, the development on the neighbourhood activity centre will need to provide local, convenient retail services that will attract customers to the centre. Local centres are typically anchored by uses such as a liquor store, food outlets, medical/pharmacy, and convenience retail activities. The transfer of many of these uses to the adjacent ‘Out of Centre’ location at Drover’s Place results in the need to adjust the retail anchor for the subject site. It is therefore intended that the development on the subject site will now include a small scale supermarket use to act as an attractor for other tenants; and

·        A review of the retail floor space demand relative to the subject site has been undertaken by Shrapnel Urban Planning. The review has demonstrated that 4,300m2 of retail floor space can be justified on the site. The study considers growth patterns and assesses retail demand relative to the catchment population over time. It has been demonstrated that the retail impact on other centres will effectively be imperceptible.

Administration notes that the land uses which fall under the definition of ‘shop-retail’ and are therefore considered within the retail floorspace limit is based on the term 'retail net lettable area' that is defined under DPS 2. DPS 2 pre-dates the adoption of SPP 4.2. Therefore, from the City's perspective, Administration does not accept that the original intent of the development has changed subsequent to the release of SPP 4.2. Furthermore, the fact that certain precincts located within the ASP 80 are able to establish retail land uses, with no limitation on floorspace, is not considered a relevant issue in the consideration of the proposed amendment. Notwithstanding this, the applicant has carried out revised retail flooorspace modelling for the centre and demonstrated that a retail floorspace allocation of 4,300m² for the site is appropriate. This matter is discussed in greater detail in the comment section of this report.

Consultation

The Amendment was advertised for public comment for a period of 28 days by means of an on-site sign, an advertisement in the Wanneroo Times newspaper, a notice on the City’s website and letters written to adjoining landowners. The submission period closed on 17 November 2015, with five submissions being received. A summary of submissions received and Administration responses are shown in Attachment 3.

 

The main issues raised during the advertising period relate to:

 

·    The generation of traffic along Clarkson Avenue and the impact on the road network as well as the intersection of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road;

·    The need for the increase in retail net lettable area given the surrounding development; and

·    The impacts of the development on adjoining landowners if undertaken in accordance with the notional development plan submitted together with Amendment No. 25.

 

A more detailed discussion of the major issues considered in the assessment of Amendment No. 25 is provided below.

Comment

Traffic Generation

 

Concerns were raised that the proposed increased retail NLA of the subject lot would potentially result in traffic congestion on the surrounding road network. In support of the proposal the applicant submitted a technical note prepared by Transcore which assessed the traffic implications on the surrounding road network. In doing this the technical note compared the vehicle trips per hour that would be generated during a typical Thursday peak hour between the approved plans (DA2012/548) and the notional development plan lodged with Amendment No. 25. The notional development plan does not form a development application and only provides guidance on vehicle trips.

 

The technical note, as shown in Attachment 4, identified that with 4,300m2 of retail NLA the neighbourhood centre would generate approximately 1002 vehicles per peak hour (VPPH) compared with 827 VPPH based on DA2012/548. Given the size of the centre, the technical note expects that about 10% of the total trip generation would be internal and reciprocal. Taking this into consideration the VPPH would reduce to 902 for the notional plan and 744 for the approved plan. This would result in an approximate increase of 158 VPPH.

 

Based on existing traffic patterns and attraction nodes in the surrounding locality, the technical note assumes that daily traffic will be distributed in accordance with the following:

 

·        35% of VTPD would travel to/from east on Clarkson Avenue;

·        30% of VTPD would travel north on Wanneroo Road; and

·        35% of VTPD would travel south on Wanneroo Road.

 

The City's Traffic and Transport Service Unit has assessed the technical note provided by the applicant and has confirmed that the projected traffic increases will not have a detrimental impact on the road network. In addition it is considered that the peak use of the neighbourhood centre, being Thursday evenings and Saturdays, would not have a direct conflict with the peak hours from the surrounding school, being weekdays between 8am – 9am and 2.30pm – 5.30pm.

 

Having regard to the additional traffic of 158 VPPH that is anticipated to be generated by the future development of the subject area as a result of the proposed amendment, it is not considered to adversely impact on the flow of traffic in the surrounding area.

 

Additional Traffic Assessment

 

At the 8 December 2015 Council meeting Amendment No. 23 to ASP 3 was deferred in order for additional traffic assessment to be undertaken. The City commissioned consulting firm GHD to undertake a review of the technical note prepared by Transcore in order to determine whether further traffic investigation is warranted. GHD’s review, dated January 2016, endorsed the methodology used by the technical note for forecasting traffic volume increases and supported the conclusion of the technical note that the traffic impact of the proposed amendment, compared to the approved plan, will be minimal. In addition, the report identified a number of other factors which should be taken into consideration including parking and access for customer vehicles and service vehicles. Administration considers these to be detailed matters to be determined at development application stage.

 

The study did identify that the development was in proximity to the St Stephens School and that due to the pedestrian and traffic movements, it may warrant a pedestrian crossing being provided along Clarkson Avenue. The provision of a pedestrian crossing is a separate process whereby the school needs to make an application. As such, the developers would not be able to progress the matter further without the school’s involvement.

 

As a separate matter, the City has undertaken investigations into numerous schools within Wanneroo to establish if pedestrian crossings are warranted due to the pedestrian and traffic numbers. The criteria for requiring a pedestrian crossing is where a minimum of 200 vehicles and 20 school children pedestrian movements occur within the hour immediately before and immediately after school. Clarkson Avenue (abutting St Stephens School) was identified as meeting these criteria without development occurring on Lot 19 Clarkson Avenue. As such, the City, through the Road Safety Working Group, is aiming to write to schools, including St Stephens, to advise of the process for application. It is intended that this will occur in the near future.

 

In light of the conclusions presented in GHD’s review of the technical note submitted by Transcore, Administration does not consider the projected traffic increases, as a result of the proposed amendment, to warrant further traffic analysis. Administration considers that the technical note prepared by Transcore sufficiently demonstrates that the projected increases in traffic will not adversely impact traffic flow in the locality.

 

 

Provision of Traffic Lights at the Intersection of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road

 

The development, as discussed above, is not considered to have any adverse impacts on the traffic flow of the surrounding roads. Notwithstanding this, a submission was received on behalf of the owners of Lots 1 and 132 Wanneroo Road, located within the Drovers Place Precinct ASP 80 area, which objected to the subject amendment unless the requirement for a contribution towards a signalised intersection at Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road was incorporated into the amendment. The owners of Lots 1 and 132 are currently responsible for the provision of a signalised intersection at Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road, as Table F (Clause 5.1) of ASP 80 states that:

 

“If business development of Lots 1 and 132 is proposed, in accordance with the structure plan, a condition of such development shall be that the subdivider/developer of Lots 1 and 132 Wanneroo Road in the Business Precinct, in consultation with MRWA, shall design and construct a fourway signal controlled intersection at the junction of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road, as indicated on Plan 1, to the specification and satisfaction of the City of Wanneroo.

 

The submission contends that it is inequitable for the owner of Lots 1 and 132 Wanneroo Road to incur the total cost of designing and constructing traffic lights at the intersection of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road, when a nexus exists between the increase in retail floorspace proposed by the amendment and an increase in traffic to the area. A similar submission was received on behalf of owner of Lots 1 and 132 Wanneroo Road in relation to the development application for the local centre (DA2011/195) that was approved by Council at its meeting of 29 May 2012 on Lot 19 Clarkson Avenue (Item PS12-05/12). Administration's report to Council on 29 May 2012 noted that the need for signalisation of the intersection of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road had only arisen as a direct result of the expansion of the Central Precinct of the Drovers Place development into Lots 1 and 132 and that the issue was never raised as a consideration as part of Amendment No. 12 to ASP 3, which resulted in the western portion of Lot 19 being rezoned Commercial. This position was previously conveyed in Administration's report to Council at its meeting of 24 July 2012 on the adoption of ASP 80 (Item PS11-07/12), at which it was resolved that Council, amongst other matters:

 

"ADVISES the Western Australian Planning Commission that the City of Wanneroo will only consider the potential for cost sharing arrangement to be applied to the provision of traffic signals, as described in Table F of Structure Plan No. 80, if and when an amendment to that structure plan provision is proposed by a landowner within the structure plan area."

 

Notwithstanding Council’s previous decision, the increase in the retail floor space to 4,300m2 warranted further analysis to ensure that equitable distribution of costs for the upgrading of the intersection were catered for. For Amendment No. 4 to ASP 80 this was undertaken through an Administration commissioned report undertaken by GHD to forecast trip generation from Lots 1 & 132 Wanneroo Road, Lots 810 & 811 Wanneroo Road and Lots 6, 7 & 8 Drovers Place (Drovers Place).

 

A further report was commissioned, using the same methodology as undertaken for Drovers Place, to determine the percentage of traffic from the surrounding commercial development (including the Drovers Place lots and subject lot) which would use the intersection. This report found that the subject lot would attribute approximately 18.7% of the traffic passing through the Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue intersection from commercial uses when fully developed.  Although it is only the additional traffic generated as a result of Amendment No. 25 that is considered to represent a nexus for the development contributing to the upgrading of the intersection. On this basis, it is recommended that a modification be included in the text of ASP 3, consistent with the requirement in ASP 80. The modification will state;

 

If development of Lot 19 Clarkson Avenue is proposed, in accordance with the structure plan, a condition of such development shall be that the subdivider/developer of Lot 19 Clarkson Avenue, in consultation with MRWA, shall contribute to the design and construction of a four-way signal controlled intersection at the junction of Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road to the specification and satisfaction of the City of Wanneroo. Any such contribution shall be based on the proposed increased traffic as a result of Amendment No. 25 to Agreed Structure Plan No. 3. Appropriate cost sharing arrangements between landowners and any other authority or person will be the subject of a separate agreement.

 

It is Administration's understanding that the owners of Lots 1 and 132 Wanneroo Road are currently in discussions with state government agencies regarding a potential cost sharing arrangement for the signalised intersection at Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road.

 

Justification for an Increase in Retail Floorspace

 

A submission was received on behalf of the owners of Lots 810 and 811 Wanneroo Road, located within the Drovers Place Precinct ASP 80 area, stating that an increase in the amount of retail floorspace allocated to Lot 19 was not justified.

 

In support of the proposal, a Retail Sustainability Assessment (RSA), undertaken by Shrapnel Urban Planning, was submitted with Amendment No. 25 to ASP 3. The RSA supports the proposal to increase the retail NLA to 4,300m2 and demonstrates that the additional retail floorspace is viable and supported by the surrounding population and that the impact of the increase on surrounding centres is insignificant and will contribute to the level of services available to the local community. The RSA notes the main reasons for this are;

 

·        The Tapping centre will be a relatively small centre, and the proposed retail floorspace increase is relatively small (2,400m2) when compared to the total amount of retail floorspace required to adequately service the primary study area of the RSA.

·        The currently planned distribution of activity centres is highly compatible with the proposed expansion of the Tapping centre. At present there is no other centre planned within the large suburb of Tapping.

·        Based on the projected population figures, the study area population is anticipated to increased significantly and the overall supply of retail floorspace is (rightly) assumed to increase to keep pace with population growth and thus retail floorspace demand.

·        Over time, the proportion that the proposed Tapping centre expansion represents to the overall retail floorspace supply reduces within the study area. In 2016 a Tapping centre of 4,300m2 would represent a relatively minor 7.3% of the total retail floorspace in the primary study area. Over time this proportion will steadily reduce until, by 2036, it will represent a mere 3.3% of the total retail floorspace in the area.

 

The matter was considered by the City’s Economic Development service unit who agree the increase in retail NLA can be supported based on the expected population increases and the expansion will have minimal impact on the surrounding activity centres. This was reinforced by the review of the retail gravity model included as an appendix in the RSA.

 

Administration considers the 4,300m² of retail floorspace sought by the applicant to represent a minor increase in the overall floorspace of the primary study area of the RSA. The modelling undertaken shows the increase would not have any discernible adverse impacts on any nearby centre and is therefore supported.

 

 

 

 

Impacts of Notional Development Plan

 

Of the submissions received, two raised objections based on elements which would be considered at the development application stage, including impacts of traffic, noise and odour, as well as visual impacts such as the removal of landscaping and views of the back of house/service areas.

 

The notional development plan (NDP) has been submitted in order to provide an indicative allocation for the retail floor space in considering the amendment. The NDP is indicative and is provided for information only. A development application for the proposal, including both land use and building design, would need to be submitted to the City for its consideration. At this stage the City would consider items such as the impact on the surrounding residential amenity and compliance with relevant planning legislation such as setback requirements, car parking, landscaping, the location and screening of service areas and other development standards. The City would also undertake its assessment in light of previous applications approved and the extent of changes which are proposed.

 

The proposed amendment is for the consideration of the increase of retail NLA to 4,300m2 and not the configuration of development on the site. 

Conclusion

 

In light of the above comments, Administration considers the proposed amendment to be acceptable and therefore recommends that the amendment be adopted by Council subject to modifications as discussed in the body of the report and contained in Attachment 3.

Statutory Compliance

This structure plan amendment will follow the statutory process outlined in the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015. In order to meet timeframes associated with the clause 20(2)(e) of the City of Wanneroo Planning Scheme No 2 Deemed Provisions and present a report to the Western Australian Planning Commissions within 60 days from the last day of advertising, Council cannot defer the proposed application and can either support the amendment, support the amendment with modifications or not support the amendment.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “3     Economy - Progressive, connected communities that enable economic growth and employment.

3.2    Growing Business - Our community is a preferred place for business to locate and grow.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relates to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

This proposal has been assessed under the provisions of DPS 2 and Local Planning Policy 3.2: Activity Centres.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.       Pursuant to subclause 20(2)(e) of the deemed provisions of City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, RECOMMENDS to the Western Australian Planning Commission that Amendment No. 25 to the East Wanneroo Cell 1 (Tapping and Ashby) Agreed Structure Plan No. 3 submitted by Rowe Group on behalf of Freshlink Export Pty Ltd included as Attachment 2 be approved subject to the modifications as included in Attachment 3 and SUBMITS a copy of the proposed structure plan and all accompanying material as received from the applicant;

 

2.         Pursuant to subclause 20(1) of the deemed provisions of City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, PROVIDES the Western Australian Planning Commission a copy of the report on the proposed structure plan amendment; and

 

3.       NOTES the Schedule of Submissions included in Attachment 3, ENDORSES Administration's responses to those submissions, FORWARDS the Schedule of Submissions to the Western Australian Planning Commission, and ADVISES the submitters of its decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1- Location Plan

13/11389

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Proposed Amendment Page for Amendment 25 to Cell 1

15/590297

Minuted

3.

Attachment 3 - Schedule of Submissions - Amendment 25 to ASP 1

16/52210

Minuted

4.

Attachment 4 - Technical Note table - Trip Generation of existing and proposed

15/590327

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          51

Draft

3.9    Proposed Amendment No. 23 to the East Wanneroo Cell 1 Agreed Structure Plan No. 3

File Ref:                                              3377-24 – 15/593457

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider submissions received during public advertising of Amendment No. 23 to the East Wanneroo Cell 1 (Tapping and Ashby) Agreed Structure Plan No. 3 (ASP 3) and support of the amendment.

 

Applicant

Rowe Group

Owner

Freshlink Export Pty Ltd

Location

Lot 19 (20) Clarkson Avenue, Tapping

Site Area

40426m2

MRS Zoning

Urban

DPS 2 Zoning

Urban Development

ASP 3 Zoning

Commercial and Residential

 

 

Background

On 30 October 2014, Rowe Group, on behalf of Freshlink Export Pty Ltd, lodged Amendment No. 23 to ASP 3 for the City’s consideration. The amendment relates to the eastern portion of Lot 19 (No. 20) Clarkson Avenue, Tapping, as identified on the map included as Attachment 1. The eastern portion of the site is zoned 'Residential' with a density coding of R40 under ASP 3. The western portion of the site is zoned ‘Commercial’ however is not subject to this amendment.

 

Approval for subdivision of the subject site has been granted by the Western Australian Planning Commission on 6 November 2014 (WAPC 150486). Upon completion, the subdivision will facilitate the extension of Corvus Road and will split the site into two separate land parcels.

 

On 28 April 2015, the Manager Planning Implementation forwarded a memorandum to all Elected Members, providing the opportunity for members to request referral of the proposal to Council for consent to advertise. No such requests were received and, as such, advertising of Amendment No. 23 to ASP 3 commenced on 19 May 2015 in accordance with Clause 9.5 of District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2).

 

On 8 December 2015 the matter was presented to Council for consideration where it was deferred by Elected Members in order for additional traffic assessment to be undertaken. On 19 December 2015 Administration requested consulting firm GHD to undertake a review of the traffic report as submitted with the amendment as well as identify any other major issues associated with both Amendment No. 23 (this amendment) and Amendment No. 25 for the proposed increase in the Retail NLA for the commercial portion of Lot 19 Clarkson Avenue, Tapping. The results are discussed in the body of the report.

Detail

Amendment No. 23 proposes to modify the ASP 3 map and text to increase the residential density coding of the subject site from R40 to R60 and to increase the site’s height restrictions. The application initially proposed a maximum height of 24m (8 storeys) above natural ground level (NGL), however, prior to advertising, this proposal was reduced to a maximum height of 12m (4 storeys) above natural ground level (NGL). Attachment 2 shows the existing and proposed ASP 3 maps for the subject site as well as the proposed text modifications.

 

The purpose of the amendment is to enable a greater housing yield to facilitate multiple dwellings on the subject site. Under the current R40 coding, the subject site is capable of generating 1.164ha of plot ratio floor space.

 

If supported, the R60 coding will allow for 1.358ha of plot ratio floor space, an increase of 1,940m2 of plot ratio floor space on the subject site. The applicant has indicated that the future development of the site is likely to incorporate multiple dwellings of approximately 80m2 in area. Assuming 80m2 multiple dwellings are developed on the site, under the R40 coding 145 dwellings can be created whilst the R60 coding will allow for 169 dwellings, an increase of 24 dwellings.

 

The height restrictions will be implemented as part of a Local Development Plan for the subject site. The proposed layout of the site will include the following:

 

·        A 4.0m building setback buffer between the subject site and the existing Residential R20 lots adjoining the site;

·        A maximum height of 6.0m above NGL (2 storeys) between 4.0m and 20.0m from the southern and eastern lot boundaries;

·        A maximum height of 9.0m above NGL (3 storeys) between 20.0m and 45.0m from the southern and eastern lot boundaries; and

·        A maximum height of 12.0m above NGL (4 storeys) for the portion of land at the intersection of Clarkson Avenue and Corvus Road.

The applicant has not provided any concept plans for the future development or subdivision of the site.

Consultation

The amendment was advertised for public comment for a period of 42 days by means of an on-site sign, an advertisement in the Wanneroo Times newspaper, the City’s website and letters written to adjoining landowners. The submission period closed on 30 June 2015, with 13 submissions being received including one petition with 83 signatures. A summary of submissions received and Administration responses are shown in Attachment 3.

 

The main issues raised during the advertising period relate to:

 

·        Inconsistency between the proposed R60 coding and the surrounding locality;

·        Building heights;

·        Incompletion of Hirundo Bend; and

·        Traffic generation.

 

A more detailed discussion of the major issues considered in the assessment of Amendment No. 23 is provided below.

 

In addition to the submissions received during the advertising period one submission was received after the matter was presented to Council on 8 December 2015. This submission is also included in Attachment 3.

 

Comment

Assessment against Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy

 

The amendment area falls under ASP 3, and as such, the proposal is subject to the requirements of Clause 9(b) and Table 1 of the City's Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation (LPP 3.1). Table 1 of LPP 3.1 outlines criteria and specifies distances to infrastructure and nearby amenities which a site should meet in order for the City to support an application for re-coding of that lot. The proposal has been assessed against and is considered to satisfy the provisions of LPP 3.1 for the following reasons:

 

·        It is considered the amendment is appropriate within the broader planning framework as the Residential zone aims to provide a range of densities and a variety of housing to meet the needs of different household types.

·        The proposal is considered to satisfy the criteria of LPP 3.1 (Table 1), and summarised as follows:

o   The amendment area abuts a Neighbourhood Centre;

o   The amendment area is located within 200m of existing, high frequency bus routes;

o   The amendment area is located within 200m of Nankeen Park; and

o   The amendment area is located in close proximity to major arterial roads, both secondary and primary educational institutions as well as community facilities.

·        The proposal is generally in accordance with the objectives outlined in Part 9 of the City of Wanneroo Local Housing Strategy 2005 (LHS).

 

Key issues raised during advertising

 

Inconsistency between the proposed R60 coding and the surrounding locality

Numerous submitters raised concerns that the proposed recoding to R60 is inconsistent with the existing R20 and R30 lots in the locality. Whilst these concerns are noted, the proposal is consistent with State Government policies including WAPC’s Liveable Neighbourhoods policy and Directions 2031; and the City’s Local Planning Policy 3.1 – Local Housing Strategy Implementation (LPP 3.1). These policies promote higher residential densities in urban areas that are within close proximity to retail and employment centres, public transport services, major arterial routes, educational institutes and community facilities. The subject site abuts a neighbourhood centre, is adjacent to both a secondary and primary school and is within 200m of high frequency bus routes on Wanneroo Road.

 

The policies noted above also promote the facilitation of increased housing diversity and affordability and planning for an increased supply of housing and land in response to population growth and changing community needs.

 

In light of the above, whilst it is noted that the proposed R60 coding is a higher density than the surrounding residential development, it is considered appropriate given the context of the subject site.

 

Building Heights

Concerns were raised regarding the proposed building heights for the subject site and the impact that these heights will have on the existing residential dwellings within the locality. Whilst the amendment proposes to increase the maximum building heights for a portion of the subject lot, the proposed height limits have been designed to reduce the impact of future development on the surrounding residential development. A draft Local Development Plan illustrating the proposed building heights is included in Attachment 4. As indicated on this plan, a 4m building setback will separate the future development of the subject site from adjoining lots. In addition, staggered building height limits have been implemented to ensure that the 12m maximum building heights are setback no closer than 40 metres from the adjoining residential properties. Administration considers that these measures are appropriate and will ensure that the impact of building bulk on adjoining properties is reduced.

 

Incompletion of Hirundo Bend

Whilst the amendment does not propose any modifications to the surrounding road network, the submissions highlighted existing issues associated with the incompletion of Hirundo Bend. When ASP 3 was first adopted, Hirundo Bend extended into the subject site before connecting with Corvus Road. However, this connection was removed when Amendment No. 12 to ASP 3 was adopted and as a result, Hirundo Bend is now incomplete on the ASP 3 map as indicated in Attachments 1 and 2. Hirundo Bend has now been constructed in accordance with the ASP 3 map which has resulted in the following issues:

 

·        A lack of connectivity now exists from Hirundo Bend to Corvus Road and Clarkson Avenue. Given that the subject site abuts a neighbourhood centre and is adjacent to a school, a lack of pedestrian and cycling connection from Hirundo Bend is undesirable.

 

·        Hirundo Bend abruptly ends at the southern lot boundary of the subject site, with no cul-de-sac head or reversing bay being provided. As a result, vehicles utilising this portion of Hirundo Bend have no means of turning and exiting the road in forward gear. This issue is particularly relevant to waste collection vehicles when servicing 19 and 21 Hirundo Bend.

 

Whilst the matters noted above are not directly associated with the proposed amendment, Administration considers this application to be an opportunity to include additional provisions within the structure plan to ensure that these issues are addressed through the future development of the land. Administration has discussed the matter with the applicant and the following modifications have been proposed in order to address the issues associated with the incompletion of Hirundo Bend:

 

·        Incorporate a pedestrian access easement linking Hirundo Bend with Corvus Road to ensure that pedestrian and cycling connections are established. This pedestrian access easement should be annotated on the ASP 3 Map as well as incorporated into the structure plan text. The structure plan text should ensure that the easement is provided with surveillance and lighting which will make certain that the pedestrian connection is usable and safe.

 

·        Include a textual provision requiring the future development of the subject site to make allowance for vehicles entering Hirundo Bend to either turn within the land and re-enter Hirundo Bend in forward gear or to connect from Hirundo Bend to Corvus Road.

 

It is considered that the modifications outlined above will ensure that the issues associated with the incompletion of Hirundo Bend are addressed through the future development of the subject site. An updated proposal incorporating the modifications outlined above is included in Attachment 5 with the modifications being highlighted.

 

Traffic Generation

Concerns were raised that the increased density coding of the subject lot would potentially result in traffic congestion on the surrounding road network. An accompanying Traffic Impact Assessment (TIA) prepared by Transcore was submitted with the proposal.

 

As previously stated, the proposed recoding is estimated to increase the potential dwelling yield from 145 to 169 dwellings, resulting in an increase of 24 dwellings. Based on the Main Roads WA (MRWA) transport data, a single dwelling is assumed to generate 10 vehicle trips per day (VTPD) on average. However, the accompanying TIA considers that 8 VTPD is more suitable due to the smaller size of the future dwellings on the site on the basis that smaller dwellings are likely to hold fewer occupants and therefore will result in less traffic. If 8 VTPD was to be used, the proposal would increase the total VTPD from 1160 to 1352. Based on existing traffic patterns and attraction nodes in the surrounding locality, the TIA assumes that daily traffic will be distributed in accordance with the following:

 

·        32% of VTPD would travel south on Wanneroo Road;

·        16% of VTPD would travel north on Wanneroo Road;

·        20% of VTPD would travel east on Clarkson Avenue; and

·        32% of VTPD would travel south on Corvus Road and Hirundo Bend.

 

The City's Traffic and Transport Service Unit has assessed the TIA provided by the applicant and has confirmed that the projected traffic increases will not have a detrimental impact on the road network.

 

Having regard to the additional traffic of 192 VTPD that are anticipated to be generated by the future development of the subject area as a result of the proposed amendment, it is not considered to adversely impact on the flow of traffic in the surrounding area.

 

Additional traffic assessment

 

In light of Council’s recommendation for additional traffic assessment to be undertaken, the City commissioned consulting firm GHD to undertake a review of the TIA prepared by Transcore in order to determine whether further traffic investigation is warranted. GHD’s review, dated January 2016, endorsed the methodology used by the TIA for forecasting traffic volume increases and supported the conclusion of the TIA that the traffic impact of the proposed amendment will be minimal. The review also concluded that the forecasted increases in traffic volumes is low enough to not trigger the need to conduct further analysis in accordance with the WAPC Transport Assessment Guidelines for Development (2006).

 

In light of the conclusions presented in GHD’s review of the TIA submitted by Transcore, Administration does not consider the projected traffic increases, as a result of the proposed amendment, to warrant further traffic analysis. Administration considers that the TIA prepared by Transcore sufficiently demonstrates that the projected increases in traffic will not adversely impact traffic flow in the locality.

 

Conclusion

 

In light of the above comments, the proposed amendment is considered to be acceptable subject to the modifications included in Attachment 5. Administration therefore recommends that Council support the application subject to modifications.

Statutory Compliance

This structure plan amendment will follow the statutory process outlined in the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015. In order to meet timeframes associated with the clause 20(2)(e) of the City of Wanneroo Planning Scheme No 2 Deemed Provisions and present a report to the Western Australian Planning Commission within 60 days from the last day of advertising, Council cannot defer the proposed application and can either support the amendment, support the amendment with modifications or not support the amendment.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

This proposal has been assessed under the provisions of DPS 2, Local Planning Policy 4.2: Structure Planning and LPP 3.1.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.    Pursuant to subclause 20(2)(e) of the deemed provisions of City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, RECOMMENDS to the Western Australian Planning Commission that Amendment No. 23 to the East Wanneroo Cell 1 (Tapping and Ashby) Agreed Structure Plan No. 3 submitted by Rowe Group on behalf of Freshlink Export Pty Ltd included as Attachment 2 be approved subject to the modifications as included in Attachment 5 and SUBMITS a copy of the proposed structure plan and all accompanying material as received from the applicant;

 

2.    Pursuant to subclause 20(1) of the deemed provisions of City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, PROVIDES the Western Australian Planning Commission a copy of the report on the proposed structure plan amendment; and

 

3.    NOTES the Schedule of Submissions included in Attachment 3, ENDORSES Administration's responses to those submissions, FORWARDS the Schedule of Submissions to the Western Australian Planning Commission, and ADVISES the submitters of its decision.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Location Map

15/503259

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Existing and Proposed ASP 3 Maps and Proposed Text Modifications

15/503247

Minuted

3.

Attachment 3 - Schedule of Submissions

15/593721

Minuted

4.

Attachment 4 - Draft Detailed Area Plan

15/503263

 

5.

Attachment 5 - Updated Proposal With Modifications

15/556087

Minuted

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          57

Draft

3.10  Adoption of Amendment No. 5 to the Agreed Structure Plan No. 60

File Ref:                                              3392-05 – 16/19689

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider submissions received during public advertising of Amendment No. 5 to the Lots 1001 and 1002 Marmion Avenue Alkimos Agreed Structure Plan No. 60 (ASP 60) and adoption of the Amendment.

 

Applicant

PTS Town Planning Pty Ltd

Owner

Trinity Success Development Pty Ltd

Location

Lot 1446 (12K) Longstaff Avenue, Alkimos

Site Area

21,647m2

MRS Zoning

Urban

DPS 2 Zoning

Urban Development

ASP 60 Zoning

Commercial and Mixed Use (as per recently Council adopted Amendment No. 4) 

 

 

Background

ASP 60 makes a provision for two Activity Centres – one in the west proposed to be located on both sides of Marmion Avenue and the other to the east of the railway reserve (see Attachment 1). The net lettable area of the western Activity Centre as per Subclause 9.1.2 of ASP 60 is 2,600m2.

 

On 11 August 2015, the Director, Planning and Sustainability adopted Amendment No. 4 to ASP 60 to rezone the western Activity Centre from Centre to Commercial and Mixed Use and to;

 

·    Reword Note 2 in the Legend of Plan 3 - Zoning Plan as follows:

 

“2. The maximum Retail NLA for the combined area of the Commercial and Mixed Use Zone shall not exceed 2,600m2”; and

 

·    To make reference to 2,600m2 NLA in Sections 9.7 Precinct 6 Commercial Zone and 9.8 Precinct 7 Mixed Use of the statutory section.

Amendment No. 5 relates to a portion of the western Activity Centre and proposes to amend the abovementioned Legend and Sections 9.7 and 9.8 by increasing the NLA from 2,600 to 5,400m2.

 

On 27 August 2015, PTS Town Planning Pty Ltd, on behalf of the Northern Corridor Development Ltd lodged Amendment No. 5 to ASP 60.

 

On 29 October 2015, the Manager Planning Implementation forwarded a memorandum to all Elected Members, informing them of the proposal and Administrations intent to advertise. As such, advertising of Amendment No. 5 to ASP 60 commenced on 10 November 2015 in accordance with Clause 20 of the Deemed Provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2).

Detail

Amendment No. 5 proposes to increase the retail net lettable area (NLA) within the western activity centre from 2,600m2 to 5,400m2.

 

See Attachment 2 for the proposed Amendments to the Part 1 document for ASP 60 and Attachment 3 for the proposed Zoning Plan (once Amendment No. 4 has been endorsed by the WAPC).

Consultation

The Amendment was advertised for public comment for a period of 42 days by means of an on-site sign, an advertisement in the Wanneroo Times newspaper, the City’s website and letters written to surrounding landowners. The submission period was from 5 November 2015 to 8 December 2015. The City received seven submissions. Two submissions were from the Department of Transport and Main Roads WA who had no comments on the proposal. One submission objected to the proposal and the remaining four raised queries in regards to the Retail Sustainability Assessment (RSA). A summary of submissions received and Administration’s response are shown in Attachment 4.

Comment

Retail Assessment and Impact of Floor Space Increase on Other Centres

 

Macros Plan Dimasi (MPD) prepared an RSA for the Trinity Western Activity Centre (TWAC), Alkimos in July 2015. The purpose of the report was to investigate the potential impacts which may arise from increasing the maximum retail floor space of the centre from 2,600m2 to 5,400m2.

 

In addition to assessing the RSA as submitted by the applicant, it was referred to the City’s external consultant for review and was assessed against the City of Wanneroo’s Gravity Model. The Gravity Model analyses all figures of Net Lettable Area (NLA) within the City of Wanneroo and assesses whether an increase of NLA is viable for surrounding centres. The findings of the assessment were as follows:

 

·    While it is noted that some submissions raised concerns that the RSA provided as part of Amendment No. 5 does not take into consideration all the approved retail floor space in surrounding centres, the City’s Retail Gravity Model did take into consideration all the latest floor space allowances in both approved and draft Structure Plans in the City of Wanneroo; and 

 

·    The increased NLA of up to 5,400m2 is viable and can be accommodated. This conclusion was reached and based on four different scenarios of development of the subject and nearby centres.

 

The full assessment is included as Attachment 5.

 

Main Trade Area

 

The trade area defined for the TWAC is the extent of the Trinity Estate and reflects the location of the site at the intersection of Marmion Avenue and Santorini Promenade, as well as the surrounding centres including both existing and planned activity centres. To date, the City has approved 1,219 residential building applications in the Trinity Estate; therefore the estimated current population as per the I.D Forecast (as at 2015) is 2,440. This forecast also projects a significant population increase to 8,280 by 2023.

 

Traffic Generation

 

A concern has been raised in regards to the increase of traffic movements within the road network surrounding the subject site. As part of the proposed Amendment a traffic report was prepared by Transcore. Currently the TWAC generates 3,100 vehicles per day (vpd) and the proposed increase retail floor space will result in 6,240 vpd.

 

The future traffic flows in the report submitted by the applicant are captured in the table below.

 

Road

Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) Liveable Neighbourhoods (LN Policy) Indicative Volume (VPD)

Estimated VPD

Marmion Avenue north of Santorini Promenade 

35,000

27,000

Santorini Promenade east of Marmion Avenue

7,000

7,200

Santorini Promenade west Hollington Gardens

7,000

6,600

Santorini Promenade east Hollington Gardens

7,000

5,600

Trethowan Promenade north of Santorini Promenade

3,000

1,800

Trethowan Promenade north of the shopping centre

3,000

2,900

 

It is regarded that the traffic flows are generally consistent with the capacity ranges indicated by the LN Policy for these roads excepting for a portion of Santorini Promenade. The increase for this section of Santorini Promenade is anticipated to be 200vpd greater than that indicated in the LN Policy. As the vpd outlined in the LN Policy are indicative only the increase is not considered to be significant and will not have a negative impact on the locality.

 

State Planning Policy 4.2 – Activity Centres for Perth and Peel (SPP 4.2)

 

The subject site is considered a Neighbourhood Centre under SPP 4.2.  The main function of a Neighbourhood Centre under SPP 4.2 is to provide for daily and weekly household shopping needs, community services and a small range of other convenience services.

 

SPP 4.2 encourages a mix of land uses within centres to provide for a diversity and intensity of activity within the locality. A Neighbourhood Centre typically features supermarket/s, personal services and convenience shops. A Development Application (DA) was submitted concurrently with Amendment No. 5. This DA has been deferred by the North-West Joint Development Assessment Panel pending the adoption of this Amendment. The DA proposes; a supermarket, childcare centre, recreation centre, medical centre, and various speciality retail tenancies. As such, the proposed Amendment is considered to be consistent with SPP 4.2.

 

Local Planning Policy 3.2 – Activity Centres (LPP 3.2)

 

The City of Wanneroo's Local Planning Policy 3.2 – Activity Centres, requires planning proposals for centres to:

 

·        Provide access to a range of employment opportunities;

 

·        Not prejudice long term planning of centres; and

 

·        Encourage centres to evolve over time to fulfil their role within the SPP 4.2 hierarchy.

 

In respect to the above, Administration provides the following comments:

 

·        The RSA has demonstrated that the 5,400m2 could provide an additional 264 jobs at the TWAC. This is a net additional employment increase of 129 jobs compared with a smaller 2,600m2 centre which could provide approximately 135 jobs; and

 

·        The proposed amendment will enable the TWAC to grow and mature from a Local Centre into a Neighbourhood Centre in response to market demand.

 

Given the above, the proposed Amendment is considered to be consistent with the objectives of LPP 3.2. 

 

Conclusion

In light of the above it is concluded that the proposed Amendment to ASP 60 for an increase of NLA from 2,600m2 to 5,400m2 is considered to be acceptable for the following reasons:

1.       The RSA submitted as part of the application has been deemed acceptable against the provisions of the City of Wanneroo’s Gravity Model;

2.       Surrounding centres existing and proposed are not likely to be affected by the NLA increase of the subject site;

3.       The current road network surrounding the site is capable of carrying the proposed traffic movements; and

4.       The Amendment is consistent with the objectives of SPP 4.2 and LPP 3.2.

Therefore, Administration considers that Council should recommend approval for the Amendment without modification to the WAPC

Statutory Compliance

This Amendment has been processed in accordance with the requirements of DPS 2. It is recommended that Amendment No. 5 to the Lots 1001 and 1002 Marmion Avenue, Alkimos Agreed Structure Plan No. 60 be approved without modification pursuant to Clause 20(2) (e) of the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “3     Economy - Progressive, connected communities that enable economic growth and employment.

3.2    Growing Business - Our community is a preferred place for business to locate and grow.

 

 

Risk Management Considerations

Nil

Policy Implications

This proposal has been assessed under the provisions of the City’s District Planning Scheme No. 2, State Planning Policy 4.2 and Local Planning Policy 3.2.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council :-

1.       Pursuant to subclause 20(2)(e) of the Deemed Provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2 RECOMMENDS to the Western Australian Planning Commission that the proposed Amendment No. 5 to Lots 1001 and 1002 Marmion Avenue, Alkimos Agreed Structure Plan No. 60 (ASP 60) be APPROVED without modification; and

2.       Pursuant to subclause 20(2) of the Deemed Provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2 PROVIDES a copy of the report on the proposed Amendment to the Western Australian Planning Commission.

3.       ADVISES the submitters of its decision.

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1: Location of Western and Eastern Activity Centres in the ASP 60 Area

16/36151

 

2.

Attachment 2: Proposed Amendment to Part 1

16/29392

 

3.

Attachment 3:  Proposed Zoning Plan

16/51628

 

4.

Attachment 4: Schedule of Submissions

16/51648

 

5.

Attachment 5: Advice from Jeff Malcolm - Retail Gravity Model - Trinity Western (ASP 60) and Alkimos Coastal Village

16/18590

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          62

Draft

3.11  Consideration of Development Application (DA2015/1794) - Home Business - Category 3 at 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale

File Ref:                                              DA2015/1794 – 16/30444

Responsible Officer:                           Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

 

Issue

To consider a development application (DA2015/1794) for a Home Business – Category 3 at 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale.

 

Applicant

Yogam & Janine Naidoo

Owner

Yogam & Janine Naidoo

Location

Lot 910 (28) Huntington Parkway, Landsdale

Site Area

569m2

DPS 2 Zoning

Urban Development

ASP 57 Zoning

Residential R20

 

 

Background

On 23 September 2015, the City received a development application from the landowners of Lot 910 (28) Huntington Parkway, Landsdale, to conduct swimming lessons from their property. This proposal is considered to be a Home Business – Category 3 under the City of Wanneroo’s District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2).

 

The subject site is 569m2 in area and is zoned Urban Development under DPS 2 and Residential under Agreed Structure Plan 57 – East Wanneroo Cell 9 (ASP 57) with a density coding of R20. Under DPS 2, a Home Business – Category 3 is a discretionary ‘D’ land use within the Residential zone. A location plan of the subject site is included in Attachment 1.

Detail

·        The proposed home business involves swimming lessons in the existing backyard swimming pool.

·        Lessons will be scheduled by appointment between 3:30pm and 6:00pm Monday to Friday and between 9:00am and 12:00pm on Saturdays, between the months of October and April inclusive.

·        No lessons are proposed to operate on Sundays or public holidays.

·        There will be two students per lesson and a maximum of four lessons per day.

·        The duration of each lesson will be 20 minutes with a break of 20 minutes between each lesson.

·        The applicant has indicated that the proposed home business is intended to predominantly serve local residents, meaning that customers of the home business may walk to and from the subject site.

·        The home business will occupy a total area of 100m2, which includes the backyard swimming pool area, alfresco and an indoor toilet (see Attachment 2).

·        The proposed home business does not require any works to the existing dwelling and no signage is proposed to be displayed.

Consultation

Public notification was undertaken by the City in writing to nine surrounding landowners. Notification was conducted because the area for the home business exceeds 50m2, which is the maximum area a Home Business – Category 3 may occupy under DPS 2 without requiring public notification. Notification was undertaken for a period of 14 days commencing on 19 October 2015 and closing on 2 November 2015. One submission raising objections to the proposal was received from the landowners at 1 Annevoie Road, Landsdale. A summary of the submission is included in Attachment 3. The submission raises a concern with the potential increase in vehicular traffic in the locality as a result of the home business operating at the subject site.

Comment

Delegation to Determine Application

 

Pursuant to Part 8.3(b) of the City’s Delegated Authority Register and Sub-Delegated Authority Register, the application may be considered under delegation if, it is the view of the Operations Manager Planning and Development Services or Director, Planning and Sustainability, that the objections do not raise relevant planning considerations that cannot be specifically addressed or overcome by modifications to the proposal, or imposition of appropriate conditions of approval.

 

In this instance, Administration is of the opinion that the objection raises relevant planning considerations in relation to the potential increase in vehicular traffic in the locality. Modifications to the operation of the home business have been made by the applicant in response to the objector’s concerns, and are detailed below. Despite these modifications, the objector still has concerns with the potential increase in vehicular traffic as a result of the home business. Therefore, the application cannot be considered under delegated authority and must be determined by Council.

 

Assessment of Application

 

1.   Traffic and Parking

The main concern raised by the objector relates to the potential increase in vehicular traffic in the locality as a result of the home business operating at the subject site. In accordance with DPS 2, a Home Business – Category 3 is not to result in traffic difficulties as a result of the inadequacy of on-site and off-site parking, or result in a substantial increase in the amount of vehicular traffic in the vicinity.

 

In response to the objector’s concerns relating to the potential increase in vehicular traffic, the applicant has amended the proposed schedule for the swimming lessons. Originally, the applicant proposed four lessons in the morning and four lessons in the afternoon (Monday to Friday) with a 10 minute break between lessons. As a result of receiving the objection, the applicant has modified their proposal to remove the morning classes and extend the break between lessons to 20 minutes.

 

The amended schedule for the swimming lessons is considered to adequately address the parking requirements for a Home Business – Category 3. Each lesson will have two students and the 20 minute break between lessons is considered sufficient time to allow students from one lesson to leave before the students for the next lesson arrive. As such, there will be a maximum of two visitor cars on the property at any one time. Sufficient room is available on the driveway for two visitor cars to park, meaning that there will not be traffic difficulties on the surrounding streets as a result of inadequate on-site parking.

 

Despite the issue of parking being addressed by the amended schedule for the swimming lessons, there is still concern that the potential traffic associated with the home business is excessive. The applicant has indicated that the proposed home business is intended to predominantly serve local residents, meaning that customers of the home business may walk to and from the subject site. The proposed home business may, however, result in a maximum of eight visitor cars per day if customers were to drive to the subject site. This would potentially create an additional 16 vehicle trips per day (to and from the subject site) along Huntington Parkway. Under ASP 57, Huntington Parkway is identified as a Neighbourhood Connector. Under the Western Australian Planning Commission’s Liveable Neighbourhoods policy, the indicative traffic volume for Neighbourhood Connectors is 3000 vehicles per day. The surrounding streets which may also be used to access the subject site are identified in ASP 57 as access streets. Under the Liveable Neighbourhoods policy, the indicative traffic volume for access streets (such as those surrounding the subject site) is 1000 vehicles per day. Notwithstanding the indicative traffic volumes of the streets surrounding the subject site, the traffic generated by the proposed home business is considered excessive, given that the 16 additional vehicle trips would be concentrated over 2.5-3 hour periods. As such, the intensity of traffic associated with the home business is considered to have the potential to negatively affect the amenity of the neighbourhood during these periods.

 

2.   Other Home Business Requirements

The proposed home business complies with the requirements for a Home Business – Category 3 under DPS 2. Further comment in respect to the area occupied by the home business, however, is provided below.

 

In accordance with DPS 2, a Home Business – Category 3 may occupy an area of up to 50m2, however Council may approve an area up to 100m2, or one third the area of the dwelling, whichever is the lesser, subject to community consultation. As the proposed home business occupies an area of 100m2, the application was advertised to surrounding landowners. Whilst no objections were received in relation to the size of the home business, Administration considers that the area for the proposed home business is excessive, given that it is greater than one third the area of the dwelling. As such, it is not recommended that the 50m2 prescribed in DPS 2 for the maximum size of the home business be varied.

 

3.   Pool Safety and Water Quality Requirements

 

Pool Safety Requirements

Typically, a swimming pool intended only for private use requires a pool fencing inspection to be conducted by the City every four years. In the most recent inspection of the pool (11 March 2014) the pool fencing was deemed to comply with the City’s standards. As a condition of any planning approval issued, the applicant will be required to arrange yearly pool fencing inspections. Furthermore, a condition will be imposed on any planning approval issued, requiring a pool inspection to be carried out prior to the home business commencing. These additional requirements will ensure more frequent monitoring of the safety of the pool fencing.

 

Janine Naidoo, one of the landowners of the subject site, is the sole employee of the proposed home business and has provided an up-to-date Working with Children Check and an AUSTSWIM Teacher Licence. The AUSTSWIM Teacher Licence is recognised as the industry standard for swimming and water safety teachers. AUSTSWIM teachers may be randomly audited by AUSTSWIM. During a random audit, the teacher may be required to provide evidence of professional development, practical teaching hours and CPR qualifications. In the event that a random audit takes place and the teacher is found by AUSTSWIM to not comply with requirements of their licence, then AUSTSWIM may suspend the teacher’s licence until such time as the teacher can show that they do comply with the requirements. In addition to the requirement for an AUSTSWIM Teacher Licence, the practice of auditing by AUSTSWIM provides a means of continual monitoring of the teacher’s ability to safely conduct swimming lessons.

 

Water Quality Requirements

In addition to the pool fencing requirements for the private use of the pool, the use of the pool for the home business is considered an ‘Aquatic Facility’ under the Health (Aquatic Facilities) Regulations 2007. As such, the following requirements also need to be satisfied by the applicant:

 

·    Submit detailed plans and specifications of the proposed Aquatic Facility to the Executive Director, Public Health for approval prior to commencement of the home business.

·    Once approval has been granted by the Executive Director, Public Health, the applicant is required to maintain an Aquatic Facility Operations Manual for the pool. The Aquatic Facility Operations Manual is used to record details of the pool, including the results of ongoing water quality tests, as well as details of any chemicals kept on site.

·    An Environmental Health Officer from the City is required to visit the property on a monthly basis in order to conduct water sampling and testing of the pool, to check the pool fence and gate, and to review the Aquatic Facility Operations Manual. Should the water quality of the pool not comply with the Health (Aquatic Facilities) Regulations 2007, the City’s Environmental Health Officers have delegated power from the Executive Director, Public Health, to direct the applicant to close the pool until water quality is compliant with the Health (Aquatic Facilities) Regulations 2007.

 

These requirements for a swimming pool operating as an Aquatic Facility will ensure that the water quality of the pool is constantly monitored.  

 

Conclusion

In light of the above, the proposed swimming lessons to be conducted at 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale are not considered to meet the requirements of a Home Business – Category 3, as set out in DPS 2. Namely, the intensity of the traffic generated by the proposed home business is considered to be above that normally associated with a home business, and therefore may potentially have a negative effect on the amenity of the neighbourhood. Additionally, a variation to the 50m2 prescribed in DPS 2 for the maximum size of a home business is not supported. Administration considers that the issue raised in the letter of objection have not been addressed. It is therefore recommended that Council refuse the proposed Home Business – Category 3.

Statutory Compliance

This application has been assessed in accordance with the City of Wanneroo’s District Planning Scheme No. 2.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.2    Healthy and Active People - We get active in our local area and we have many opportunities to experience a healthy lifestyle.

 

Rick Management Considerations

 

There are no Strategic or Corporate risks within the City’s existing risk registers which relates to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

 

Nil

Financial Implications

 

Nil

Voting Requirements

 

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council REFUSES the development application for the Home Business – Category 3 at Lot 910 (28) Huntington Parkway, Landsdale, pursuant to Clause 68(2)(b) of the Deemed Provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 for the following reasons:

1.       The proposed Home Business – Category 3 exceeds the maximum floor area stated in Clause 1.9 of District Planning Scheme No. 2. 

2.       The intensity of the traffic generation of the proposed home business is considered to be above that normally associated with a home business and may negatively affect the amenity of the neighbourhood.

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Location Plan - 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale

15/590726

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Site Plan - 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale

16/6442

 

3.

Attachment 3 - Summary of Submission - 28 Huntington Parkway, Landsdale

16/61928

 

 

 

 

 

   


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          67

Draft

Assets

Asset Operations & Services

3.12  PT04-11/14 - Sandison Way, Landsdale, Road Network Analysis

File Ref:                                              3120V03 – 15/594988

Responsible Officer:                           Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To consider the results of an investigation of the road network and traffic movements in the vicinity of Sandison Way, Landsdale.

 

Background

Council, at its meeting of 11 November 2014, received petition PT04-11/14 signed by 119 residents representing 80 properties. The petition read as follows;

 

“WE, the undersigned, all being residents of the City of Wanneroo do formally request Council’s consideration on;

a)    Addressing the management of traffic flow through intersection and turns along Sandison Way Landsdale and neighbouring streets.

b)    In particular the intersection of Sandison Way and Raeburn Cr, by widening the intersection through reducing the footpath on the North West section of the intersection (as highlighted by the attachment and the installation of solid road line marking or traffic island on the bend.

c)    Request the City of Wanneroo to provide residents along Sandison Way Landsdale and neighbouring streets a range of options on addressing the above issues (including speeding throughout the area)”.

 

Of the 80 properties represented;

·    10 were from properties along Sandison Way;

·    44 were from other properties within a 300m radius of Sandison Way;

·    8 were from properties outside the 300m radius; and

·    18 were from non-residents of the City of Wanneroo.

 

Refer to Attachment 1 for a locality map showing the location of Sandison Way and the roads which were investigated as part of this issue.

 

Council considered Item No IN02-09/15 at its meeting on 28 April 2015 in response to the petition and resolved to refer the matter back to Administration for further investigation of the road network and traffic movements in the area and report back to Council.

 

Further traffic analysis has now been undertaken and this report provides the outcomes of the analysis and recommendations.

Detail

In accordance with Liveable Neighbourhoods, residential roads are built and designed to accommodate traffic volumes to service the area by connecting the arterial road network to homes. Traffic volumes expected in residential streets in accordance with Liveable Neighbourhoods are defined as being:

 

 

Function

Street Type

Max Design Speed/Target Operating Speed (km/hr)

Indicative Volume

(vehicles per day)

Indicative Pavement width (metres)

Neighbourhood Connectors

Streets with mostly residential frontage that typically provide the lower order sub-arterial network. These streets service and link neighbourhoods and towns.

Neighbourhood Connector A (Median)

50 / 50

7000

2x 7.1m

Neighbourhood Connector B

(Minor)

50 / 50

3000

11.2m

Access Street

Access Streets are to accommodate shared pedestrian, bike and vehicular movements. The requirements of adjacent land uses should be supported through street design.

Access street A

50 / 40

3000

2x 3.5m = 7m; or

2x 3.6m = 7.2m

Access Street B

50 / 40

3000

9.7m

Access Street C

50 / 40

3000

7.2m – 7.5m

Access Street D

50 / 30

1000

5.5m – 6m

 

The City undertook traffic counts in August 2015 along various roads in the vicinity of Sandison Way to ascertain whether traffic volumes were higher than expected or above capacity. The classification of the roads and the results recorded are shown in the table below;

 

Street Name, Location

Street Type

Recorded Traffic Volume

Recorded 85% Speed*

Priest Road, south of Valley Views Gardens

Access Street D

362vpd

40km/hr

Priest Road, east of Pilbeam Circuit

Access Street D

310 vpd

49km/hr

Firmstone Circle, east of Sandison Way

Access Street D

426 vpd

41km/hr

Warradale Terrace, south of Priest Road

Access street A

1316 vpd

50km/hr

Southmead Drive, east of Bancroft Ramble

Access street A

1774 vpd

47km/hr

Southmead Drive, west of Asheville Parade

Access street A

2924 vpd

49km/hr

*85% Speed refers to the speed at or below which 85% of drivers are travelling.

 

A map detailing the recorded traffic count data and the counter locations is referred at Attachment 2.

 

With comparison against Liveable Neighbourhoods design guidelines, the traffic volumes recorded along each road was below the indicative traffic volumes for which the roads are designed to accommodate. In addition, the recorded 85% speeds also indicate that the roads are operating at or below the speeds limits for each road being the default built-up-area speed limit of 50km/hr.

Consultation

As no traffic management options were considered necessary after the completion of the analysis, no consultation with the community was undertaken.  As explained in the Comments section of this report, Administration is proposing to further investigate an option for the installation of separation kerb near the Sandison Way/Raeburn Crescent intersection.  Should this option be feasible, adjoining residents will be consulted in accordance with the City’s Community Consultation and Engagement Policy.

Comment

At the time of preparing the report to Council in April 2015, some residents of Sandison Way also highlighted the following issues at the Sandison Way/Raeburn Crescent intersection:

·    Motorists observed cutting the corner and encroaching on the opposite side of the road when heading north along Sandison Way from Southmead Drive to Firmstone Circuit.

·    Motorists observed cutting across the exit lane from Raeburn Crescent when turning right into Raeburn Crescent from Sandison Way.

·    Motorists exiting Raeburn Crescent not giving way to through traffic on Sandison Way.

 

As far as the issues raised regarding the Sandison Way/Raeburn Crescent intersection are concerned, Administration notes that these are typical driver behaviour issues and motorists are expected to drive in accordance with the rules stated in the Road Traffic Code 2000 and with consideration of the condition of the road.  This issue would generally be addressed through the installation of medians on approaches to the intersection to enforce lane compliance; however this option is not suitable in this case due to the narrow lane widths of Raeburn Crescent and Sandison Way. In this instance, the City will investigate a trial installation of separation kerb along the centre of Sandison Way through the bend at the Raeburn Crescent intersection to assist motorists to be lane compliant when negotiating the bend and when turning at the Raeburn Crescent/Sandison Way intersection.  Administration will need to prepare a concept design and determine if the installation of separation kerb will impact on the movement of larger vehicles, such as the City’s waste vehicles, through the bend. Subject to the feasibility, the installation of such kerb can be undertaken during June 2016.

 

The recorded traffic counts indicate that the above listed roads in the vicinity of Sandison Way are all operating well below their design traffic volumes. In addition, the recorded 85% speeds also indicate that the majority of motorists are driving in accordance with the default area built-up residential speed limit of 50km/hr.

 

Administration believes that with consideration of the recorded traffic count data in comparison to the design criteria set in accordance with Liveable Neighbourhoods, that no action be taken. The Sandison Way/Raeburn Crescent intersection and adjoining roads have been designed and constructed in accordance with the relevant standards and no modifications are considered necessary.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “3     Economy - Progressive, connected communities that enable economic growth and employment.

3.3    Easy to Get Around - The community is well connected and accessible with an integrated transport approach for all.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

The installation of separation kerbing is expected to be in the order of $10,000 and can be undertaken from the allocations made in Project No PR-2656 - Traffic Management Projects (Various).

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       NOTES that the traffic volumes and vehicle speeds in Sandison Way and adjoining streets are below the road capacities as stipulated in Liveable Neighbourhoods and the built up area speed limits and DOES NOT consider any further works in these streets other than those proposed in item two below;

2.       NOTES that subject to a successful outcome of the feasibility for the installation of separation kerb along the centre of Sandison Way in the immediate vicinity of Raeburn Crescent, to enforce lane compliance through the bend, works will be undertaken during June 2016; and

3.       ADVISES the petition organiser of Council’s decision.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Sandison Way, Landsdale - Locality Plan - road network review

15/597132

 

2.

Sandison Way - Road network Review - TC Results

15/597198

 

   


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          71

Draft

Infrastructure Capital Works

3.13  PT02-10/15 - Erect a Permanent Solid Wall along the Newly Realigned Lenore Road between East Road and Nicholas Road, Hocking

File Ref:                                              20203 – 16/53070

Responsible Officer:                           Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider PT02-10/15 to erect a permanent solid wall along the newly realigned Lenore Road between East Road and Nicholas Road, Hocking.

 

Background

Council, at its meeting on 13 October 2015, received petition PT02-10/15 signed by 103 owner/occupiers residing in the vicinity of the current Lenore Road upgrade works between East Road and Nicholas Road, Hocking. The petition reads:

Erection of a permanent solid wall along the newly realigned Lenore Road that runs from East Road to Nicholas Roads Hocking to serve as a safety and privacy barrier and traffic noise buffer. Due to the realignment of Lenore Road, houses in this locality are now only metres away from a very busy main road, thus the safety and living environment of local residents has been greatly impacted and negatively compromised. The City of Wanneroo’s proposal of implementing only a nature strip will not serve any purpose at all, except as a means to cut costs at the expense of the safety, living environment and privacy of local residents.

 

PQ04-10/15 prefaced this petition and raised questions that will be addressed within the content of this report.

 

Detail

The City has received enquiries over the past few months from residents in Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive, associated with the Lenore Road Upgrade Project. Both run parallel with Lenore Road between East Road to Nicholas Road, Hocking (refer Attachment 1). The residents’ primary concerns relate to the potential loss of amenity, lateral separation and removal of existing vegetation within the Lenore Road reserve.

 

Due to site constraints, and to meet the design requirements, the majority of the existing vegetation buffer between the parallel roads was required to be removed during construction to accommodate services and the installation of a new shared path at the correct levels. Stage 1 of Lenore Road to East Road was also recently completed, giving adjoining residents an indication of the proximity of the new road. The new carriageway for Lenore Road is positioned to accommodate future upgrades of Lenore Road to its ultimate dual carriageway configuration.

 

The City has not previously undertaken the installation of fencing or solid barriers between parallel local and major roads to avoid compromising the planning and design principles envisaged through the original structure plan. The planning principles adopted seek to maintain an open vista with unimpeded access, and to facilitate crime prevention through the provision of passive surveillance opportunities between both roads.  Furthermore, solid barriers can create isolated areas that do not interact with the adjacent developments or public transport links. The current design provides for three pedestrian path connections from Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive to link with the shared path network that will be constructed along Lenore Road. 

 

Historically, the City provides a vegetated landscape buffer as a natural transition and separation between the two road reserves. Replanting of a vegetated buffer is proposed to improve the visual aspects for drivers using Lenore Road and help to reinstate the amenity for adjacent residents as the vegetation becomes more established. 

 

This approach is consistent with the planning principles applied when approving land development projects adjacent to such roads, unless there are level differences to be overcome. It should be noted a level difference has occurred within a short section on the first stage of Lenore Road (Pinot Loop), which is separated by a retaining wall with a new fence being erected at the developer’s cost. The colorbond fence installed on a retaining wall adjacent to the market garden on Lenore Road south of East Road is as a result of a condition of sale for the acquisition from the landowner.

 

There are numerous examples of the application of these design principles being applied across the City for many of the local roads running parallel to major roads ie Hepburn Avenue, Hartman Drive, Mirrabooka Avenue, Ocean Reef Road, Pinjar Road, Joondalup Drive, Marmion Avenue and Connolly Drive. Within the Lenore Road Project, it is noted that Osaka Loop is a local road that runs parallel with Lenore Road north of Nicholas Road. Currently a vegetation buffer exists between the two roads, that to date has not precipitated a request for construction of a fence or solid barrier.

 

In reference to safety concerns regarding the extent of separation between Lenore Road traffic lanes and the adjoining subdivisional road reserves, it is advised the current design of Lenore Road will provide approximately 20m of separation from the property boundary of residences in Moscow Retreat/Toledo Drive to the edge of the traffic lane on Lenore Road. The current design provides a minimum 10m between the edges of parallel roads, which exceeds the requirements for clear zone recommended in the Guide to Road Design – Part 6: Roadside Design, Safety and Barriers. While the standard cannot cover every situation or guarantee that accidental intrusion will not occur, it does assess this risk of occurrence as low and therefore does not warrant barriers or solid walls.

 

With respect to noise, the following detail is provided to demonstrate the City’s compliance to relevant policies:

 

The City arranged a Traffic Noise Assessment in February 2011 as part of the design process for Lenore Road.

 

Results of the traffic noise modelling using the projected traffic volumes for 2031 identified that noise levels would exceed the Outdoor Noise Criteria in the Western Australian State Planning Policy (SPP5.4) covering Road and Rail Transport Noise and Freight Consideration in Land Use Planning.  The subdivision of properties on Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive was approved in 2006 prior to the implementation of Policy SPP5.4 in 2009.

 

Recent legal advice confirmed the Policy only applies to major roads, which are defined as one of the following:

·        State roads and national highways under the (Care Control and Management by MRWA);

·        Urban primary distributors, as described on the metropolitan functional road hierarchy network;

·        Other urban roads carrying more than 20,000 vehicles per day (vpd);

·        Other rural primary distributors carrying more than 5,000vpd; and

·    Primary freight roads in the Perth metropolitan region, southwest region or state-wide

 

Lenore Road is therefore not a major road for the purposes of the Policy, and the City is accordingly not bound by the policy in this circumstance. Alternatively Council may wish to exercise its discretion to apply element of the policy when the City undertakes major redevelopment work in the future to dual the carriageways of Lenore Road and when the traffic volumes exceed the 20,000vpd threshold for a major road.  Please note any discretionary application of the policy at this stage could set an undesirable precedent for similar requests to be applied retrospectively as well as for the future, and then become a cost impost to road construction improvements 

 

Lenore road is considered an ‘Other Regional Road’ under the Metropolitan Functional Road Hierarchy Network, which means (amongst other things) that it is managed by a local authority as opposed to Main Roads WA. Therefore, the only way it could be considered a 'major' road for the purposes of the Policy was if it carried more than 20,000 vehicles per day with Lenore Road currently carrying 14,800 VPD and projected to increase to 29,000VPD dependent of the rate of development within the East Wanneroo District Structure Plan Area.

 

By request, the City has investigated several fence and solid wall options, as well as the scheduled landscaping during the 2015/2016 financial year. The options include rural type fencing, colorbond fencing, pool fencing, precast post and panel wall system and a limestone block wall option for a nominal length of 560m, which is the length requirement for the Moscow Retreat/Toledo Drive section.

 

The options vary in their suitability and effectiveness in addressing the following:

·                Noise attenuation

·                Aesthetics and amenity

·                Connectivity to the path network

·                Safety

·                Security and privacy features

·                Cost of implementation

 

Current Option - current landscaping allocation of $80,000 has been approved in 2015/2016 Capital Works Budget for the Lenore Road project from East Road to High Road. This option primarily allows for aesthetics and amenity, as well as connectivity to the path network. A landscaping plan for Lenore Road has been prepared with the purpose of replacing the trees removed earlier in the Moscow/Toledo section, as well as planting of tubestock for the remaining areas of Lenore Road. This work is scheduled to occur around the middle of 2016, and includes at least 63 trees (45 litre size) and tubestock planting. However, the maturity of the trees will not be the same until some years later, but based on what has been achieved opposite Osaka Loop, is able to provide an adequate buffer/screen between the two roads. It should also be noted that the wooden bollards have been installed in accordance with the original approved design.

 

Option 1 - rural type fencing 1.2m high for an estimated cost of $37,000 and enhanced landscaping at a further cost of $15,000. This option primarily allows for landscape protection in support of aesthetics and amenity, but provides no noise attenuation. Path connectivity could occur with this option, which may then compromise perceived safety, security and privacy.

 

Option 2 - colorbond fencing 1.8m high for an estimated cost of $51,000. This option primarily allows for privacy, with limited noise attenuation and little passive surveillance. Connectivity to the path network will also compromise any perceived security and privacy issues. This type of fencing is easily damaged and a target for graffiti.

 

Option 3 - pool type fencing 1.2m high for an estimated cost of $84,000. This option primarily allows for aesthetics and amenity associated with the open fencing, but provides no noise attenuation. Path connectivity should also occur with this option, which will compromise any perceived security and privacy issues.

 

Option 4 - precast concrete post and panel system 1.8m high for an estimated cost of $564,000. This option allows for privacy with limited noise attenuation and little passive surveillance, resulting in an isolate area unless path connections are provided, which in turn will compromise any perceived security and privacy issues. This system was used by Main Roads WA on Roe Highway Stages 4 and 5, with the panels coated with patterns agreed to in consultation with residents on the property side of the wall and artistic patterns on the road side of the wall. A lesser quality product comprising of steel posts and precast concrete hollow panels is also available, and is a more functional product than aesthetic, resulting in a 10-15% reduction in overall cost. This type of system could also attract graffiti.

 

Option 5 - limestone block wall 1.8m high for an estimated cost of $397,500. This option allows for privacy with limited noise attenuation and little passive surveillance, resulting in an isolate area unless path connections are provided, which in turn will compromise any perceived security and privacy issues, This type of noise wall was used extensively in the construction of the Kwinana Freeway extension and Forrest Highway. Using limestone blocks will create the illusion that the proposed wall is a continuation of the existing wall thereby providing a consistent aesthetic for road users on the Lenore Road side of the wall, though not necessarily for the Moscow Retreat/Toledo Drive residents. This type of system could also attract graffiti.

 

It should be noted for Options 4 and 5 that a height of 3m would provide the maximum benefit of noise attenuation at this location, and the cost will increase by about 40%.

Consultation

The planned upgrade and function of Lenore Road as an Other Regional Road has been public knowledge for some considerable time with the City and West Australian Planning Commission conducting separate community consultation processes dating as far back as 2004 in relation to development of the area.

 

In 2004, the City consulted with the community as part of Council’s consideration of the Structure Plan (the Plan) which included details of the proposed road hierarchy and function of Lenore Road, with the adopted structure plan being used to guide development of the Hocking/Pearsall area. In 2011, the Western Australian Planning Commission commenced further public consultation for the East Wanneroo Structure Plan which again confirmed the status and proposed alignment of Lenore Road.

 

In January 2015 the City notified residents in accordance with Sections 3.50(4) and 3.51 of the Local Government Act 1995 relating to closure of thoroughfares and level and alignment changes, inclusive of associated impact on affected property owners/occupiers and the general public. The City placed a public notice in the 'Wanneroo Times" and "Joondalup/Wanneroo Weekender" newspapers on 13 and 15 January 2015. The notice also advised the residents of the City’s intention to carry out construction works associated with the realignment and alteration to the level of Lenore Road between East Road and High road during the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 financial years.

 

The public notice also advised that a "Public Information Session" would be held on 28 January 2015 and requested submissions from residents on the proposed temporary road closure and the alteration to Lenore Road alignment and levels to be forwarded to the City by no later than 6 February 2015. The public notice and the letter to property owners/occupiers included a plan showing the location and extent of the proposed work on Lenore Road and the local road network to enable road users to identify detours during the temporary closure of Nicholas Road at its intersection with Lenore Road.

 

Public Information Sessions were held on 28 January 2015 at 6:00pm at the City's Civic Centre (Leschenaultia Room), with 17 attendees registering their attendance. Administration provided the community with a briefing on the proposed realignment and upgrade of Lenore Road and temporary closure of Nicholas Road. The discussion indicated that there was no objection on the temporary closure of Nicholas Road but concerns were raised by the residents in relation to the impact of the proposed road construction including:

 

-      Possible structural damages to the adjacent buildings during construction;

 

-      Increased noise level and reduce safety; and

 

-      Removal of vegetation due to proposed realignment of the new Lenore Road carriageway closer to the western boundary of the road reserve, particularly the along Osaka Loop where the removal of trees was considered by the residents affected to impact on noise levels and jeopordise public safety.

 

These concerns were submitted to the City by 6 February 2015 as part of six submissions received.  The submissions and concerns raised were reviewed and categorised into five categories; Technical Advice, Structure/Building, Environmental, Safety and Public Relations.

 

Following an initial review of the concerns submitted, it was decided to organise a community workshop to further discuss the community concerns raised in the public information session and subsequent submissions. A Public Notice was placed in the "Joondalup/Wanneroo Weekender" newspapers on 19 February 2015 advising of the City’s intention to hold a community workshop at 6.30pm on 25 February 2015 to further discuss and resolve the community concerns in relation to the project. Property owners/occupiers located in properties immediately adjacent to the proposed works were also notified by mail of the proposed community workshop.

 

The community workshop was held at the City's Civic Centre (Leschenaultia Room), with 26 attendees registering their attendance. The issues and concerns raised in the previous public information session and subsequent submissions presented in response to the Public Notice advertised on 13 and 15 January 2015, with the deadline for submissions closing on 6 February 2015. The submissions received were grouped and discussed in detail at the community workshop, with all concerns addressed and resolved, including the concerns by the residents of the properties along Osaka Loop about the removal of the vegetation along the boundary with the Lenore Road, road reserve. 

The outcomes were included in a report and considered by Council at its meeting on 31 March 2015, Item No IN09-03/15 refers.

Comment

Lenore Road is classified as an Other Regional Road with traffic volumes around 14,800 vpd (May 2014). Administration does not recommend construction of a solid noise wall (Options 4 and 5) for the following reasons:

 

·        The Policy does not apply retrospectively to developments prior to 2009;

·        The Policy only applies only applies to major roads, carrying in excess of 20,000 VPD and in instance Lenore Road currently carries approximately 14,800 VPD;

·        The Policy is generally not used for increases in traffic noise as a result of increased traffic volumes, as is the case for Lenore Road;

·        Noise walls defeat the purpose of urban planning objectives that are focussed on maintaining an open vista with unimpeded access, and to facilitate crime prevention through urban design principles; and,

·        It is the general practice of most Council to avoid establishing precedence that may be requested to apply retrospectively as well as for the future, and then become a cost impost to road construction improvements.

 

It is noted that the Western Australian Planning Commission is conditioning land subdivisional development applications that are located adjacent to arterial road alignments such that noise attenuation is to be incorporated within the subdivisional and building development design to mitigate the need for any future noise wall construction.

 

Administration does not recommend the construction of fencing (Option 2 and 3) at this location for the following reasons:

 

·        Limited effectiveness in terms of safety, security and privacy;

·        Varying aesthetic and amenity values;

·        Impermeable fencing such as colorbond defeats the purpose of urban planning objectives that focusses on maintaining an open vista with unimpeded access, and to facilitate crime prevention through sound urban design principles; and,

·        It is the general practice of most Council's, so as to avoid establishing precedence that may be requested to apply retrospectively as well as for the future, and then become a cost impost to road construction improvements.

 

It is considered enhanced landscaping supported by protective rural type fencing (Option 1) provides a better overall outcome with the following characteristics:

 

·        Perceived noise attenuation as the vegetation buffer becomes more fully established;

·        Improves the natural aesthetics and amenity;

·        Provides connectivity to the path network;

·        Provides security, passive surveillance and privacy features; and

·        Cost effective solution to implement.

Statutory Compliance

In 2009, the Western Australian Planning Commission developed State Planning Policy 5.4 Road and Rail Transport Noise and Freight Consideration in Land Use Planning (SPP5.4 or the Policy) for major roads.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “4     Civic Leadership - Working with others to ensure the best use of our resources.

4.2    Working With Others - The community is a desirable place to live and work as the City works with others to deliver the most appropriate outcomes.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There is no existing strategic or corporate risk within the City’s existing risk register that relates to the issue contained in this report.

Policy Implications

The City’s Accounting Policy Section 3(g)(c) states:

 

          “Circumstances:

           …the budget allocation for a capital work project is insufficient.

 

          Action:

          In accordance with Section 6.8 of the Local Government Act 1995 by way of a report and recommendation to the Council seeking authorisation of the expenditures and to endorse the necessary budget variation.”

Financial Implications

The cost to install fencing or solid walls on Lenore Road adjacent to Toledo Drive and Moscow Retreat is summarised as follows:

 

OPTION

ESTIMATED COST

Current Option – Landscaping for 2015/2016 CWP

$80,000

Option 1 – Rural type fencing + enhanced landscaping

$52,000

Option 2 – Colorbond fencing

$51,000

Option 3 – Pool fencing

$84,000

Option 4 – Precast post & panel wall (1.8m)

$564,000

Option 4 – Precast post & panel wall (3.0m)

$940,000

Option 5 – Limestone block wall (1.8m)

$397,500

Option 5 – Limestone block wall (3.0m)

$662,500

 

Should Council resolve to exercise its discretion to support the petitioners request to erection of a permanent solid wall along the newly realigned Lenore Road, it will establish a precedent for similar requests or retrospective application of these standards for other roads throughout the City that would be difficult to resist. Works of this nature are not covered by Cell contributions from developers which are specific in the activity undertaken and does not include landscaping, fencing or walls, that would need to be funded by the City. Furthermore, the City has not identified funds within its Long Term Capital Works Program to provide for the construction of a solid wall or fencing on Lenore Road as per the petitioners request.

 

Subject to Council’s decision, the installation of the rural type fencing and enhanced landscaping will be scheduled to be undertaken prior to 30 June 2016.

 

Project No PR-3004 has a funding allocation of $80,000 in the 2015/2016 approved Capital Works Budget for landscaping works. Should Council support the rural type fencing and enhanced landscaping, additional funding of $52,000 will need to be allocated. It is proposed to reallocate $52,000 from Project No PR-1661 – Irrigation Infrastructure Replacement Program to Project Number PR-3004 noting that Project Number  PR-1661 is likely to have surplus funding available after the delivery of all projects scheduled in this program.

 

The additional $52,000 will be expended in July 2016 which allows for Council to allocate the additional funding in 2016/2017 financial year.

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       NOTES that State Planning Policy 5.4 (SSP 5.4) addresses transport noise from within major transport corridors as defined by the Metropolitan Regional Fictional Road Hierarchy and does not apply to roadworks on Local Roads carried out by local government, because those works are carried out as 'public works' and are exempt from the need to obtain planning approvals or comply with planning schemes. As such, SPP 5.4 has no statutory jurisdiction or application over roadworks carried out by local governments, including in the case of Lenore Road. 

 

2.       DOES NOT SUPPORT the construction of a solid noise attenuation wall along the boundary of Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive adjacent to Lenore Road at an estimated cost of between $397,500 and $940,000 (Options 4 and 5);

 

3.       DOES NOT SUPPORT the construction of permanent fencing along the boundary of Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive adjacent to Lenore Road at an estimated cost of between $51,000 and $84,000 (Options 2 and 3);

 

4.       ENDORSES the current landscaping budget of $80,000 for Lenore Road between East Road and High Road within the 2015/2016 Capital Works Program;

 

5.       SUPPORTS the construction of rural type fencing (Option 1) and enhanced landscaping along the boundary of Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive adjacent to Lenore Road at an estimated cost of $52,000;

 

6.       APPROVES BY ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the over expenditure of $52,000 subject to Section 6.8(1)(b) of the Local Government Act 1995 and in accordance with the City’s Accounting Policy Section 3(g)(c) and APPROVES the following budget amendment:

Description

GL Account/

Capital Project

Current Budget

Adjusted Budget

Irrigation Infrastructure Replacement Program

PR-1661

$2,650,000

$2,598,000

Street Landscaping – Lenore Road, Hocking

PR-3004

$80,000

$132,000

and

 

7.       ADVISES property owner/occupiers of properties in Moscow Retreat and Toledo Drive, Hocking of Council's decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 Locality Plan

16/5519

 

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          79

Draft

3.14  Marathon Loop/Gnangara Road Madeley - Vehicle Accessibility - Community Consultation Assessment

File Ref:                                              7891 – 16/17509

Responsible Officer:                           Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider the results of the community consultation for the proposed accessibility improvements for the North Madeley Residential Precinct.

 

Background

The North Madeley Residential Precinct (NMRP) is a residential area bounded by Wanneroo Road, Gnangara Road, Windsor Road and the proposed Gnangara Road re-alignment. A location map of the subject site is shown in Attachment 1. The precinct has only one vehicle access, Buffalo Avenue off Gnangara Road. A second vehicle access to the precinct will be constructed from Buffalo Avenue north to the realigned Gnangara Road in future.  

 

The realignment of Gnangara Road has been delayed as Main Roads WA (MRWA) did not support a four-way intersection created by the realigned Gnangara Road, at its existing intersection Wanneroo Road, and Whitfords Avenue. MRWA advised that due to required levels-of-service for traffic along Wanneroo Road, MRWA will only support a grade-separated interchange for the proposed intersection, leaving the NMRP with only one vehicle access and increasing traffic volumes due to ongoing residential developments.

 

More recent advice from MRWA indicates that an at-grade, four-way intersection is supported, however due to funding and land acquisition issues, subsequent design/construction cannot be progressed by MRWA in the foreseeable future.

 

The City has conducted two community consultations based on proposals to improve accessibility to this precinct. The first consultation was held in June 2015 and followed by two community information sessions on 22 October and 2 December 2015. A second community consultation was undertaken in January 2016 to gain a better understanding of the community’s expectations and to introduce a new option to improve accessibility.

 

In relation to this second community consultation, Council, at its meeting of 2 February 2016, considered Item No AS03-01/16 and resolved as following:

 

1.       NOTES that the Acting Chief Executive Officer and the Mayor, In accordance with Delegation 2.5.: Authority to Make Decisions on Behalf of the City during Council Recess, authorised the undertaking of a further community consultation (from 18January 2016 to 8 February 2016) to seek the community’s feedback on the following three accessibility options for the Madeley Residential Precinct:

 

a)    Option A - Left-In at Marathon Loop West/Gnangara Road intersection and Full Intersection at Marathon Loop East as shown in the City’s drawing no. 3128-1-1;

b)    Option B - Left-In at Marathon Loop West/Gnangara Road intersection and Emergency Access Driveway at Marathon Loop East as shown in the City’s Drawing No. 3128-6-0; and

 

c)    Option C - Left-In at Marathon Loop West/Gnangara Road intersection and construction of an access road from the north end of Buffalo Avenue, north to Gavranich Way, as shown in the City’s drawing no. 3128-9-0;

 

2.       NOTES that a report on the outcome of the further community consultation is scheduled to be presented at the next Ordinary Council meeting to be held on 1 March 2016.

Detail

After considering the concerns expressed by the community from the earlier consultation and two community information sessions, Administration provided the following three feasible options to improve accessibility:

Option description

Option provision

Option A - Left-In at Marathon Loop West from Gnangara Road and a full Intersection at Marathon Loop East as shown in the City’s drawing no. 3128-1-1 (refer Attachment 2).

Provides a full movement access to the area for residential vehicles and emergency vehicles

Option B - Left-In at Marathon Loop West from Gnangara Road and an Emergency Access Driveway at Marathon Loop East as shown in the City’s drawing no. 3128-6-0 (refer Attachment 3).

Provides left in access to the area for residential vehicles and an additional full movement access for emergency vehicles

Option C - Left-In at Marathon Loop West from Gnangara Road and the construction of an access road from the north end of Buffalo Avenue, north to Gavranich Way, as shown in the City’s drawing no. 3128-9-0 (refer Attachment 4).

Provides a full movement access to the area for residential vehicles and emergency vehicles

Consultation

In January 2016, the City conducted a community consultation to gauge community’s view on the preferred option to improve the vehicle accessibility to the precinct. This consultation requested residents’ preferred option and comments. The community consultation took the form of 238 letters to all property owners/occupiers of the precinct and the City’s website (refer Attachment 5).

 

City officers were available on site on 1 February 2016 from 3 - 6pm to provide additional information and respond to community questions in relation to the options presented. Fifteen residents took the opportunity to meet with the City’s officers during this time and received clarifications and information. It was stressed to attendees that in the interests of fairness to all residents, only responses returned to the City as part of the community consultation process would be considered.

 

Consultation began on 18 January 2016 and closed on 8 February 2016 and attracted 50 responses. After allowing a maximum of two responses from each residence, one owner and one occupier, the number of responses reduced to 45, representing a response rate of 19%. This reduction did not change the result of the consultation as Option C was a clear favourite as summarised below:

 

·        Option A received 12 responses in support – 27%

·        Option B received   7 responses in support – 15%

·        Option C received 26 responses in support – 58%

 

Survey respondents were also given the option to provide additional comments for consideration by the Administration. The comments relevant to improving the accessibility of the NMRP have been reviewed and considered by Administration and are listed below:

Respondents Comments

Administrations Response

The results of the first consultation supported Option A and therefore this option should stand. 

Council resolved at its meeting on 13 October 2015 to defer the consideration of the options presented to allow for a further meeting with residents.

Roundabout required on Gnangara Road at Buffalo Avenue or Susan Road to provide for safer pedestrian crossing.

The construction of a roundabout on this section of Gnangara Road has a number of complications and is not considered a suitable option.

Information on when the Gnangara Road realignment will take place.

No time line is yet available from Main Roads WA to fund and construct the intersection of Whitfords Avenue, Wanneroo Road and the realigned Gnangara Road. As advised at the community information session on 7 December 2015, the City will consider other options to realign Gnangara Road to Windsor Road, subject to the finalisation of land acquisition and traffic modelling.

In regards to Option C, increased traffic noise for residences near the north end of Buffalo Avenue. This option may also attract traffic and hoon drivers from the industrial area north of Gavranich Way.   

These concerns can be addressed to some degree by the inclusion of appropriate traffic treatments installed on the proposed access road.

Suggests signs or speed hump on Marathon Loop near Botev Lane to slow traffic entering from Gnangara Road.

This can be assessed when traffic patterns are re-established following the implementation of the recommended option.

Supports Option C - only option to give a completely separate second access to this precinct. Also offers access to the Wangara Area.   

Noted

Comment

The community consultation clearly indicated that Option C, offering a second vehicle access to the precinct, is favoured by the residents. It offers direct access to the Wangara district and a left-turn onto Wanneroo Road via Gavranich Way and Windsor Road.

 

Option C also includes the left-in at Marathon Loop (west) at Gnangara Road. It is noted that the proposed new access road will not form part of the ultimate realigned Gnangara Road, and would need to be reviewed at that time, however given that it addresses the access issue for the precinct; it is recommended that the City proceeds with this option.

 

Subject to Council’s decision, the design of the preferred option is able to be undertaken by May 2016. The project preliminary work is able to be scheduled during June 2016, with the civil works to commence in July 2016 subject to the allocation of funding in the Long Term Capital Works Budget as detailed in the Financial Implications section of the report.

 

Consideration was also given to determine if the works associated with the left-in access at Marathon Loop (west) can be undertaken ahead of other works in 2015/2016 Financial Year. It is noted that after the preparation of design, which will take around two months to complete, MRWA approval of pavement marking and signage will be required. As the approval process usually takes 4-6 weeks, the earliest this construction can commence is late June 2016. It is therefore proposed, that to allow for contingencies in the timeframe, all works are scheduled for July 2016, with the works for the left-in access at Marathon Loop (west) to be undertaken first, followed by the new access road, north of Buffalo Avenue. The works will take approximately 6 – 10 weeks to complete depending on the weather conditions and the availability of suitable contractors.

 

New street lighting works are also necessary to be undertaken as part of the implementation of Option C and the timeframe noted above are subject to the City receiving timely approvals and delivery of the street lighting works by Western Power.

Statutory Compliance

Nil.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.3    Safe Communities - We feel safe at home and in our local area.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

The City’s Accounting Policy Section 3(g)(c) states:

 

          “Circumstances:

           …the budget allocation for a capital work project is insufficient.

 

          Action:

          In accordance with Section 6.8 of the Local Government Act 1995 by way of a report and recommendation to the Council seeking authorisation of the expenditures and to endorse the necessary budget variation.”

Financial Implications

Subject to detailed design and outcome of investigation of the various services, the estimated costs for the design and construction of the three options are summarised below:

·                Option A - $250,000

·                Option B - $90,000; and

·                Option C - $200,000

It is noted that no funding is currently allocated for works associated with these options in the approved Capital Works Budget for 2015/2016. Similarly, no funding has been listed in the draft Long-term Capital Works Budget for these works.

 

Subject to Council’s decision, to implement Option C, $20,000 will need to be identified and allocated in the 2015/2016 Capital Works Budget to enable the design/documentation, approvals and preliminary works to be undertaken as a priority. Similarly, further funding of $180,000 would need to be considered by Council in the Capital Works Budget as part of the 2016/2017 budget process to undertake the construction works associated with this option.

 

It is proposed to reallocate $20,000 from Project No PR-1087 – Road Resurfacing Program –Various to undertake the design/documentation, approvals and preliminary works for the new project for the Construction of Access Road from Buffalo Avenue to Gavranich Way and Left-(Option C), noting that the Roads Resurfacing Program is being delivered in a number of stages and the roads identified in this year’s program are still able to be resurfaced within the remaining budget.

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       NOTES the results of the community consultation and ENDORSES Option C for design and construction as shown on the concept plan Drawing No. 3128-9-1 (Attachment 4) for the purposes of preparing detailed design as follows:

a)      Left-in only connection of Marathon Loop at its western end with Gnangara Road

b)      Construction of a temporary access road from Buffalo Avenue north to Gavranich Way.

2.       APPROVES, by ABSOLUTE MAJORITY, an unbudgeted expenditure of $20,000, subject to Section 6.8(1)(b) of the Local Government Act 1995 and in accordance  with the City’s Accounting Policy Section 3(8)(a) and APPROVES the following budget amendment:

Description

GL Account/ Capital Project

Current Budget ($)

Adjusted Budget ($)

Road Resurfacing Projects – Various

PR-1087

2,536,384

2,516,384

Construction of Access Road from Buffalo Avenue to Gavranich Way and Left-in

PR-XXXX

-

$20,000

3.       LISTS $180,000 funding for  consideration in the Long Term Capital Works Budget as part of the 2016/2017 budget process for the construction of the access road from Buffalo Avenue to Gavranich Way and left-in access to marathon Loop (west) off Gnangara road; and

 

4.       ADVISES the survey respondents of Council’s decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Marathon Loop   Gnangara Road - Locality Map

15/139271

 

2.

Marathon Loop Gnangara Road - Concept Drawing Option 1 - Number 3128-1-0

16/9343

 

3.

Marathon Loop Gnangara Road - Concept Plan Option 2- Number 3128-6-0

16/8337

 

4.

Marathon Loop Gnangara Road - Concept Drawing Option 3 - Number 3128-9-0

16/15312

Minuted

5.

Marathon Loop and Gnangara Road Accessibility - 2nd Community consultation

16/50088

 

 

   


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          84

Draft

Community & Place

Cultural Development

3.15  Appointment of an artist, Tony Pankiw, for the Pearsall Hocking Community Centre Public Artwork

File Ref:                                              1436 – 16/5317

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community & Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

 

Issue

To consider the appointment of artist, Tony Pankiw, for the Pearsall Hocking Community Centre public artwork (bicycle rack).

 

Background

The Pearsall Hocking Community Centre (PHCC) is to be located on Willespie Drive, Pearsall. The design philosophy underpinning the PHCC is to achieve a development that will become a focal point for the community, encouraging walking or bicycling to and from the Centre, and will create a sense of pride. The Centre will provide for a wide range of community uses from playgroups, meetings, social functions, educational and indoor recreational activities.

 

The treatment to the southern area of the building presents a landscaped aspect which enhances the building and, to a degree, masks the extent of the vehicle parking area and encourages walking and cycling to the locality. Elements include:-

 

·        Wide pathways linking the Pearsall Primary School to the PHCC and the Neighbourhood Shopping Centre. Note that these pathways are skate board friendly in design.

·        The integration into the landscaped design of seating and areas to attract young people to congregate for socialisation.

·        A playground for children which is accessible 24/7 and will provide a valuable resource for primary school aged students.

·        A public artwork (bicycle rack) to be located on the left of the driveway into the carpark and will also act as an entrance statement to the facility.

 

The State Government Percent for Art Scheme (The Scheme) was established in 1989 with two key objectives: to improve the quality of the built environment and value of public facilities; and to create new economic opportunities for Western Australian artists. The Scheme achieves these objectives by using an allocation of a percentage (up to 1 percent) of the estimated total cost of the State’s capital works and major infrastructure projects for public art. In accordance with this State Government legislation, the City of Wanneroo is utilising a percent of the cost of the construction of the PHCC for public artwork.

Detail

An Artist’s Brief was distributed on 30th June to 40 public artists, to the artist organisation Artsource and to the tertiary institutions like ECU, UWA, Curtin and Central TAFE. The Brief proposed that there should be one original public artwork, which would also function as a bicycle rack, perhaps allowing for some cover or shade. This artwork was required to reflect the themes of the proposed building's architectural design, like nature, sociability and sustainability.

 

Artists were requested to provide a cost breakdown, which took into account:

 

·        design work (drawings and maquettes);

·        preliminaries like site preparation and footings;

·        costs for attendance at three meetings;

·        Structural Engineer's Certificate;

·        purchase of the materials;

·        manufacture of the artwork;

·        site delivery and installation; and

·        all other relevant costs required to complete the artwork.

 

The scope of work for the successful artist(s) included:

 

·        Conduct research into the public artwork;

·        Create a design and a maquette for the artwork;

·        Meet with the Reference Group and other stakeholders;

·        Obtain aesthetic and structural engineering approval for the designs;

·        Construct and install the artwork in accordance with the signed contract; and

·        Provide a comprehensive maintenance/conservation plan and schedule.

 

By the closing date of 17 July four artists had tendered Expressions of Interest in the project. These were Rob McCulloch, Tony Pankiw, Leanne Bray and Medhi Rasulle (Sculpture Sitoara).

 

In the trial of a new selection process for public art works, a panel was formed including representatives from Community & Place, Building Maintenance, Assets, Facilities as well as an Elected Member and a Community Representative from the Arts Advisory Committee. Criteria for shortlisting included a measure of high quality, innovative and high artistic merit; connection to the surrounding environment; iconic; and consideration of the materials to be utilised. Shortlisting was undertaken on the Tuesday 18 August. Tony Pankiw, Leanne Bray and Mehdi Rasulle were shortlisted and requested to undertake further concept development, to provide the panel with visuals and a maquette.

 

The panel interviewed these three artists on 29 September and considered their concepts for public artwork for PHCC.  The criteria on this occasion were Design Concept (40%); Methodology (30%); Work Program (20%) and Price (10%). Design Concept includes overall idea, scale, materials, form, how it relates to its surroundings. Methodology includes how the materials are utilised, fabrication, surface treatments, installation, risk, safety and maintenance issues, especially resilience to graffiti.

 

Tony Pankiw’s design scored most highly on all three areas – design, methodology and work program.  The panel agreed that it was a unique concept, which had the “wow” factor with flying bicycles and it fitted the brief to encourage residents to walk or cycle to the Centre.

Consultation

A new public artwork’s selection process was piloted with the Pearsall Hocking Community Centre and will be utilised for future public art commissions. A Public Art Selection Panel was formed comprising the Director Community & Place, the Manager Cultural Development, the Coordinator Cultural Services, Elected Members, community art representatives, Asset’s Project Officer for the project and a Building Maintenance representative. The Selection Panel evaluated the Expressions of Interest received and shortlisted the artists for interview. Interviews addressed the relevant criteria and the Panel evaluated the concept development. The recommendation from the Panel was referred to the Arts Advisory Committee, which has supported the recommendation to be presented to Council for endorsement.

Comment

The commissioning of this unique and aesthetically pleasing sculpture by renowned local artist, Tony Pankiw, represents an exceptional piece of three-dimensional artwork utilised to create a sense of place for the new PHCC. It can be accommodated within the City’s public works budget as a percent for art component. An artwork of this quality will also provide good value for the City, being a significant addition to the Public Art Collection. This piece does not duplicate any artwork already in the Public Art Collection.  

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

Risk Management Considerations

There is no existing strategic or corporate risk within the City’s existing risk registers that relates to the issue contained within this report. Risk would be mitigated by contractual arrangements, supervision and insurance. The Arts Advisory Committee has supported the appointment of the artist Tony Pankiw for the commission of the Pearsall Hocking Community Centre Public Artwork. Arts Advisory Committee Community Representative, William Dennis, whilst raising concerns in regard to height of the proposed structure and the risk of the public climbing on the artwork, shape of the bicycle stand component and graffiti risk. These concerns have been noted and will be referred for consideration to those involved in design finalisation with the artist before the commencement of the commission.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

$30,000 is available for the artwork/bicycle rack for PHCC in the 2015/16 Capital Works Budget (PR 1046). The full cost of the commission will be covered by this allocation including artist fees for design, construction and installation of the public artwork. 

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council APPROVES the commissioning of artist Tony Pankiw for the public artwork (bicycle rack) for the Pearsall Hocking Community Centre.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Concept Development by Tony Pankiw for Pearsall Hocking Community Centre

15/488298

 

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          87

Draft

Community Facilities

3.16  City of Wanneroo Tennis Court Free Use Trial

File Ref:                                              19967 – 16/9406

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community & Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       6  

Previous Items:                                   MN02-11/14 - Trial for free use of Tennis Courts - Ordinary Council - 11 Nov 2014 7:00pm

                                                            CD04-12/14 - Trial for Free Use of Tennis Courts - Ordinary Council - 09 Dec 2014 7:00pm

                                                            CD06-04/15 - Tennis Court Free Use Trial - Ordinary Council - 28 Apr 2015 7.00pm      

 

Issue

To consider the results of the City of Wanneroo tennis court free use trial.

 

Background

The implementation of the trial was initiated as a result of a Motion On Notice which was presented to Council by Cr Winton at the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 11 November 2014 (MN02-11/14). Council’s resolution in respect to this Motion was as follows:

 

“That Council INSTRUCTS Administration to investigate a trial period of free community access to tennis courts at Hudson Park, Girrawheen and Bellport Parade, Mindarie and report back to Council in December 2014.”

 

As a consequence a report was considered by Council at its meeting held on 9 December 2014 (CD04-12/14), where Council resolved as follows:

 

“1.     NOTES that the implementation of a trial period of free community access to the Koondoola Park and Bellport Park tennis courts is considered feasible;

2.       APPROVES the implementation of a formal trial period for Koondoola Park and Bellport Park, commencing from 1 January 2015 for a period of 12 months;

3.       APPROVES by ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the waiver of fees and charges as per the adopted 2014/15 Schedule of Fees and Charges (Attachment 2 refers) for the use of the City's tennis courts at Koondoola Park and Bellport Park for the duration of the trial period;

4.       NOTES that a further report on the outcomes of the first three months of the  trial period will be presented to Council for its consideration at its meeting in April 2015; and

5.       AMENDS Council's earlier resolution, requiring a report on other underutilised courts MN02-11/14 to be presented in March 2015, to allow this report to be presented in April 2015.”

 

A subsequent report was presented to Council at its meeting held on 28 April 2015 (CD06-04/15), where Council resolved the following:

 “1.    APPROVES the extension of the free use tennis court trial, to all City managed tennis courts within the City, with the exception of courts containing established tennis clubs based at: Gumblossom Park, Quinns Rocks; Elliot Road, Wanneroo; and Montrose Park, Girrawheen; and

2.       APPROVES by ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the waiver of fees and charges as per the adopted 2014/15 and proposed 2015/16 Schedule of Fees and Charges for the use of the City's tennis courts as per 1) above, for the extended free use trial of tennis courts.”

 

Detail

In its totality, the trial of free tennis court use included the following courts:

 

Court

Location

Comment

Yanchep (Spinifex Park)

Spinifex Loop, Yanchep

Part of free use trial

Kingsbridge Park

Kingsbridge Bvd, Butler

Part of free use trial

Bellport Park

Ferndale Cnr, Mindarie

Part of free use trial

Banksia Grove (Delamare Park)

Abbey Green Rd, Banksia Grove

Part of free use trial

Hudson Park

Hudson Ave, Girrawheen

Part of free use trial

Koondoola Park

Koondoola Ave, Koondoola

Part of free use trial

 

A plan showing the location of these facilities has been included in (Attachment 1).

 

Review of the Free Use Trial

The review of the free use trial (the Trial) will focus on the following key areas, consistent with those reported to Council in the previous reports tabled in relation to this matter:

 

Management of Existing Bookings

Before the trial, Administration managed various annual and seasonal bookings for tennis courts, where groups reserved courts a set times per week. During the free trial period, these groups were instructed to carry their booking confirmation with them, in case there was a need to request casual players to move on.

 

During the trial there were no reported issues relating to this process. Feedback received during the survey was in relation to competing casual users, furthermore it was reported that all court users were accommodating with each other and there were no issues.

 

Should the free use continue, signage will be installed and information available on the internet with regard to booked facilities, similar to the way it was managed throughout the trial.

 

Security (Vandalism and Maintenance)

Prior to the trial, the main report of vandalism was in relation to the external fences being cut for people to gain access. During the trial, this ceased. There was an isolated report of net and post damage, but it’s only alleged that the damaged was sustained due to the courts being open. From results of the survey, residents noted a reduction in graffiti and other vandalism.

 

For the future, users of the courts will be given information on how to report damage and other issues. Whilst the frequency of court inspections is a function of resource capacity, should there be repeated damaged at specific courts, Administration would implement an inspection regime of these venues on a more regular basis. 

 

Lighting

The lighting controls for courts were adjusted, to allow for push button control. Due to the lighting type (globes), these lights need time to warm up and cool down between being turned off and back on. As such, the timers are set for four hours to avoid repetitive actions. The lights are currently scheduled to turn off at 10pm, regardless of push-button activation.

 

During the survey, some residents complained the lights were on too late and with no-one around. With advancements in LED technology, full light levels can be achieved instantly with the push of a button and no cool-down time required. Therefore the time periods can be reduced, which can reduce the instances where the lights are left on. In addition the time period allowable for lighting these tennis courts can be investigated for each site, as some courts are closer to houses than others and noise amenity needs to be considered as well as light pollution.

 

It should be noted that not all courts have lighting provision.

 

Promotion

During the trial, social media, print media, mail-outs and court signage were all used to communicate the trial to residents. Should the free use continue, the same media will be use to communicate the ongoing use. Costs for such promotion will be met through existing operational budgets.

 

Measurement and Evaluation

 

·        Time Lapse Camera

Initially, Administration sought to undertake data collection via the use of a time lapse camera attached to a pole overlooking the tennis courts, as was done at Bellport Park and Koondoola Reserve. The time lapse camera was installed at the Bellport Park Tennis Courts from 17 February 2015 to 4 March 2015 (16 days). The data gained from the camera showed that the courts were utilised every day, with average visits on weekdays by up to 20 individuals and over the weekend by up to 35 individuals. The highest recorded visit on any day was 42 individuals with 9 on the lowest day. In total, during the data collection period, the venue was used by 405 individuals, however it should be noted that it is not possible to determine the number of repeat visitors. It should also be noted that this usage also includes regular hirers on Tuesday mornings and Friday afternoons.

 

Unfortunately, the camera installed at Koondoola was stolen within days of installation. As a result, it was decided not to continue with the use of the cameras, for reasons of security,  OSH and cost issues in respect to having the cameras rotated between each of the courts. As a consequence Administration decided to pursue further data collection via an on-line survey tool.

 

·        Online Survey

In November 2015, an online survey was developed and released for comment (Attachment 2). Social media, print media and onsite signage was used to promote the survey. In addition, letters were sent to residents adjacent to all tennis courts in the trial, inviting them to participate in the survey.

 

The online survey was made available to the public on 16 November 2015 and closed on 31 January 2016. The timeframe the survey was deliberately set to cover the month of January and the Australian Open.

 

Aside from questions regarding demographic information, the following questions were amongst those asked:

 

·        Did you use the tennis courts before the free trial?

·        Did you use the tennis courts during the free trial?

·        Has your usage of the tennis courts increase because of the free trial?

·        Would you recommend the City continue providing free tennis courts permanently?

·        Have you experienced any availability issues at the courts during the free use trial?

·        Have you any concerns regarding the free tennis court trial?

·        Are there any other facilities that are needed at the courts if the free use continues?

 

Administration received 80 responses to the online survey, of which 95% (76) of respondents lived in the City of Wanneroo. Since the survey was advertised to those using the courts, this would suggest people outside of the City are travelling to the City of Wanneroo to use the facilities.

 

Of the respondents, 50% (40) were male and 50% (40) were female. The range of ages of respondents varied, with the majority being between 21 and 49. The table below details the age profile of respondents.

 

Age range

Number

17 or younger

3

18-20

2

21-29

14

30-39

19

40-49

28

50-59

5

60 or older

9

 

The breakdown of facility usage by respondents has been provided in the table below, with Bellport Tennis Courts having the highest number of responses with 33%, followed by Kingsbridge Tennis Courts with 15% and Koondoola Tennis Courts with 13%.

 

Venue

Number of responses

 

Bellport Tennis Courts

28 (33% )

Delamare Tennis Courts

8 (9%)

Hudson Park Tennis Courts

5 (6%)

Kingsbridge Tennis Courts

15 (17%)

Koondoola Park Tennis Courts

13 (15%)

Montrose Tennis Courts

1 (1%)

Spinifex Tennis Courts

1 (1%)

General Comments for all courts.

15 (17%)

*Note - some respondents commented on multiple venues

 

From the survey data provided (allowing for missed questions by respondents) it was determined that:

·        30% of respondents used the courts before the trial (23 of 79)

·        91% of respondents used the courts during the trial (71 of 78)

·        88.5% stated an increase in usage because of free use (69 of 78)

·        80% supported the continuation of free use (64 of 80)

·        11.4% of respondents experienced availability issues at the courts (9 of 79)

·        15% had some concerns about free use (12 of 79)

·        5% responded that other facilities should be provided at the courts (4 of 79)

 

Notable comments received on whether the City should continue providing free use include:

·        “Yes, my house looks down at the courts and since the trial began I have seen a lot of people enjoying the courts, before the free trial they were used very little.”

·        “So fantastic, every time we have gone the courts to play there have also been other groups there. Everyone is willing to share and the courts are well utilised. The Koondoola courts are in excellent condition and appear to have been respected by those using them. Being able to go over and play a free game of tennis has been fantastic for our family and we hope this continues to be the case.”

(A full list of responses to the above question can be viewed at (Attachment 3). )

 

Notable comments received regarding concerns of the free use include:

·                “Yes - the general court quality at all COW courts is very low, maintenance is required”

·                “Vandalism and theft”

 

(A full list of responses to the above question can be viewed at (Attachment 4).)

 

A full list of responses relating to the question regarding extra amenities can be viewed at (Attachment 5), however comments centred around shelter, water points and toilet facilities.

 

Notable additional comments about the trial include:

·        “My family use to go out every weekend to play tennis at a local tennis court. That was until it got demolished and replaced with townhouses. We loved playing tennis, because it was an opportunity to get some exercise and have fun with our family. We were not prepared to pay money to go and have our weekly game. With this free trial, we have started playing tennis again.”

·        “An excellent initiative, an indirect benefit has been a marked reduction in anti-social behaviour around the courts. Previously there was gathering of youths and graffiti on the wall which had drastically reduced as lights are on and more people are using the courts. Great to see families having fun together and engaging in healthy activity.”

·        “Please continue the free tennis court it provides a wonderful community spirit. Sometimes we have to wait to use but at times we ended up joining in with strangers in a doubles match. Otherwise worth the wait.”

 

A full list of responses can be viewed at (Attachment 6).

 

It should be noted that if continuation of free use tennis courts is endorsed, Administration will develop a management plan for these facilities, which will include permanent site signage and appropriate advertising. Furthermore, Administration will continue to monitor and record instances of complaints or damage associated with each venue.

 

Anecdotal Evidence

In addition to the survey responses and data collected from the time-lapse camera, there has been a degree of anecdotal evidence captured from officers in respect to increased level of use of the subject tennis courts during the trial period - one example being officers who undertook a recent on-site community consultation meeting at Hudson Park, noticing up to eight young people using the courts for tennis activities.

Consultation

During the trial, all local tennis clubs, registered annual and seasonal hirers were informed about the trial. In addition, internal maintenance staff were requested to notify Community Facilities staff of any irregular maintenance required that could be attributed to the free use period. In addition, the free use trial was undertaken during the roll out of the Healthy Communities Your-Move project and some responses were received through their community consultation.

Comment

Overall, Administration considers the evidence resulting from the implementation of the trial is supportive of its success, in that not only did the trial result in increased patronage and use of the courts, it also encouraged social connections. As a result, this report recommends the continuation of free use at non-club based facilities, with the existing booking process (as outlined within this report) to remain in place.

 

Consideration will also need to be given to the management of Club facilities at the following locations:

·        Gumblossom Park, Quinns Rocks;

·        Elliot Road, Wanneroo; and

·        Montrose Park, Girrawheen.

 

In continuing the Free Community Access model, this report will recommend that these three courts be excluded and use be managed as per the City’s current booking process and Facility Hire and Use Policy. In this respect, clubs and user groups would be required to book the facility on either an annual, seasonal or casual basis (as is currently the case) and to pay the relevant fee (noting the City’s subsidised use policy provisions).

 

The rationale for excluding these facilities from the continuation of the Free Community Access model is based on:

 

·        The need for the City to actively manage these facilities given the level of use by Clubs;

·        The need to maintain these facilities to a higher standard based on club usage and respective competition requirements; and

·        The need to ensure the ongoing security of the courts and supporting amenities.

 

If these facilities were included in the continued Free Community Access model, it would be difficult for Administration to ensure priority of access for clubs and the ongoing maintenance of the facilities to the required standard.

 

This report will also seek approval from Council to continue to waive fees for the community use courts, until such time as the Schedule of Fees and Charges for the 2016/17 budget are adopted, which will make provision for free community use on an ongoing basis.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.2    Healthy and Active People - We get active in our local area and we have many opportunities to experience a healthy lifestyle.

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

The Facility Hire and Use Policy is the main policy which governs the management of use of the City's facilities and reserves. In this respect, the trial aligns with the fair play provisions within the policy in relation to:

 

"The City strives for improved fairness and equity in facility and service delivery with the goal of maximising community use. It encourages positive user attitudes and assists in the regulation of facility use."

 

However, the trial is contrary to the policy as it relates to management of use on that basis that:

 

"The use of a facility on either a casual or annual basis without expressed permission of the City is forbidden and will result in future requests for the hire of City facilities being refused."

 

In respect to the City's Schedule of Fees and Charges, the trial is contrary to the requirement for Administration to, at all times, apply the relevant fee as outlined within the adopted schedule.

 

It should be noted that the current review underway of the City’s Facility Hire and Use Policy presents an opportunity to address this conflict into the future.

Financial Implications

The financial implications of adopting the Free Community Use model for the identified tennis courts is considered by Administration to be minimal, on the basis that the historical level of use of the courts involved in the trial has been low.

 

The trial has shown that there has been no real increase in costs associated with tennis court maintenance and therefore can be sufficiently managed within existing operating budgets.

 

Anecdotally, it can be said that the benefit of free access to tennis courts outweighs the cost of tennis court provision.

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       APPROVES the adoption of a Tennis Court Free Use Model for all City of Wanneroo tennis courts, with the exception of the tennis court facilities at Gumblossom Park in Quinns Rocks, Elliot Road in Wanneroo and Montrose Park in Girrawheen;

2.       APPROVES by ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the ongoing waiver of fees and charges as per the adopted 2015/16 Schedule of Fees and Charges for the use of the City's tennis courts, with the exception of club courts located at Gumblossom Park in Quinns Rocks, Elliot Road in Wanneroo and Montrose Park in Girrawheen; and

3.       NOTES that the free use of tennis courts be reflected in the 2016/17 Schedule of Fees and Charges for those non-club based courts, whilst still retaining current fees and charges associated with club based courts.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Tennis Courts Map

16/31727

 

2.

Online Free Use Tennis Survey

16/36969

 

3.

Summary Question 8 of Free Tennis Survey

16/28595

 

4.

Summary Question 10 of Free Tennis Survey

16/28599

 

5.

Summary Question 11 of Free Tennis Survey

16/28600

 

6.

Summary Question 12 of Free Tennis Survey

16/28602

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                          94

Draft

3.17  Passive Park Upgrade - Development of Stage 1 and 2 - Salitage Park, Pearsall

File Ref:                                              22722 – 16/23829

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community & Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4  

Previous Items:                                   CD02-11/15 - Passive Park Upgrade - Salitage Park Concept Plan - Ordinary Council - 10 Nov 2015 7.00pm      

 

Issue

To consider the proposed concept plan for the development of Salitage Park, Pearsall

 

Background

Salitage Park (the Park) is located at 5 Salitage Link, Pearsall and is an existing passive park of approximately 0.8 hectares in size. The Park is classified as a Local Park as per the City’s Public Open Space Hierarchy.

 

Other existing public open space within the walkable catchment of the Park (400m to 800m, 5 minute to 10 minute walk) includes:

 

Park

Location

Status

Size

Ashbrook Park

42 Ashbrook Avenue, Pearsall

Undeveloped

460m

Covent Park

10 Busch Parkway, Pearsall

Developed with play equipment /Sand Softfall

500m

Voyager Park

2 Voyager Link, Pearsall

Undeveloped

630m

At its meeting held on 10 November 2015, Council considered report CD02-11/15 and resolved as follows:

“That Council:-

 

1.       ENDORSES the Salitage Park concept plan as shown in Attachment 1 of this report;

 

2.       NOTES that Administration will investigate options for an increased water allocation for Salitage Park;

 

3.       NOTES that should Administration be able to secure an additional water allocation for Salitage Park, that the concept plan as per Attachment 1 will be reviewed to maximise the irrigated turfed area in the southern section of the Park;

 

4.       NOTES that any changes to the provision of the existing proposed elements identified within the concept plan (as per Attachment 1) to address the budget implications resulting from the additional turfed area will be the subject of further consultation with Residents, the Mayor and Ward Councillors prior to finalisation of the revised concept plan;

 

5.       NOTES that Administration will develop a Stage 2 concept addressing the development of the northern and north eastern section of the Park, which will be listed for consideration in the City’s 20 Year Capital Works Budget;

 

6.       NOTES that based on the current proposed project schedule, construction of the proposed development is due to commence in April 2016 and will be concluded in June 2016; and

 

7.       RECOGNISES and THANKS the community for its involvement in the community consultation component of the project.”

 

The initial draft concept plan (as endorsed by Council at its meeting held on 10 November 2015) has been included as (Attachment 1) to this report. This plan provides for the following elements:

Element

Description

Pathways

Connecting pathway linking elements and access to the park 

Play equipment x 5

Play equipment to suit young children (3 pieces) and teenagers (2 pieces), catering for all ages groups (indicative pieces);

Picnic Table & Seating x 2

Standard City of Wanneroo picnic table;

Bench Seating x 2

Standard City of Wanneroo bench seating;

Advanced Trees

Approx. 84 new trees – various species

Sand softfall

Sand under play equipment as this is considered the most suitable for this type of play equipment.

Solar Lighting

Standard City of Wanneroo specification;

Turf Area

To provide a kick-about space for play and other outdoor activities

 

The design philosophy supporting the initial draft concept for the Park has been to focus on the development of a space that promotes a healthy, outdoor activity space for young children and youth.

 

A number of seating areas have been included to encourage intergenerational interaction and supervision of activities, in particular those involving young children. Safety is provided by developing the central area only, which is open to view from the neighbourhood, and also by an enclosing path to the integrated play area. The concept has been developed within the existing clear area and the addition of trees and planting will enhance this space.

 

The draft concept plan incorporates water-wise design principles by using additional native tree planting, while also maintaining an area of dry land. The design of the park has taken into consideration existing parks within the surrounding area, noting the availability of both active and passive pursuits, irrigated and unirrigated parks within the immediate area.

 

Detail

As a result of Council’s resolutions from report CD02-11/15, a revised draft concept plan was developed (Attachment 2). The key differences between this concept and the previous concept endorsed by Council (Attachment 1) were as follows:

 

Element

Description

Turfing

Increased to maximise the turf allocation to the edge of the park.

Pathways

Small changes including the removal of coloured concrete and reconfigured pathway

Mulch and Tree Planting

Trees were moved to stage 1 only and increased in number to 100. Mulch was incorporated to the north boundary so that turf could be concentrated in activity areas

Play Equipment

2 pieces of equipment was substituted to a less expensive type to accommodate extra turfing and associated works. Number of play pieces remained the same.

 

The issue in respect to water availability was further investigated by Administration, which found that the Department of Water and the City of Wanneroo’s requirements state that the size of the irrigated area for local parks is not to exceed 33% of the total park footprint.

 

The initial draft concept (Attachment 1) based this calculation on the southern section of the park only. Subsequent to this, advice was received that it is appropriate to revise this calculation to include the northern and north eastern sections, in addition to the southern section. This enabled Administration to increase the size of the turfed area for the southern section, with a small allowance for additional turfing on the northern section, as a later stage (stage 2). This however, was based on the north eastern section being developed as a bushland/nature play area with no turf.

 

Administration undertook further consultation with residents, the Mayor and Ward Councillors, in respect to the revised concept plan (Attachment 2), via an on-site meeting held on 21 December 2015.

 

As a result of this consultation process, residents were of a firm view that further review of the concept was required, based on the following key areas of concern:

 

Element

Description

Turfing

Maximising the available turfed area to facilitate informal sporting and recreational games, i.e a “kick-about” space.

Planting

Consolidate planting and garden bed areas into one location to facilitate additional turf provision.

Pathways

Re-orientate pathways to provide larger areas of turf.

Mulch and Tree Planting

Consolidate these within the planting areas.

Play Equipment

The playground footprint has been reconfigured and equipment has been substituted but still has the same play value targeting the same age group.

Stage 2 Development

Development of the northern section as a part of the current project. Residents were concerned that if this section was left as a future stage 2 it wouldn’t be developed in a timely manner.

 

Subsequently, Administration developed a final concept plan (Attachment 3), which includes the following changes:

 

Element

Description

Southern Section

 

Turfing

Maximising the turfed area through the following:

·    Consolidation of planting areas to the south west corner of the park;

·    Re-alignment of the paths to the north east and western edge.

Playground 

The central playground area has been re-configured, with a slight change in the playground equipment (as noted on the concept plans) based on cost, but with no change in target age groups. The existing levels on site have prevented this area from being moved too far from it original location.

 

Northern Section

 

Fitness Equipment

Fitness equipment (x5) has been included on the western edge of this section to take advantage of the existing path and the additional trees to be provided;

Turfing

Additional turfing has been provided (within the limitations of existing guidelines);

Landscaping

Mulching and additional trees to the eastern edge of this section, with the provision of a picnic table and bench seat;

Maintenance Vehicle Entry

Provision of a crushed limestone park at the northern end to facilitate maintenance vehicle entry.

 

The final draft concept plan has been able to maintain the turf areas within the 33% requirement. As outlined within the Financial Implications section of this report, the development of the southern section can be undertaken within the available budget, however the development of the northern section will require an additional funding allocation of $90,000.

Consultation

The initial community consultation period was conducted between 30 September and 28 October 2015 and included the following consultation strategy, as endorsed by the City’s Community Engagement Advisor: 

 

·        Distribution of an information letter to residents within a 400m radius of the Park, requesting that they take part in an online survey and view the concept plan.

·        Providing residents an opportunity to contact City officers to request direct mailing of plans and surveys

·        On site community consultation held on 14 October 2015 to allow interested members of the public to view and discuss the draft concept plan with the relevant City of Wanneroo staff members and Elected members and;

·        Inclusion of the concept plan and comment form on the City's web site under the 'Your Say" section. 

 

The initial draft concept plan (Attachment 1) was used as the basis of the consultation process and as reported to Council at its meeting held on 10 November 2015 (report CD02-11/15).

 

As outlined within this report, Administration received 43 submissions in total (out of 805 mails outs), with forty (40) responses supporting the proposed concept plan and three (3) not supporting the development of the Park. 

 

Of the three respondents who didn’t support the plan, one felt that there were enough parks for young children and not enough parks for teenagers.  The second respondent did not want the park to be a playground for teenagers.  The third respondent felt that the money could be better spent elsewhere.

 

For the respondents who were in favour of the proposed concept, many comments focused on irrigated areas and providing justification for the installation of play equipment. A summary of the top 6 response categories is provided below, with an additional summary included in (Attachment 4).

 

Top 6 Response Categories:

 

·        Provide more green space and apply to increase the water allocation (16);

·        Park maintenance, (weed and prickle free), concerns of fruit fly (12);

·        More benches with shelters (9);

·        Installation of a BBQ (9);

·        Shade sails (8); and

·        Dog litter bags Dog friendly (5).

 

As outlined earlier within this report, Administration undertook a further on-site consultation process with residents, the Mayor and Ward Councillors on 21 December 2015. This consultation was based on the revised draft concept plan included as (Attachment 2).

 

The revised concept plan (Attachment 3), has been developed as a direct result of the feedback received from residents from the consultation undertaken in December 2015.

Comment

In concluding the consultation phase of the Salitage Park concept plan, Administration confirms the amenities to be installed at the Park in the southern section include the following:

·        Connecting pathways

·        Play equipment x 5 pieces

·        Picnic Table & Seating x 2

·        Bench seating x 2

·        Advanced trees – approx.125

·        Turf area

 

Additionally, the amenities to be included within the northern section (subject to additional budget approval) include the following:

·        Fitness equipment x 5

·        Additional turfing

·        Limestone path

·        Additional bench seating

·        Additional Picnic table/seating

 

In respect to project timeframes, there has been a change in the project schedule due to the extended consultation and concept development process. As a result, the original construction period of April to June 2016, has been revised to June to October 2016 (inclusive of the northern section). The tender will be developed with two separable portions for the works associated with the southern and northern sections, given Council is yet to consider the additional budget as part of its long term Capital Works Program draft budget process.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.2    Healthy and Active People - We get active in our local area and we have many opportunities to experience a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

Risk Management Considerations

There is no envisaged enterprise risks associated with the implementation of the project. Project risks will be identified and managed using the City’s Project Management Framework.

Policy Implications

The City's Local Planning Policy 4.3 Public Open Spaces was used as the guiding framework for the development of the draft concept plan.

Financial Implications

An allocation of $219,758 is listed in the 2015/16 Capital Works Budget under PR-2573 for the development of Salitage Park. Remaining funding available within the project budget is $186,895, taking into account works already undertaken. The estimated cost for the completion of the southern section of the park is in the order of $185,777 inclusive of contingencies, design and project management fees and inflation.

 

The cost to develop the northern section has been estimated at $90,000. Given that the project schedule has changed, with the development of the southern section not expected to be completed until October 2016, this report will recommend that the funds for the development of the northern section be included for consideration in the long term Capital Works Program draft budget.  Once the tender process in completed and cash flow in accordance with the revised project delivery timeline is clearer, it will also be necessary to incorporate this in the long term Capital Works Program draft budget for consideration due to the project now continuing into 2016/17.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.       ENDORSES the Salitage Park concept plan as shown in Attachment 3 of this report inclusive of the development of the northern section of Salitage Park;

 

2.       LISTS the sum of $90,000 for consideration in the long term draft Capital Works Budget for the completion of the additional northern section of Salitage Park, as shown in Attachment 3;

 

3.       NOTES that based on the current schedule, construction of the proposed development is due to commence in June 2016 and will be concluded in October  2016 (inclusive of the northern section of Salitage Park subject to budget outcome); and

 

4.       RECOGNISES and THANKS the community for its involvement in the community consultation component of the project.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Salitage Park - Initial Concept Design

15/452532

 

2.

Salitage Park  - Revision Concept Design

16/27983

 

3.

Salitage Park  - Final Concept Design

16/27937

Minuted

4.

Salitage Park – Concept Plan - Consultation Results

15/508590

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        100

Draft

3.18  Yanchep Active Open Space Sports Amenities Building

File Ref:                                              6443 – 16/32901

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community & Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4  

Previous Items:                                   CD02-08/14 - Yanchep Active Open Space - Sports Amenities Building Extension - Ordinary Council - 19 Aug 2014 7:00pm      

 

Issue

To consider an increase in the size of the proposed multi-purpose space in the Yanchep Active Open Space Sports Amenities Building (the Building).

 

Background

In February 2012, Administration met with local sporting clubs to review the draft concept for the development of Yanchep Active Open Space (YAOS). The YAOS is a district level facility, comprising two multipurpose, senior-sized playing fields. These playing fields will be able to cater for both senior and junior sporting competitions (including, though not exclusive to cricket, soccer, rugby, athletics and AFL). Additionally, YAOS will also provide two multipurpose hardcourts, floodlighting to the playing fields (up to 50 Lux - “large-ball sport training level”), car parking, playground and the Building.

 

Detail

A preliminary concept plan for the Building was developed (Attachment 1)

 

Following the decision of Council in respect to the provision of a 100m2 multi-purpose room to the existing Oldham Reserve Changerooms (CD02-08/14), as part of standard facility provision, the concept for the Building was further revised (Attachment 2).

 

After consultation with Yanchep Little Athletics Club, Yanchep Junior Football Club, Yanchep Redhawks Cricket Club and Yanchep Redhawks Football Club (the Clubs), the concept has been further adjusted to better suit the operational needs of the clubs, while still maintaining a building standard appropriate to the district level YAOS.

Consultation

Initial design and consultation

A meeting was held with the Clubs at Yanchep Community Centre on Thursday, 5 November. The Meeting was attended by representatives of the Clubs (with the exception of Yanchep Redhawks Cricket Club (YRCC)), representatives from Yanchep United Football Club (Soccer) and Mr John Quigley, MLA for Butler (invited by the Clubs without the knowledge of Administration).

 

A subsequent meeting was held with YRCC on Thursday, 12 November.

 

A number of points were raised by the Clubs in respect to the design to improve the functionality of the design. These are outlined in detail in (Attachment 3) and touched on the following areas:

 

·        First Aid Room;

·        Roof height on Western side;

·        Function Room;

·        Kiosk;

·        Changerooms;

·        Storage; and

·        Verandah Area.

Comment

While the majority of the design changes identified by the Clubs were considered to be feasible and within budget, the following were considered to be in excess of needs for a district level facility:

 

·        Larger function room; and

·        Larger changeroom.

 

Larger Function Room

While it can be appreciated that YRFC will experience growth in the near future, a 200m2 function room is considered excessive to service a two oval, district level facility. This level of provision would be considered appropriate for a regional facility. It should also be noted that this level of provision is consistent with the larger of the City’s Communities Centres (e.g Butler Community Centre).

 

Administration consulted with surrounding local governments, requesting details regarding their guidelines (or similar) for facility provision at their various sized reserves:

 

·        City of Joondalup – “Function room of minimum 150m2

·        City of Stirling – “Purpose built – room size and number based on need and facility function”

·        City of Swan – no guidelines or policy, though they are being developed

 

Additionally, according to guidelines stipulated by the West Australian Football Commission (WAFC), the floor area for a Senior Club is to be a minimum 100m2.

 

As such, following the guidelines of surrounding Local Governments, and the guidelines of the WAFC, this report will recommend that the multi-purpose room space be designed to a total footprint of 150m2. Administration is of the view that the provision of a total of 150m2 of multipurpose room space is suitable for a district level facility of this type and will accommodate the large majority of the Club’s needs. This position is currently consistent with the draft standards which are currently being developed by Administration in respect to community level sport infrastructure provision.

 

There is currently a 100m2 multipurpose room provided for community use at Oldham Park. This recently established facility was deemed appropriate for a neighbourhood (one oval) facility. As the YAOS is considered a district level open space, it is reasonable to consider that a multipurpose room of 100m2 may be insufficient for the foreseeable use by the community. As such, it is therefore appropriate that the space should be increased from that provided at Oldham Park. Increasing the size of multipurpose room space to 150m2 is considered sufficient to meet the forecast needs.

 

Following from the above, request was passed to the Architect, and subsequently an option (Attachment 4) that caters for 150m2 total (120m2 for the function room, plus an additional 30m2 for a meeting room) was developed. The two rooms are divided by a concertina door, which can be moved to make a bigger space.

 

Approval of a larger function/multipurpose space by an additional 50m2 will not result in significant delay to project delivery timelines as this is only a minor change overall due to other revisions to the design, thus only requiring a total increase to the building footprint of 10-15m2.

 

Larger Changeroom

The request from the football club was to incorporate a removable wall in between two changerooms, thus creating one large changeroom. This would create a space of approximately 90m2. The Club’s rationale is that they have 80 people in the room at any one time.

 

According to the WAFC guidelines, the minimum requirements for a Senior Club are two Changerooms measuring 25m2 each. Currently, the design caters for six changerooms, each measuring 45m2. The football clubs request would mean the changeroom would be approximately four times the minimum requirement from the WAFC.

 

It is not recommended this be incorporated into the design.

 

All other elements from the community consultation have been taken into account with the updated design.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Consideration of the amenities provided as community infrastructure to support community needs has implications in this case relevant to the Yanchep two Rocks Development Contribution Plan. Additionally, planning for new community infrastructure, in particular in the northern growth corridor, has necessitated a review of the City’s standards for community facility provision, which is currently underway to guide future planning provision.

Financial Implications

The City is in the process of determining the exact financial implications of the proposed final design. It is however anticipated that there will be minimal increase to current estimated budget cost due to the proposed minimal increase to the overall building footprint. Any change to the budget requirement will be reflected in the long term Capital Works Program.

 

Currently, the footprint of the building is 275m2 (plus 450m2 for the changeroom building). In order to accommodate the increase in the multi-purpose room total to 150m2, the footprint of the building will only increase by approximately 10m2 – 15m2 due to the revisions agreed through the consultation process.

 

However, if the multi-purpose room were to increase to a total of 200m2, the overall footprint of the building would need to increase by about 90m2. This would represent a large increase in the scope of the project, and would ultimately increase the budget and extend the timeframe for completion.

 

Yanchep Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan (YTRDCP)

 

The YAOS, inclusive of the Building, is included as a shared infrastructure item in the YTRDCP.  Therefore, a relevant consideration of the proposed increase in scope and budget of the Building is its impact on the cost contribution under the YTRDCP.  The cost estimate for the Building component of the YAOS included in the YTRDCP was based on the preliminary concept plan for the building (refer Attachment 1) plus an allowance for a 100 m2 multi-purpose room.  Any change to this scope that results in an increase in cost will likely have a direct impact on the YTRDCP cost contribution. 

 

Notwithstanding the above, the DCP cost estimates were based on concept plans which were always subject to review and amendment through the process of detailed design.  Although some contingencies were built into the estimates for this purpose, a natural part of the DCP operation involves revising the cost estimates as more detailed planning and design is undertaken for DCP facilities.  Any changes to the cost estimates for this facility will need to be factored into the annual review process for the YTRDCP to ensure that the cost estimates reflect the cost of delivering the facilities as best as possible.  Landowners within the DCP area will also need to be updated and consulted through the Yanchep Two Rocks DCP Technical Advisory Committee as part of this review process.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       DOES NOT SUPPORT the request from Yanchep Red Hawks Football Club for  design changes to include:

a)      90m2 changeroom area on the basis that it is not consistent with Western Australian Football Commission standards and will significantly impact on the functionality of the changerooms for other users of the playing fields;

b)      200m2 multipurpose space on the basis that this is an overprovision for a district level facility;

2.       APPROVES the increase from 100m2 to 150m2 of the multi-purpose room within the Yanchep Active Open Space Sports Amenities Building;

3.       NOTES that any change in project costs resulting from the final design will be reflected in the annual review of the Developer Contribution Plan; and

4.       THANKS the Clubs for their input during the consultation phase.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

YAOS Draft Concept Plan Building

14/211078

 

2.

Concept Design - Yanchep Sports Amenities Building - Plan Option 1

15/529230

 

3.

Briefing Note - Club Requests for buildings - based on meeting 5 November 2015

15/590186

 

4.

Concept Plan - Yanchep Active Open Space Sports Amentities Building

15/590138

 

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        104

Draft

3.19  Project Status and Update - Project Number PR-2477 Coastal Risk Assessments

File Ref:                                              20774 – 16/61929

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community & Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil       

 

Issue

To receive an update on the project status and budget for Project Number PR-2477 Coastal Risk Assessments.

 

Background

Council considered a report at its meeting on 2 February 2016, Item CP01-01/16 on Tender No. 01554 Supply, Install and Maintenance of CCTV and Emergency Beacon for Clayton's Beach and resolved as following:

 

“That Council:-

1.       DECLINE the tender submission from Downer EDI in response to Tender No. 01554 for the supply, installation and maintenance of CCTV and emergency beacon for Clayton’s Beach on the basis that:

          a)      The City is unable to provide an adequate determination of value for money; and

            b)    Advice from Surf Life Saving WA that they are not able to adequately resource a 24/7, 365 day a year response to the proposed emergency beacon, thereby posing an unacceptable risk to the City of Wanneroo, should the project go ahead.

2.       AUTHORISE the Director Community and Place to advise the tenderer of the outcome; and

3.       REQUESTS Administration to review the project status and update the budget to be presented to Council at the March meeting.”

 

This report provides the details sought by Council as per Item 3 above.

 

Detail

In 2014, the City engaged Surf Life Saving Western Australia to undertake risk assessments to ensure that the City has identified and reduced the risks to beach users in the City Boundaries. As a result of the risk assessments, risk treatment options were also proposed for consideration and implementation by the City.

 

The risk assessments and treatment options were analysed by the City and a program for the implementation was developed. The recommendations including overall cost estimates were categorised in to the following broad categories:

 

·     Landscaping Risk Treatments including ongoing maintenance ($200,000);

·     Safety Signage ($26,000);

·     Emergency Action Plan;

·     Education and Awareness Programs (70,000); and

·     QR Codes CCTV/Mobile Beacons ($125,000).

 

The overall cost to implement the recommendations was estimated to be in the order of $465,000 inclusive of the costs associated with a dedicated officer to manage this project.

 

It is noted that some of these recommendations, in particular relating to the installation of the safety signage and access tracks hazard identification were implemented in 2014/15 and a further program for implementation of the other recommendations in 2015/16 financial year was prepared.

 

$23,536 was expended in 2014/15 under Project Number PR-2477 and the remaining funds were carried forward into 2015/16 to implement the recommendations, noting that an additional funding of $75,000 was also allocated making a total funding of $464,464 available in 2015/16 for this project. In this financial year, the current expenditure under this project is $37,721.

 

It is noted that it was estimated that $200,000 would be expended on the works identified as landscaping risk treatments. This estimate was significantly higher than the actual need and some of the works associated with this treatment form part of the ongoing monitoring and maintenance works allocated to other budgets. At this stage it is expected that a further $10,000 would be expended to block off and restrict access to tracks.

 

Following a recent Council decision (Item CP01-01/16) to not accept tender for the supply, installation and maintenance of CCTV and emergency beacon for Clayton’s Beach, $125,000 allocated for this purpose remains unexpended. The project to install a CCTV/emergency beacon unit at Clayton’s Beach will not progress at this stage. Administration will monitor the trial underway in NSW and continue to liaise with SLSWA prior to recommending an alternative approach at the location that will prove to be functional and effective.

 

The City has applied for grant funding under the “State CCTV Strategy Infrastructure Fund” for CCTV installations at 3 major coastal node locations to monitor these public realms. 

The areas identified are:

 

·    Clayton’s Beach Mindarie;

·    Quinns Beach; and

·    Yanchep Lagoon.

 

The grant funding application requested a total of $96,000 and the outcome of the grant application is anticipated by the end of March or early April 2016. If successful this will be a saving in the budget, otherwise this amount will be required to undertake these works.

 

Work on QR codes is anticipated to be completed this financial year and will require approximately $10,000 of the allocated project budget.

 

SLSWA has implemented beach safety programs with the support of the City, including specific multicultural youth programs, that have only required in-kind and minor expenditure funded through other areas. Therefore the $70,000 allocated to implement the Education and Awareness Programs remains unexpended.

 

Overall, significant funds remain unallocated and will be surplus to the requirement. It is anticipated that a further $116,000 will be expended on items outlined above, including the CCTV installations should the grant application be unsuccessful.

Consultation

Surf Life Saving WA was consulted in developing the recommendations as a result of the risk assessments and has continued to be consulted on relevant projects, including beach safety education and the emergency beacon..

Comment

Since the development of the coastal risk assessment report in 2014, the implementation phase has seen specific projects planned or delivered in addition to some of the recommendations being incorporated into existing service unit annual workplans. Examples of this include items such as the landscaping or the beach safety awareness and education programs. This has resulted in a reduced requirement for separate budget allocation for delivery of the items outlined through the coastal risk assessment process.

 

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Project Number PR-2477 has an allocation of $446,464 in the approved 2016/17 Capital Works Budget. Based on the current and expected expenditures, it is expected that $300,000 will remain unexpended in this project and is surplus to the requirement. 

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       RECEIVES the update on the project expenditures for Project Number PR-2477 Coastal Risk Assessments; and

2.       NOTES that $300,000 is surplus to the requirements and will remain unexpended in Project Number PR-2477 Coastal Risk Assessments.

 

 

Attachments: Nil


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        107

Draft

3.20  Deed of Agreement - Maintenance of Turf Cricket Wickets at Kingsway Regional Sporting Complex

File Ref:                                              1569 – 15/576463

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community & Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

 

Issue

To consider a new Deed of Agreement between the City and the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club (the Club) for the ongoing maintenance of the turf wickets at the Kingsway Regional Sporting Complex.

 

 

Background

In August 2004, Council considered report (TS14-08/04) regarding a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club for the maintenance of the turf match and practice wickets at the Kingsway Regional Sporting Complex. As a result, Council resolved the following:

 

1)      DECLINES TO ACCEPT any tenders for Tender No 04384 - the Preparation and Maintenance of Kingsway Turf Cricket Wickets.

2)      ENDORSES the principle that the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club is responsible for the management, maintenance and preparation (to the required standard) of the turf centre wickets and practice wickets at the Kingsway Regional Sporting Complex, subject to the City:

a)      contributing to the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club $49,000 per annum paid in two installments of $24,500 each in September and February respectively and is subject to a CPI adjustment annually

b)      supplying and maintaining the following equipment, for the use of the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club:

          i)        Mentay roller (Plant No 98065)

          ii)       Hand roller (Plant No 98118)

3)      AUTHORISES the CEO to prepare a Memorandum of Understanding, with the term of five years, between the City and Wanneroo District Cricket Club to clarify the roles and responsibilities of each party associated with the approval in 2. above.

4)      AMENDS the Fees and Charges Schedule by the inclusion of the following item under the heading Parks, Gardens and Reserves:

a)  Turf Wickets Per Season Per Wicket $1,820 and that the amendment be advertised in accordance with the provisions of Section 6.19 of the Local Government Act 1995.

 

An aerial plan showing the facilities covered by the MOU has been included in (Attachment 1).

 

The MOU was extended for a further five (5) years in 2010 (Attachment 2).

 

By way of summary, the key responsibilities of the City of Wanneroo and the Club as outlined within the 2010 MOU are as follows:

 

Key responsibility for the City of Wanneroo:

 

·        Supply and maintain a suitable roller(s);

·        Collect and deliver plant for maintenance and changeover;

·        Conduct regular plant inspections; and

·        Provide suitable storage for equipment and materials.

 

Key responsibilities for the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club:

·        Mark the wickets;

·        Vacuum the wickets;

·        Toll the wickets ;

·        Mow the wickets;

·        Covers the wickets during inclement weather;

·        Supply and install all necessary chemicals to control pest, weed or fungus;

·        Fertilise and apply organise material to improve health;

·        Adhere to City’s Weed Management Policy; and

·        Grant access to City staff for inspection purposes.

Detail

A review of the existing MOU was undertaken by Administration and the Club in July 2015. Key areas of focus within the review included the review of the machinery provided, the City of Wanneroo’s contribution to the Club for the maintenance of the turf wickets and review of the respective responsibilities between the City and the Club.

 

As a part of the review process, it was recognised that the format and content of the existing MOU needed to be updated to make it consistent with the existing corporate standard. Key components for a revised Deed of Agreement will be as follows:

 

Item

Description

Term of MOU

5 Years

Commencement Date

1 September 2015

Roller provision

Changeover of the previous Mentay Roller to a Hamm HD10 VV roller (occurred in 2012), continues to be fit for purpose.

 

Commencing in August 2011, the WDCC were involved with the review of various machines required to roll and prepare turf cricket wickets. This occurred as a part of the City’s Operator Report process and Fleet Replacement Program.

Contribution Fees

Annual payment of $82,000 (+gst), paid in two instalments. September and February each financial year. Increased by Perth CPI each year commencing in 2015/16.

 

Prior to the expiration of the current MOU (Attachment 2), the WDCC undertook to test the market through their own tender process, for the continual maintenance of the turf wickets at Kingsway and additional mowing services. The request and subsequent financials (Attachment 3) were presented to Administration, who agreed the costs were acceptable and the new baseline figure for 2015/16 should be $82,000 (plus GST).  

Responsibilities

Inclusion of section regarding additional mowing service provided by the club.

 

For number of years the WDCC has been undertaking additional mowing of the outfields to a standard approved by Administration. The additional mow creates a clean-cut short surface prior to weekend play. This practice has been ongoing with Administration’s agreement, however has not been covered in previous agreements.

 

As noted above, the WDCC recently undertook a tender process to test the market for turf wicket maintenance and also in preparation to renew their current Curator Contractor. This has resulted in the WDCC proposing a new annual figure of $82,000 (Attachment 3), applicable from the commencement of the new agreement in 2015. As with the previous agreement, this figure would be subject to an annual CPI increase.

 

The City’s Assets Directorate (Parks and Conservation Maintenance) have reviewed the tender submissions received by the WDCC and agreed that this sum is fair and reasonable.

 

As the Deed of Agreement is yet to be finalised, the WDCC is continuing to invoice the City based on an extension of the expired MOU that is based on an annual figure of $63,711. However, based on the revised tender price of $82,000, the WDCC will be in debt by $18,300 for the current financial year. As a result, this report will recommend that that this sum be paid to the Club to meet the additional expenses

Consultation

Consultation has occurred with the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club, the City’s Assets and Community & Place Directorates and the City Lawyer.

Comment

The review process undertaken prior to the expiry of the existing MOU has found that the current arrangement is beneficial to both the City and the Club, and that it represents value for money.

 

The subsequent continuation of the MOU is providing the Club with the necessary level of support for them to continue to maintain the turf wickets to the required level on the City’s behalf until such time as a new Deed of Agreement is completed. As a result, this report recommends that the agreement be continued for a further five years, taking the form of a Deed of Agreement rather than an MOU.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “2     Society - Healthy, safe, vibrant and active communities.

2.1    Great Places and Quality Lifestyle - People from different cultures find Wanneroo an exciting place to live with quality facilities and services.

 

“4      Civic Leadership – Working with others to ensure the best use of our resources.

          4.2     Build effective partnerships to deliver the community vision”

Risk Management Considerations

There is no envisaged enterprise risk associated with the implementation of the agreement.  Risks will be identified and managed using the City’s existing Risk Management framework.

 

Policy Implications

As noted within the Attachment 2, the City’s Weed Management Policy and Facility Hire and Use Policy are relevant to this process and are currently being reviewed.

Financial Implications

As noted within the report, the WDCC recently undertook a tender process to test the market for turf wicket maintenance, which has resulted in the WDCC proposing a new annual figure of $82,000, applicable from the commencement of the new agreement in 2015. As with the previous agreement, this figure would be subject to an annual CPI increase.

 

As the Deed of Agreement is yet to be finalised, the WDCC is continuing to invoice the City based on an extension of the expired MOU that is based on an annual figure of $63,711. However, based on the revised tender price of $82,000, the WDCC will be in debt by $18,300 for the current financial year. As a result, this report recommends that that this sum be paid to the Club to meet the additional expenses

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       AUTHORISES the Chief Executive Officer to prepare a Deed of Agreement, with the term of five years back dated to 1 September 2015, between the City and Wanneroo District Cricket Club including the following:

a.       contributing to the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club $82,000 per annum paid in two instalments of $41,000+gst each in September and February respectively and is subject to a CPI adjustment annually;

b.      supplying and maintaining the following equipment, for the use of the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club:

i.       Hamm Roller (Asset No 241832)

c.       Additional mow of outfield playing area prior to match play, as an addition over the standard currently provided.

2.       AUTHORISES the Chief Executive Officer to pay the balance of monies owing to the Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club of $18,300, being the difference between the current annual payment of $63,711 (based on the expired MOU) and the new proposed annual payment of $82,000.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Kingsway Sporting Complex. Area maintained by Wanneroo Districts Cricket Club

16/34980

 

2.

MOU 2010-2016

10/63021

 

3.

WDCC financials and request for increase

15/509975

 

 

 

 

   


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        111

Draft

Corporate Strategy & Performance

Business & Finance

3.21  2015/16 Mid Year Review of Annual Budget

File Ref:                                              23374 – 16/62327

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

 

Issue

To consider the Mid-Year Review of the Annual Budget for 2015/16.

 

Background

Regulation 33A of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 requires a local government to carry out a review of its Annual Budget for that year between 1 January and 31 March in each year.  Within 30 days after the review is carried out, the review is to be submitted to the Council for consideration. Council is to consider the review submitted to it and is to determine whether or not to adopt the review, any part of the review or any recommendations made in the review.  The Revised Budgets resulting from the Mid-Year review are detailed in (Attachments 1, 2 and 3) and are inclusive of endorsed amendments from Council and Mid-Year review recommendations.

 

Detail

Result from Operations is a Deficit of -$4.243 million, though this is an improvement over budget by $5.723 million.  This outcome primarily reflects an increase in Rate Income of $1.291 million, a reduction in Employee Costs of -$2.007 million, and a decrease in Materials & Contracts expenditure of -$1.048 million. 

 

With the Capital Works Program, the Revised Budget (post Mid-Year Review) is projected to be $74.267 million, representing a $5.734 million reduction, with some adjustments to be considered as part of the 2016/17 Budget deliberations and priorities within the Capital Works Program.

 

Budgeted Transfers from Reserves have reduced by $5.570 million which is attributable to the decreased requirement towards Capital Works from the mid-year review. Transfer to Reserves totals $4.278 million.

 

In summary, the City remains in a strong financial position and has adequate cash available to effectively operate.

 

Consultation

Internal stakeholders.

 

Comment

The mid-year review of the Annual Budget was undertaken during the month of January 2016 based on data as at the December 2015 month end. Commentaries on Revised Budgets as a result of the Mid-Year Review are provided below:

 

 

Income Statement (Refer to Attachment 1)

 

Operating Income

 

Rates

The full year forecast has increased the Rating Income by $1.291 million (+1%) to $131.897 million.  This is due to valuations taking place after the original budgets being approved and revising of rates to be charged.  As a result of the additional growth in rateable properties and values, the Annual Revised Budget for General Rates has been increased by +$0.075 million and Interim Rates by +$1.217 million.  The number of rateable properties has increased throughout this financial year from a budget of 71,825 to 74,699 as at the end of January.

 

Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions

During the Mid-Year Review process, the net adjustment to Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions was identified as a decrease to the adopted budget of -$0.075 million (-1%).  Items to note are an increase to Contributions, Reimbursements & Donations of $0.043 million and a decrease in Operating Grants and Subsidies of -$0.118 million.

 

Fees and Charges

The full year forecast is revised down by -$0.282 million (-1%), with the major accounts affecting income under this category being:

·        Application Licence Permit Fee Income increased by $0.139 million due to a forecast increase in Development Assessment Services.

·        Search Fee Income decreased by -$0.130 million within Building Assessment Services.

·        Engineering Supervision Fee Income decreased by -$0.150 million in Land Development Services.

·        User Entry Fee income decreased by -$0.091 million predominantly as a result of Aquamotion facility activity.

·        Green Fee Income decreased by -$0.087 million which relates to both Marangaroo and Carramar golf courses.

 

Interest Earnings

Based on the current forecast of available investment funds and interest rates for the balance of the financial year, the budget forecast will be increased by $0.401 million.

 

 

Other Revenue

The year-end forecast for the Other Revenue category presents an 11% increase of $0.076 million to $0.746 million.  This increase is mainly a result Fire Protection, Building Assessment and Road Drainage Service Income increases.  These were slightly offset by a reduction in Street Sign Income.

 


 

 

Operating Expenses

 

 

Employee Costs

The full year forecast for Employee Costs arising from the mid-year budget review have been adjusted down by -3% (-$2.007 million) to $73.173 million to reflect the anticipated year end results across this category at a corporate level.  It should be noted that the impact of the structural realignment has been factored into forecasts.  The reasons for the reduction are:

·        Prudent assumptions were used when developing the original budget.

·        Delay in anticipated increase for new enterprise agreement for salaried officers.

·        Increase in number & duration of vacancies.

 

Materials and Contracts

The full year Materials and Contracts budget is revised to $49.985 million, being a decrease of 2% ($1.048 million) comparing to Adopted Budget.  Explanations of the major areas of change are outlined below:

 

 

 

Fuel and Oil (-0.528 million) - The majority of the reduction in this expenditure category is a result of Domestic Waste Plant no longer being in commission.  This resulted in a decrease of -$0.400 million.  Another area of reduction was in the light vehicle fuel requirements which presented savings of -$0.080 million.

 

Contract Expenses (-$0.438 million) - This category includes a large range of accounts across all operational areas.  Overall there was a decrease in the revised budget by -$0.438 million.  The highest contributor of this was from the Park Irrigation and Park Equipment areas having a combined decrease of -$0.511 million.  Additionally the Park structures area resulted in an increase of $0.500 million which was further offset by reductions in a wide range of other areas.

 

Refuse Removal (-$0.341 million) - The majority of the savings within this expenditure category is a result of lower than originally anticipated general domestic rubbish which has produced a saving of -$0.335 million.  Another area where a saving has been identified is within Illegal Dumping expenditure (-$0.100 million).  These have been moderately reduced by an increase in recyclable rubbish expenditure ($0.170 million)

 

Utility Charges

The outcome of analysis at Mid-Year Review produced an increase expected by year-end of $0.064 million.  This is mainly attributed to an increase in street lighting. 

 

Depreciation

Based on year to date trend, the expected end of year forecast for Depreciation will be a reduction to the annual budget of -$1.343 million.  It should be noted that depreciation costs are accounting entries with no funding requirements.  Depreciation calculations are directly related to level and nature of capital works completed and physical assets transferred during the year.

 

Interest Expenses

The Interest Expenses directly relate to the fixed interest repayments of the $60.778 million loan agreement entered into with Western Australia Treasury Corporation in 2006.  There will be no change required to the Adopted Budget.

 

Insurance

The Mid-Year Review for Insurance indicated an increase of $0.024 million to the Annual Adopted Budget.  This is a result of an anticipated minor increase in insurance premiums within the Waste Domestic Plant area.  The City has placed a high priority on risk mitigation initiatives which, together with a rationalisation of its plant and fleet, is assisting to contain any increase in insurance costs.

 

Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions

The forecast end of year figure represents an overall decrease of -$1.961 million due to projects not proceeding or in some cases delayed.

 

Town Planning Schemes (TPS)

Latest planning activities have indicated developers’ contributions will be higher than the annual budget by $28.863 million.  This is a result of finalisation income from Cell 9 interim arrangements as well as additional lot creations in Cell 4.  These increases have been reduced by lower than anticipated lot creations in Cell 6.  This will however not affect operations as funds received in this category are held separately in restricted reserve accounts for future Scheme use.

 

With TPS Expenses the $37.218 million increase is a result of finalisation expenses for Cell 9 as well as land acquisition costs for Cell 6 and Cell 7.

 

Profit/ (Loss) on Asset Disposals

When assessing the end of year forecasts a slight adjustment has been identified during the mid-year review process (-$0.050 million).  Asset sales planned for the 2015/16 financial year relate to the plant and equipment replacement program and a distribution from the City's interest in Tamala Park Regional Council (TPRC), from land disposals.

 

Contributions of Physical Assets    

As at the end of December no figures have been recorded to account for this category and no change is proposed to the annual budget.

Capital Works Projects Adjustments – Mid Year Review (Refer to Attachment 2)

As part of the Mid-Year Budget Review the status of all projects on the 2015/16 Capital Works Program were closely evaluated.  This review has produced various adjustments to the projects, as detailed in Attachment 2.  These adjustments have resulted in a net reduction in the capital works program of $5.734 million, with the post mid-year review Revised Budget projected to be $74.267 million.

 

With particular attention paid to the timing of the spending on large projects, there have been a number of projects relinquishing funds in 2015/16 to be reconsidered during the 2016/17 Capital Works Budget deliberations.

 

Some of the major deferrals, and the explanations for them, are as follows:

·        Civic Centre extension (PR-2332) – Funds deferred as the contractor will most likely not be appointed until May 2016.

·        Yanchep/Two Rocks - district playing fields (PR-2072), district sports amenities building (PR-2253) – Progress on these projects is dependent on the developer completing initial earthworks, which have been delayed.

·        Flynn Drive (PR-1494) – Stage 2 has been placed on hold pending the outcome of another Federal funding application, due in June 2016.

·        Quinns Mindarie Surf Life Saving Club (PR-1121) – delays with planning process through WA Planning Commission.

 

Rate Setting Statement (Refer to Attachment 3)

The Rate Setting Statement outlined in Attachment 3 represents a composite view of the finances of the City, identifying the movement in the surplus/(deficit), primarily based on the operations and capital works revenue and expenditure, and resulting rating income required.

 

Statutory Compliance

This report complies with Section 6.4 of the Local Government Act 1995 and Regulations 33A and 34 of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “4     Civic Leadership - Working with others to ensure the best use of our resources.

4.3    A Strong and Progressive Organisation - You will recognise the hard work and professionalism delivered by your council through your interactions and how our community is developing.

 

Risk Management Considerations

The tables below outline the Strategic and Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Integrated Planning and Reporting

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Long Term Financial Plan

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

As outlined above and detailed in Attachments 1, 2 and 3.

 

Whilst the Result from Operations post mid-year review reflects a $5.723 million improvement, it however remains a deficit, of -$4.243 million.  When recognising the early part payment from the Grants Commission for 2015/16 of approximately $3.196 million (received in June 2015) a much closer to balanced result is observed. 

 

Of the $5.734 million reduction in Capital Works budget as a result of the mid-year review, a large proportion is merely deferred to be considered in 2016/17.  With regard to the financial impact on Municipal funds an additional draw of $0.218 is identified.

 

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council on the recommendation of the Audit and Risk Committee:-

1.       ENDORSES the Mid-Year Review of the Annual Budget for the 2015/16 financial year as outlined in the attachments to the report, in accordance with Regulation 33A of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, inclusive of;

a.       Increase in Transfer to Reserves of $4,278,431, and

b.      Of the transfer to reserves, $800,000 to be specifically allocated to the Asset Replacement Reserve for the replacement of the HR Information System during the 2016/17 financial year.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

MYR - Income Statement by N&T

16/30036

Minuted

2.

Capital Works - MYR

16/62340

Minuted

3.

MYR - Rate Setting Statement

16/30031

Minuted

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        119

Draft

3.22  Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 31 December 2015

File Ref:                                              20794 – 16/52577

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 December 2015.

 

Background

In accordance with Local Government Regulations, the Financial Activity Statement has been prepared in compliance with the following:

 

1.       Regulation 34(1) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to prepare a statement of financial activity each month, presented according to nature and type, by program, or by business unit.  For the 2015/16 financial year Council will present the statement of financial activity by nature and type.

 

2.       Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to adopt a percentage or value, calculated in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, to be used in statements of financial activity for reporting material variances.  For the 2015/16 financial year Council will use 10% for the reporting of variances.

Detail

YEAR TO DATE RESULT FROM OPERATIONS

Overall Comment

The Result from Operations for the City to December month end presents an overall favourable variance of $16.786 million (+29%) to YTD budget. Operating Revenue presented a favourable variance to YTD budget of $3.049 million (2%).  Expenditures from Operations also present a favourable variance to budget of $13.737 million (+15%) with the main contributors being Materials and Contracts (+$6.639 million) and Employee costs (+$6.336 million).

 

Consultation

Nil

 

Comment

The figures within this report reflect the Revised Budget where changes have been made.

 

Below is a table which highlights the financial activity for the month of December 2015. Included in the table are the month’s revenues and expenditures by category, with corresponding budgets and variances.

 

In accordance with the requirement of Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, the commentaries on 10% variances to budget in the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 December 2015 are provided below. 

 

CURRENT MONTH

 

The below table highlights the operating performance for the City of Wanneroo for the month of November and identifies variances to budget for each category of income and expense. The following colours have been used to categorise levels of variance:

·           Green >+10%

·           Orange <+/-10%

·           Red >-10% 

 

 

The month of December produced an overall favourable net result of 33% ($3.220 million).  Within operating revenues a positive variance (23%) was achieved. This is predominantly a result of interim rates revenue receipts exceeding anticipated.

 

Operating expenses displayed a positive variance (6%) mainly through lower material expenses as well as employee costs.

 

Other revenue and expenses produced a positive variance (86%) which was achieved through Town Planning Scheme revenues.

 

The graphs below illustrate the various operating income categories for each month within the City of Wanneroo and are compared against their respective monthly budgets.  Rates have been excluded as almost the entire income for this category is received in one month. Rates income is however presented in a graph further in this report titled “Operating Revenues – Cumulative YTD (Actual vs Budget)” -

 

 

The following graphs represent the operating expenditure for each month and are compared against their respective monthly budgets. Depreciation has been excluded as it is not a cash item and not relevant for the intent of the report. As with Rates Income, Depreciation is presented in a graph further in this report titled “Operating Expenses – Cumulative YTD (Actual vs Budget)”.

 

 

Income Statement (Refer to Attachment 1)

 

 

Year to Date Net Result

 

The year to date Net Result presented a favourable result of $9.941 million (+13%).  Detail to the variances is outlined in the corresponding sections below for Operating Revenues, Operating Expenses and Other Revenue and Expenses.

 

The following information is provided on key aspects of the YTD financial results:

 

Operating Revenues

 

 

The Year to December produced a positive variance of $3.049 million (+2%) within operating revenues.  Further detail to the variance within each income category is provided below as well as a bar graph illustrating the corresponding dollar amounts.

 

 

Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions (Actual $5.3 million, Revised Budget $4.8 million)

As at 31 December 2015 the YTD variance for Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions was $0.517 million (+11%).  This is still a result positive from the receipt of a Kidsport grant ($0.425 million) for the 2015/16 year in July. This has been somewhat offset by lower Department of Fire Emergency Services grants.  

 

Contributing to the positive variance is a Department of Education grant ($0.212 million) as well as Reimbursement Income which produced a positive variance of $0.104 million.

 

Other Income (Actual $0.5 million, Revised Budget $0.3 million)

This income category shows a positive year to date variance of 62% ($0.209 million).  This continues to be almost entirely attributed to a receipt by the City Growth department ($0.136 million) which relates to DCP preparation costs in the Alkimos/Eglington development.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating Expenses to December show a positive variance of $13.737 million.  The above table highlights the month, YTD and full budget results which are further expanded on in the below section.  As with operating revenue a bar graph is also included illustrating the dollar expenditure categories –

 

 

 

Employee Costs (Actual $31.1 million, Revised Budget $37.4 million)

The financial year to December produced a positive variance of 17% (+$6.336 million).  This is mainly attributed to lower than budgeted salary expenditure (+$3.859 million variance) as well as lower than budgeted wage expenses (+$1.228 million variance) which are both a result of vacant positions as well as enterprise agreements yet to be finalised and realised.  Closely related to both salaries and wages expenditure is lower superannuation expenditure which amounts to $0.762 million positive variance to December.

 

Training course fee expenditure continues to present a positive variance to date
 (+$0.193 million).  These expenses reflect month to month activity and therefore are subject to variances throughout the year.

 

Materials and Contracts (Actual $18.8 million, Revised Budget $25.5 million)

The Materials and Contracts expense category reflect a YTD variance of +26% ($6.639 million).  The main contributor for this relates to Contract expenses which produced a positive variance of +$3.739 million.  Within Contract expenses the main areas that contribute to the variance are in Bushland Maintenance, Park Irrigation Equipment Maintenance, Park Equipment Maintenance and Residential Road Land Maintenance. These expenses are budgeted on a monthly basis as the contract requirements occur as and when needed.

Refuse removal expenses also produced a positive variance in December (+$0.603 million).  This variance relates to domestic rubbish collection expenses however being offset moderately through higher than budgeted expenditure in bulk rubbish expenditure.

General material expenses have produced a positive variance of +$0.604 million.  This category covers a large amount of expenses of which the higher contributors to the variance include Park Irrigation Equipment, Domestic Waste Plant Maintenance, Maintain Park Structures and Residential Road Land Maintenance. All of these areas have a combined variance of $0.221 million.

 

It is also noted that software expenses produced an adverse YTD variance of -$0.472 million due to licences being renewed earlier than budgeted.

 

Other Revenue and Expenses

 

Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions (Actual $3.8 million, Revised Budget $7.3 million)

 

At the end of December the income within this category was $3.758 million which displays a variance of $-3.568 million (-49%). The main contributor is the receipts of main roads grants. These grants are paid on a project progression basis and thus are driven by works performed which varies on a month to month basis. Non-operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions relate directly to the external funding towards capital projects. The main contributor to the variance is within the grants for Pavement Seal works.

 

TPS Revenues (Actual $12.5 million, Revised Budget $9.7 million)

This category of income produced a favourable variance to December of 29% ($2.822 million).  This is attributed to lot sale contributions across various cells.  The cells with YTD favourable variances are Cell 4 ($2.170 million) and Cell 9
($4.626 million). It is noted that this variance was marginally reduced by cells with adverse YTD activity.  These cells were, Cell 2 (-$0.122 million), Cell 5 (-$0.896 million), Cell 6
(-$1.790 million), Cell 7 (-$0.171 million) and Cell 8 (-$0.360 million).

 

As with TPS expenses these categories of income do not impact the City’s municipal operations. 

 

TPS Expenses (Actual $4.3 million, Revised Budget $1.7 million)

TPS Expenses for the year to December total $4.285 million which has produced an unfavourable variance of -156% (-$2.610 million) YTD against budget.  These expenditures relate to specific costs and land purchases within the Scheme locations and have no impact on municipal accounts.

 

Profit/Loss on Asset Disposals (Actual $0.4 million, Revised Budget $3.9 million)

As at December month end the City has a total of $0.508 million profit recorded in sales of assets. The income compiled from predominantly the sale of land proceeds distributed from the Tamala Park Regional Council. Additionally there was some profit recorded on sale of plant.  The profits have been somewhat offset by loss on asset sales throughout the city totalling -$0.113 million.  Whilst the net YTD variance is -$3.883 million (-102%) the nature and timing of sale of assets cannot be determined with certainty, budgets may or may not align on a monthly basis.

 

Contributions of Physical Assets

Each year developers hand over physical assets such as parklands, roads and pathways to the City, for its ongoing management and control.  It should be noted that variations on the amounts of contributions of physical assets comparing to budget has no direct impact to the City’s current financial year results, but can have a significant impact on future servicing, maintenance and renewal costs needing to be factored into the Long Term Financial Plan.  The scale of the value of assets handed over to the City in the past has generally aligned closely to the % increase in the number of new Lots created during the financial year. 

 

Balance Sheet (Refer to Attachment 2)

Capital Works Program (Refer Attachment 5)

The current status of the Capital Works Program as of 31 December 2015 is summarised below by Program Category:-

 

 

To further expand on the capital works program information above, key infrastructure projects are selected to be reported on, on a regular basis, which are itemised on the Top Capital Projects attachment to this report: (Refer to Attachment 5)

 

Investment Portfolio Summary (Refer to Attachment 3)

 

In accordance with the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, the City only invests in the following highly secured investments effective from 1 August 2012:

 

1.       Deposits with authorised deposit taking institutions and the Western Australian Treasury Corporation for a term not exceeding 12 months;

2.       Bonds that are guaranteed by the Commonwealth Government or a State or Territory for a term not exceeding three years; and

3.       Australian currency.

 

As at 31 December 2015, the City holds an investment portfolio (cash and cash equivalents) of $349.511 million (Face Value).  Interest earnings were budgeted at 2.75% yield.  For the financial YTD ending December 2015, Council’s investment portfolio return has exceeded the bank bill index benchmark by 0.55% pa (2.88% pa vs. 2.33% pa).

 

Displayed below are graphical representations of the portfolio performance and earnings:

 

Note: Interest Earnings = Interest on investments plus Rates Instalment and Penalty Income.

 

 

Rate Setting Statement (Refer to Attachment 4)

The Rate Setting Statement outlined in Attachment 4 represents a composite view of the finances of the City, identifying the movement in the surplus/(deficit), primarily based on the operations and capital works revenue and expenditure, and resulting rating income required.

 

Statutory Compliance

This monthly financial report complies with Section 6.4 of the Local Government Act 1995 and Regulations 33A and 34 of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “4     Civic Leadership - Working with others to ensure the best use of our resources.

4.3    A Strong and Progressive Organisation - You will recognise the hard work and professionalism delivered by your council through your interactions and how our community is developing.

 

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

As outlined above and detailed in Attachments 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council RECEIVES the Financial Activity Statements and commentaries on variances to YTD Budget for the period ended 31 December 2015, consisting of:

 

1.       2015/16 Annual Adopted and Revised Budget;

 

2.       December 2015 YTD Revised Budget;

 

3.       December 2015 YTD Income and Expenditure;

 

4.       December 2015 YTD Material Variance Notes; and

 

5.       December 2015 YTD Net Current Assets.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

December Income Statement

16/12278

Minuted

2.

December Balance Sheet

16/12279

Minuted

3.

December Inv

16/12284

Minuted

4.

December RSS

16/12285

Minuted

5.

Top Capital Projects - December 2015

15/511565[v6]

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        128

Draft

3.23  Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 31 January 2016

File Ref:                                              12606 – 16/52485

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 January 2016.

 

Background

In accordance with Local Government Regulations, the Financial Activity Statement has been prepared in compliance with the following:

 

1.       Regulation 34(1) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to prepare a statement of financial activity each month, presented according to nature and type, by program, or by business unit.  For the 2015/16 financial year Council will present the statement of financial activity by nature and type.

 

2.       Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to adopt a percentage or value, calculated in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, to be used in statements of financial activity for reporting material variances.  For the 2015/16 financial year Council will use 10% for the reporting of variances.

Detail

YEAR TO DATE RESULT FROM OPERATIONS

Overall Comment

The Result from Operations for the City to January month-end presents an overall favourable variance of +$18.775 million (+39%) to YTD budget. Operating Revenue presented a favourable variance to YTD budget of +$3.196 million (+2%).  Expenditures from Operations also present a favourable variance to budget of +$15.579 million (+15%), with the main contributors being Materials & Contracts (+$7.659 million) and Employee Costs (+$7.025 million).

Consultation

Nil

 

Comment

The figures within this report reflect the Revised Budget where changes have been made.

 

Below is a table which highlights the financial activity for the month of January 2016. Included in the table are the month’s revenues and expenditures by category, with corresponding budgets and variances.

 

In accordance with the requirement of Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, the commentaries on 10% variances to budget in the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 January 2016 are provided below. 

 

CURRENT MONTH

 

The below table highlights the operating performance for the City of Wanneroo for the month of January and identifies variances to budget for each category of income and expense. The following colours have been used to categorise levels of variance:

·           Green >+10%

·           Orange <+/-10%

·           Red >-10% 

 

 

The month of January produced an overall unfavourable net result of -83% (-$6.240 million).  Within Operating Revenues a positive variance (+4%) was achieved. This is predominantly a result of Interim Rates revenue receipts exceeding anticipated.

 

Operating Expenses displayed a positive variance (+13%) mainly through lower Material Expenses and Employee Costs.

 

Other Revenue & Expenses produced an unfavourable variance (-254%) which was a result of Town Planning Scheme Expenses.

 

The graphs below illustrate the various operating income categories for each month within the City of Wanneroo and are compared against their respective monthly budgets.  Rates have been excluded as almost the entire income for this category is received in one month. Rates income is however presented in a graph further in this report titled “Operating Revenues – Cumulative YTD (Actual vs Budget)” -

 

     

 

The following graphs represent the operating expenditure for each month and are compared against their respective monthly budgets. Depreciation has been excluded as it is not a cash item and not relevant for the intent of the report. As with Rates Income, Depreciation is presented in a graph further in this report titled “Operating Expenses – Cumulative YTD (Actual vs Budget)”.

 

Income Statement (Refer to Attachment 1)

 

 

Year to Date Net Result

 

The year to date Net Result presented a favourable result of +$5.040 million (+7%).  Detail to the variances is outlined in the corresponding sections below for Operating Revenues, Operating Expenses and Other Revenue & Expenses.

 

The following information is provided on key aspects of the YTD financial results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Revenues

 

 

The Year to January produced a positive variance of +$3.196 million (+2%) within Operating Revenues.  Further detail to the variance within each income category is provided below as well as a bar graph illustrating the corresponding dollar amounts.

 

 

Other Income (Actual $0.6 million, Revised Budget $0.4 million)

This income category shows a positive year to date variance of +50% (+$0.198 million).  The main contributor to the positive variance relates to a receipt by the City Growth department (+$0.136 million) which relates to Developer Contribution preparation costs in the Alkimos/Eglington development.

 

 


 

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating Expenses to January present a positive variance of +$15.579 million.  The above table highlights the month, YTD and full budget results which are further expanded on in the below section.  As with Operating Revenue, a bar graph is also included illustrating the dollar expenditure categories –

 

 

 

Employee Costs (Actual $36.2 million, Revised Budget $43.2 million)

The financial year to January produced a positive variance of +16% (+$7.025 million).  This is mainly attributed to lower than budgeted Salary Expenses (+$4.236 million variance) as well as lower than budgeted Wage Expenses (+$1.369 million variance) which are both a result of vacant positions as well as enterprise agreements yet to be finalised and realised.  Closely related to both salaries and wages expenditure is lower Superannuation Expenses which amounts to a +$0.859 million positive variance to January. Training Course fee expenditure continues to present a positive variance to date (+$0.281 million).  These expenses reflect month to month activity and therefore are subject to variances throughout the year.

 

Materials & Contracts (Actual $22.2 million, Revised Budget $29.9 million)

The Materials & Contracts Expense category reflects a YTD variance of +26% (+$7.659 million).  The main contributor for this relates to Contract Expenses, which produced a positive variance of +$4.489 million.  Within Contract Expenses the main areas that contribute to the variance are in Bushland Maintenance, Park Irrigation Equipment Maintenance, Park Equipment Maintenance and Residential Road Land Maintenance. These expenses are budgeted on a monthly basis as the contract requirements occur as and when needed.

Fuel & Oil Expenses have also produced a positive variance to January (+$0.560 million). This is largely contributed by the lower than anticipated fuel requirements within Domestic Plant facilities.

Refuse Removal Expenses also produced a positive variance in January (+$0.417 million).  This variance relates to Domestic Rubbish Collection expenses however being offset moderately through higher than budgeted expenditure in Bulk Rubbish expenditure.

Material Expenses have produced a positive variance of +$0.744 million.  This category covers a large amount of expenses of which the higher contributors to the variance include Park Irrigation Equipment, Domestic Waste Plant Maintenance, Maintain Park Structures and Residential Road Land Maintenance. All of these areas have a combined variance of +$0.278 million.

 

It is also noted that Software Expenses produced an adverse YTD variance of -$0.374 million due to licences being renewed earlier than budgeted.

 

Other Revenue and Expenses

         

Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies & Contributions (Actual $4.2 million, Revised Budget $8.1 million)

 

At the end of January the income within this category was $4.246 million which resulted in a variance of $-3.897 million (-48%). The main contributor is the receipts of main roads grants. These grants are paid on a project progression basis and thus are driven by works performed which varies on a month to month basis. Non-operating Grants, Subsidies & Contributions relate directly to the external funding towards capital projects. The main contributor to the variance is within the grants for Pavement Seal works.

 

Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Revenues (Actual $13.7 million, Revised Budget $11.3 million)

This category of income produced a favourable variance to January of +21% (+$2.404 million).  This is attributed to Lot sale contributions across various TPS Cells.  The Cells with YTD favourable variances are Cell 2 (+$0.325 million), Cell 4 (+$1.976 million) and Cell 9 (+$4.777 million).  It is noted that this variance was marginally reduced by Cells with adverse YTD activity.  These Cells were, Cell 5 (-$1.050 million), Cell 6 (-$2.195 million), Cell 7 (-$0.237 million) and Cell 8 (-$0.442 million).  As with TPS Expenses these categories of income do not impact the City’s municipal operations.

 

TPS Expenses (Actual $11.9 million, Revised Budget $2.8 million)

TPS Expenses for the year to January total $11.861 million which has produced an unfavourable variance of -317% (-$9.016 million) YTD against budget.  These expenditures relate to specific costs and land purchases within the Scheme locations and have no impact on municipal accounts.

 

Profit/Loss on Asset Disposals (Actual $1.3 million, Revised Budget $4.5 million)

As at January month end the City has a total of $1.418 million profit recorded in sales of assets. The income compiled from predominantly the sale of land proceeds distributed from the Tamala Park Regional Council. Additionally there was some profit recorded on sale of plant.  The profits have been somewhat offset by loss on asset sales throughout the city totalling -$0.114 million.  Whilst the net YTD variance is -$3.226 million (-71%) the nature and timing of sale of assets cannot be determined with certainty, budgets may or may not align on a monthly basis.

 

Contributions of Physical Assets

Each year developers hand over physical assets such as parklands, roads and pathways to the City, for its ongoing management and control.  It should be noted that variations on the amounts of contributions of physical assets comparing to budget has no direct impact to the City’s current financial year results, but can have a significant impact on future servicing, maintenance and renewal costs needing to be factored into the Long Term Financial Plan.  The scale of the value of assets handed over to the City in the past has generally aligned closely to the % increase in the number of new Lots created during the financial year. 

 

Balance Sheet (Refer to Attachment 2)

Capital Works Program

The current status of the Capital Works Program as of 31 January 2016 is summarised below by Program Category:-

 

To further expand on the capital works program information above, key infrastructure projects are selected to be reported on, on a regular basis, which are itemised on the Top Capital Projects attachment to this report: (Refer to Attachment 5)

 

Investment Portfolio Summary (Refer to Attachment 3)

 

In accordance with the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, the City only invests in the following highly secured investments effective from 1 August 2012:

 

1.       Deposits with authorised deposit taking institutions and the Western Australian Treasury Corporation for a term not exceeding 12 months;

2.       Bonds that are guaranteed by the Commonwealth Government or a State or Territory for a term not exceeding three years; and

3.       Australian currency.

 

As at 31 January 2016, the City holds an investment portfolio (cash & cash equivalents) of $344.623 million (Face Value).  Interest Earnings were budgeted at a 2.75% yield.  For the financial YTD ending January 2016, Council’s investment portfolio return has exceeded the Bank Bill index benchmark by 0.62% pa (2.89% pa vs. 2.27% pa).

 

Displayed below are graphical representations of the portfolio performance and earnings:

 

Note: Interest Earnings = Interest on investments plus Rates Instalment and Penalty Income.

 

 


 

Rate Setting Statement (Refer to Attachment 4)

The Rate Setting Statement outlined in Attachment 4 represents a composite view of the finances of the City, identifying the movement in the Surplus/(Deficit), primarily based on the operations and capital works revenue & expenditure, and resulting Rating Income required.

 

Statutory Compliance

 

This monthly financial report complies with Section 6.4 of the Local Government Act 1995 and Regulations 33A and 34 of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “4     Civic Leadership - Working with others to ensure the best use of our resources.

4.3    A Strong and Progressive Organisation - You will recognise the hard work and professionalism delivered by your council through your interactions and how our community is developing.

 

<Insert futher Strategic Implications if required…>

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

 

Financial Implications

As outlined above and detailed in Attachments 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council RECEIVES the Financial Activity Statements and commentaries on variances to YTD Budget for the period ended 31 January 2016, consisting of:

 

1.       2015/16 Annual Adopted and Revised Budget;

 

2.       January 2016 YTD Revised Budget;

 

3.       January 2016 YTD Income and Expenditure;

 

4.       January 2016 YTD Material Variance Notes; and

 

5.       January 2016 YTD Net Current Assets.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

January Income Statement

16/62414

 

2.

January 2016 Balance Sheet

16/62426

 

3.

January Inv

16/62429

 

4.

January RSS

16/62430

 

5.

Top Capital Projects - January 2016

15/511565[v7]

 

 

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        139

Draft

Strategic & Business Planning

3.24  Three-Year Strategic Internal Audit Plan

File Ref:                                              24758 – 16/58183

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider the Three-Year Strategic Internal Audit Plan (Plan) prepared by the City of Wanneroo’s (the City) Internal Audit Service Provider - William Buck Consulting (WA) Pty Ltd (William Buck), as recommended by Audit and Risk Committee.

Background

Council at its meeting on 13 October 2015 accepted Tender No. 01527 from William Buck for the provision of Internal Audit Services for a period of 33 months from 1 October 2015 to 30 June 2018 with the option to extend the contract for a further two 12-month periods at the discretion of the City.

 

The contract commenced in October 2015 and a short term internal audit work plan was presented to the Audit and Risk Committee meeting of 17 November 2015.  In accordance with the short term internal audit work plan, the Plan has been developed by William Buck in conjunction with Administration. It is intended that going forward this will be a three year rolling plan.

 

The plan was presented to the Audit and Risk Committee on 16 February 2016 for recommendation to Council for adoption.

Detail

The Plan was developed using a risk-based approach targeting areas of high risk and where there is a need to improve management of risk, internal control and compliance.  In developing the plan, William Buck:

·        Obtained the City’s risk registers;

·        Consolidated the risks at a summary level into one register;

·        Allocated risks to a potential auditable area of review; and

·        Sorted the auditable areas mainly by the risk rating.

 

The factors below have also been taken into consideration in the formulation of this plan:

·        The maturity of the existing management systems;

·        The previous three-year Strategic Internal Audit Plan presented by KPMG to the Audit and Risk Committee meeting of 15 March 2011 and any further changes to that plan; and

·        Internal audits conducted by both internal and external resources in the past four years.

 

Through the above activities, potential internal audits were identified and prioritised for the period 1 December 2015 to 30 June 2018 in consultation with Administration.

 

Indicative scopes have been included in the Plan for the audit areas proposed for delivery in the current financial year (2015/16).  The scopes will be further refined through discussions with Administration once the Strategic Three-Year Internal Audit Plan is approved by Council.

 

The details of the Strategic Three-Year Internal Audit Plan are provided in Attachment 1.

Consultation

The status of improvement plans has been noted to ensure audits are scheduled appropriately in consultation with relevant Directors and through discussions at the Executive Leadership Meeting on 4 February 2016.

Comment

Administration is in agreement with the Plan which makes provision for the conduct of internal audits to assist the organisation with strengthening of internal controls.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “4     Civic Leadership - Working with others to ensure the best use of our resources.

4.3    A Strong and Progressive Organisation - You will recognise the hard work and professionalism delivered by your council through your interactions and how our community is developing.

 

Risk Management Considerations

There is no existing Strategic or Corporate Risk within the City’s existing risk registers which relates to the issue contained within this report however the Plan has been developed to assist Administration in evaluating their processes for identifying, assessing and managing the key operational, financial and compliance exposures of the City.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

The cost of implementing the Strategic Three-Year Internal Audit Plan will be met through the City's operating budget. 

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

Recommendation

That Council on the recommendation of the Audit and Risk Committee ADOPTS the Strategic Internal Audit Plan for the three years 2015/16 – 2017/18 as detailed in Attachment 1.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Strategic Internal Audit Plan - City of Wanneroo.pdf

16/23086

Minuted

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 23 February, 2016                        142

Draft

3.25  Mid-Year Review of Corporate Business Plan Progress 2014/15

File Ref:                                              19097 – 16/51744

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider the Mid-Year Corporate Business Plan (CBP) Progress Report for 2015/16.

 

Background

The City undertakes both internal and external reporting to demonstrate that the business is aligning its resourcing, priorities and service delivery appropriately.  Reporting on performance and achievement of the Corporate Business Plan (CBP) is provided externally through the following:

·        Quarterly Performance Reports

·        Annual Reports

 

The purpose of the Mid-Year CBP Progress Report (Attachment 1) is to provide feedback on the performance of the City on major capital projects and operational priorities

Detail

Corporate Business Plan (CBP) 2015-2019

The City’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework requires development of a four-year CBP to demonstrate progress in achieving the objectives of the Strategic Community Plan; it also commits to providing quarterly reports on progress against the annual objectives and priorities. The Mid-Year CBP Progress Report provides an overview of the City’s performance against the priorities listed in the CBP and the top 23 Capital Projects.

This report was presented to the Audit and Risk Committee on 16 February 2016 for consideration and has been endorsed for reporting to Council subject to a couple of recommendations. The attached report contains the amendments that were recommended by the Committee.

 

Consultation

Administration was consulted in preparing the Mid-Year Corporate Business Plan Progress Report.

 

Comment

Corporate Business Plan (CBP) Actions 2015/16

 

Operational Actions

There are 98 operational actions listed for delivery over the four years of the 2015-2019 CBP:

 

·        80 of the 98 actions (82%) continue from the previous financial year or are due to start in the current (2015/16) financial year.

·        65 of the 80 actions (81%) are either completed or on target as at 31 December 2015.

·        41 of these 80 actions (51%) are due for completion in 2015/16 whilst 39 of these 80 actions are due in outer years.

·        36 of these 41 actions (88%) that are due for completion in 2015/16 are on target for successful completion; the 5 remaining actions are proposed for deferral to 2016/17.

·        2 actions are currently listed as under target as at 31 December 2015 though it is anticipated that these will be completed within the agreed timeframe of 30 June 2016

The table below shows a snapshot of the Mid-Year CBP status:

CBP Operational Action Status

Total Actions

Completed

On Target

Under target

On hold

80

8

57

13

2

 

Corporate Business Plan Actions to be deferred: Completion dates for the following items are proposed for deferral until 2016/17:

 

Action

Revised Completion Date

Comment

1.      Prepare a draft Part 2 Coastal Management Plan

30/06/2017

Recent changes to State Government Policy now require that the City prepare a Coastal Hazard Risk Management Adaption Plan. The Plan should be completed towards the end of 2016 and will assist in determining the location of future coastal assets; this will be used to inform the preparation of the Coastal Management Plan Part 2.

2.      Implement a strategy for green waste recycling by June 2016

30/06/2017

Development of this strategy is in progress. An implementation plan has been developed and will be finalised ahead of June 2016, although it is anticipated that the strategy will be implemented within the 2016/17 financial year.

3.      Implement Strategic Waste Management Plan by June 2016

30/06/2017

The Plan will be completed by June 2016 and implementation will be deferred to July 2016.

4.      Prepare a draft Local Planning Scheme No. 3

30/06/2017

Project has been delayed due to the release of the new Local Planning Scheme Regulations and draft North West Corridor Sub-Regional Framework. A draft Local Planning Scheme No.3 will not be finalised by the end of the 2015/16 financial year. Administration will workshop a new Scheme with a view to finalising a draft in the 2016/17 financial year.

5.     Develop a revised Early Childhood Strategy 2016/17–2018/19 by June 2016

30/06/2017

The City’s current Early Childhood Strategy was endorsed for the period January 2014 to December 2016 and planning and consultation has commenced for the next strategy. This will be finalised by December 2016.

6.     Develop the 2015/16 Strategic Community Plan by June 2016

31/08/2016

The current Strategic Community Plan is being reviewed and a revised plan will be developed by August 2016.

7.     Biennial review of the City’s Code of Conduct by June 2016

30/11/2016

Initial research and comparisons with other local governments' Codes of Conduct has been completed. Re-drafted document will be submitted to Executive in August 2016 and it expected to be presented to Council in November 2016.

8.     Conduct eight–year Local Law Review by June 2016

31/12/2016

The following local laws are anticipated to be presented to Council in the second half of 2016: Health; Meeting Procedures and Bushfire Brigades.

9.     Develop a Strategic Policy Framework by June 2016

30/10/2016

The current policy framework is to be reviewed to ensure that it meets strategic objectives. This work will commence in February 2016 and is expected to be completed by the end of September 2016.

10.  Develop and implement a centralised Contract Management Framework

30/10/2016

The Contract Management System has been purchased and will be implemented from mid–January 2016. The Framework will be finalised in the new financial year. The finish date should, therefore, be deferred to 2016/17 financial year.

11.  Implement the Organisational Governance Framework by June 2016

 

30/12/2016

Research and benchmarking against other local governments in respect of the Governance Framework is complete. Initial draft of Governance Framework to be provided for review in early 2016. Implementation of the Governance Framework, including delivery of associated training, to be completed by December 2016.

 

Deferral of most of the above actions will have no significant impact on the operating budget for 2016/17 as most of the costs for these actions have been or will be incurred during 2015/16. The exceptions are ‘Conduct eight-year Local Law Review’ and ‘Implement the Organisational Governance Framework’ which will require additional funds in the region of $30,000 which will be budgeted for as part of the 2016/17 planning and budgeting process.

 

Capital Projects by Sub Program

There are 23 Capital Works Sub Programs reflected in the CBP incorporating 274 capital projects under these 23 sub programs.  28% of the overall annual budget was spent as at 31 December 2015.  The financial commitments as at 31 December 2015 were 22% of the overall annual budget.

 

Sub-Program

No. of Projects

2015/16 Adjusted Budget ($)

Year To Date Actual Expenditure ($)

% Spent at 31 Dec. 15

Life To Date Commitments ($)

Available Funds ($)

Bus Shelters

2

110,000

385

0%

93,381

16,234

Community Buildings

32

11,012,465

3,362,028

31%

4,237,329

3,413,108

Community Safety

4

535,601

116,751

22%

25,665

393,185

Conservation Reserves

5

260,273

117,699

45%

71,977

70,597

Corporate Buildings

9

5,127,161

710,298

14%

1,232,616

3,184,247

Environmental Offset

4

593,710

124,327

21%

246,555

222,828

Fleet Management — Corporate

7

5,587,441

2,080,623

37%

954,108

2,552,710

Foreshore Management

11

1,944,719

299,668

15%

204,078

1,440,973

Golf Courses

6

1,705,967

238,122

14%

430,503

1,037,342

Investment Projects

11

4,606,134

1,993,455

43%

230,588

2,382,091

IT Equipment & Software

6

1,802,506

548,036

30%

601,882

652,588

Other Corporate Items

7

309,482

190,680

62%

1,141

117,661

Parks Furniture

11

1,558,143

333,016

21%

655,959

569,168

Parks Rehabilitation

1

2,650,000

559,000

21%

625,102

1,465,898

Passive Park Development

10

1,050,835

233,561

22%

138,483

678,791

Pathways and Trails

24

881,825

212,229

24%

371,872

297,724

Roads

19

20,629,784

6,690,959

32%

4,740,479

9,198,346