Proof_CouncilAgenda_Coverpage_Template_Governance

 

 

 

Council Agenda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm, 06 February 2018

Council Chambers, Civic Centre, Dundebar Road, Wanneroo


PUBLIC QUESTION AND STATEMENT TIME

 

1.           TIME PERMITTED

A minimum of 15 minutes is permitted for public questions at each Council Meeting.  If there are not sufficient questions to fill the allocated time, the person presiding will move to the next item.  If there are more questions than can be considered within 15 minutes, the person presiding will determine whether to extend question time. Each person seeking to ask questions during public question time may address the Council for a maximum of 3 minutes each. 

 

2.           PROTOCOLS

No member of the public may interrupt the meeting’s proceedings or enter into conversation. 

 

Members of the public wishing to ask a question/s at the Council Meeting are to register on the night at the main reception desk located outside of the Chamber.  Members of the public wishing to submit written questions are requested to lodge them with the Chief Executive Officer at least 30 hours prior to the start of the meeting (that is by noon on the day before the meeting).

 

The person presiding will control public question time and ensure that each person wishing to ask a question is given a fair and equal opportunity to do so.  Members of the public wishing to ask a question should state his or her name and address before asking the question.  If the question relates to an item on the agenda, the item number should be stated.

 

3.           GENERAL RULES

The following general rules apply to public question and statement time:

·             Questions and statements should only relate to the business of the local government and should not be a statement or personal opinion.

·             Only questions relating to matters affecting the local government will be considered at an ordinary meeting, and only questions that relate to the purpose of the meeting will be considered at a special meeting. 

·             Questions may be taken on notice and responded to after the meeting.

·             Questions may not be directed at specific Elected Members or Employees.

·             Questions are not to be framed in such a way as to reflect adversely on a particular Elected Member or Employee.

·             First priority will be given to persons who are asking questions relating to items on the current meeting agenda.

·             Second priority will be given to public statements.  Only statements regarding items on the agenda under consideration will be heard.

 

DEPUTATIONS

 

An informal session will be held on the same day as the Council meeting at the Civic Centre, Wanneroo, commencing at 6.00pm where members of the public may, by appointment, present deputations relating to items on the current agenda. To present a deputation members of the public are required to submit a request for deputation in writing at least three clear business days prior to the meeting addressed to the Chief Executive Officer.  A request for a deputation must be received by Council Support by 12 noon on the Friday before the Council Meeting.

·             Deputation requests must relate to items on the current agenda.

·             A deputation is not to exceed 3 persons in number and only those persons may address the meeting.

·             Members of a deputation are collectively to have a maximum of 10 minutes to address the meeting, unless an extension of time is granted by the Council.

 

Please ensure mobile phones are switched off before entering the Council Chamber.

For further information please contact Council Support on 9405 5027.


Recording of Council Meetings Policy

 

 

Objective

 

·        To ensure that there is a process in place to outline access to the recorded proceedings of Council.

 

·        To emphasise that the reason for recording of Council Meetings is to ensure the accuracy of Council Minutes and that any reproduction is for the sole purpose of Council business.

 

Statement

 

Recording of Proceedings

 

(1)     Proceedings for meetings of the Council, Electors, and Public Question Time during Council Briefing Sessions shall be recorded by the City on sound recording equipment, except in the case of meetings of the Council where the Council closes the meeting to the public. 

 

(2)     Notwithstanding subclause (1), proceedings of a meeting of the Council which is closed to the public shall be recorded where the Council resolves to do so.

 

(3)     No member of the public is to use any electronic, visual or vocal recording device or instrument to record the proceedings of the Council or a committee without the written permission of the Council.

 

Access to Recordings

 

(4)     Members of the public may purchase a copy of recorded proceedings or alternatively listen to recorded proceedings with the supervision of a City Officer.  Costs of providing recorded proceedings to members of the public will be the cost of the recording plus staff time to make the copy of the proceedings. The cost of supervised listening to recorded proceedings will be the cost of the staff time. The cost of staff time will be set in the City's schedule of fees and charges each year.

 

(5)     Elected Members may request a recording of the Council proceedings at no charge.  However, no transcript will be produced without the approval of the Chief Executive Officer.  All Elected Members are to be notified when recordings are requested by individual Members.

 

Retention of Recordings

 

(6)     Recordings pertaining to the proceedings of Council Meetings shall be retained in accordance with the State Records Act 2000.

 

Disclosure of Policy

 

(7)     This policy shall be printed within the agenda of all Council, Special Council, Electors and Special Electors meetings to advise the public that the proceedings of the meeting are recorded.


 

 

Notice is given that the next Ordinary Council Meeting will be held at the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, Dundebar Road, Wanneroo on Tuesday 6 February 2018 commencing at 7.00pm.

 

 

 

 

 

D Simms

Chief Executive Officer

1 February, 2018

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Item  1______ Attendances_ 1

Item  2______ Apologies and Leave of Absence_ 1

Item  3______ Public Question Time_ 1

Item  4______ Confirmation of Minutes_ 1

OC01-02/18     Minutes of Ordinary Council Meeting held on 5 December 2017  1

Item  5______ Announcements by the Mayor without Discussion_ 1

Item  6______ Questions from Elected Members_ 1

Item  7______ Petitions_ 1

New Petitions Received  1

Update on Petitions  1

UP01-02/18      Objection to Location of Telecommunications Tower, 23 Beonaddy Road, Eglinton (PT01-12/17) 1

Item  8______ Reports_ 2

Planning and Sustainability  2

City Growth  2

PS01-02/18      Response to Motion on Notice MN01-07/16 - Infill Opportunities for Properties Located Outside of Housing Precincts  2

PS02-02/18      State Planning Policy 4.1 Industrial Interface Released for Public Comment - Submission  8

Approval Services  37

PS03-02/18      Consideration of Development Application for 4 Karimba Street, Wanneroo - Five Multiple Dwellings  37

PS04-02/18      Proposed Amendment No. 161 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 - Ashby Neighbourhood Centre  56

PS05-02/18      Support to Amendment No.144 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 - Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo  68

PS06-02/18      Proposed Home Business - Category 3 (Dog Training Activity) and retrospective approval of front and internal fences and light poles  75

Assets  92

Asset Operations & Services  92

AS01-02/18      Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive Intersection Grade Separation Project - Impact on local roads including Cheriton Drive  92

AS02-02/18      Marmion Avenue / Neerabup Road Intersection - Black Spot project review   104

AS03-02/18      Main Roads WA Amendments to the Road Classification Process  110

Community & Place  124

Community Facilities  124

CP01-02/18      Grant to Upgrade Floodlighting at Abbeville Park  124

Community Safety & Emergency Management Report  131

CP02-02/18      Terms of Reference - Bush Fire Advisory Committee  131

CP03-02/18      Voluntary Surrender of Dogs and Cats Proposed Amendment to Fees and Charges  136

CP04-02/18      Establishment of Two Rocks State Emergency Services (SES) 140

Community Services  143

CP05-02/18      Youth Strategy 2017/18 - 2020/21  143

Corporate Strategy & Performance  167

Business & Finance  167

CS01-02/18      Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 30 November 2017  167

CS02-02/18      Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 31 December 2017  192

Transactional Finance  217

CS03-02/18      Warrant of Payments for the Period to 30 November 2017  217

CS04-02/18      Warrant of Payments for the Period to 31 December 2017  281

Council & Corporate Support  349

CS05-02/18      Donations to be Considered by Council - February 2018  349

Chief Executive Office  356

Governance & Legal  356

CE01-02/18      Decisions under Delegation during 2017-2018 Council Recess Period  356

CE02-02/18      Amendment to Delegation 7.10 Bush Fires Act 1954 - Prosecutions  391

CE03-02/18      Local Government Act 1995 Review   394

Item  9______ Motions on Notice_ 405

MN01-02/18     Mayor Tracey Roberts – Provision of Aquatic Facilities in the North Coast Ward  405

MN02-02/18     Cr Linda Aitken – Provision of Animal Beach at Catalina South  409

Item  10____ Urgent Business_ 412

Item  11____ Confidential_ 412

CR01-02/18     Eden Beach Cafe - Jindalee - Proposed Development and Lease  412

Item  12____ Date of Next Meeting_ 412

Item  13____ Closure_ 412

 


Agenda

 

Good evening Councillors, staff, ladies and gentlemen, we wish to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land we are meeting on, the Whadjuk people.  We would like to pay respect to the Elders of the Nyoongar nation, past and present, who have walked and cared for the land and we acknowledge and respect their continuing culture and the contributions made to the life of this city and this region and I invite you to bow your head in prayer:

 

Lord, We ask for your blessing upon our City, our community and our Council.  Guide us in our decision making to act fairly, without fear or favour and with compassion, integrity and honesty.  May we show true leadership, be inclusive of all, and guide the City of Wanneroo to a prosperous future that all may share.  We ask this in your name. Amen

Item  1     Attendances

Item  2     Apologies and Leave of Absence

Item  3     Public Question Time

Item  4     Confirmation of Minutes

OC01-02/18      Minutes of Ordinary Council Meeting held on 5 December 2017

That the minutes of Ordinary Council Meeting held on 5 December 2017 be confirmed subject to the following:-

 

CS03-12/17 Attachment 1 - Annual Report 2016/17.  On page 7, fourth bullet point from the bottom, delete the word “completion”.  On page 105 after “The following community facilities were constructed” add the words “or under construction” and delete the last bullet point  “Yanchep Surf Life Saving club building” under “The following sports facilities and community centres were upgraded”.

Item  5     Announcements by the Mayor without Discussion

Item  6     Questions from Elected Members

Item  7     Petitions

New Petitions Received

Update on Petitions  

Cr Sangalli presented a petition of 25 signatures objecting to the proposal to locate a telecommunications tower at 23 Beonaddy Road, Eglinton. (Trim 17/413569)

 

Update

 

The application for Telecommunication Infrastructure was withdrawn on the 23 November 2017.

 

Item  8     Reports

Declarations of Interest by Elected Members, including the nature and extent of the interest. Declaration of Interest forms to be completed and handed to the Chief Executive Officer.

Planning and Sustainability

City Growth

PS01-02/18      Response to Motion on Notice MN01-07/16 - Infill Opportunities for Properties Located Outside of Housing Precincts

File Ref:                                               3516 – 17/411593

Responsible Officer:                            Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil       

 

Issue

To consider how properties located just outside the housing precincts identified in Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation (LPP 3.1) may be able to be supported for infill development.

Background

At its Ordinary Meeting held on 19 July 2016, Council considered Motion on Notice MN01‑07/16 and resolved as follows:

 

“That Council REQUESTS Administration to undertake an investigation into how properties located just outside the Housing Precincts identified in Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation may be able to be supported for infill development.”

 

Administration has now completed the investigation requested by Council. This report provides an overview of the options available to allow infill development of properties located outside of the split coded R20/40 and R20/60 areas. For the purposes of this report, the Housing precincts have been referred to as “split coded areas” to reflect the R-Code densities applied by District Planning Scheme No.2 (DPS 2).

Detail

The following options have been identified by Administration.

 

Option 1: Infill development using the R20 density.

 

Properties located outside of the split coded areas could develop where permitted to do so under their existing density code of R20. In order to subdivide or develop two or more dwellings on a lot, the following site criteria are applied by the Residential Design Codes (R‑Codes):

 

·    Minimum lot size of 350m² per dwelling;

·    Average lot size of 450m² per dwelling;

·    Minimum lot area of 450m² for a “battleaxe” lot; and

·    Minimum lot frontage of 10m.

 

Using the above criteria, a property could develop at the current R20 density under the following conditions:

 

·    There is a minimum land area of 900m² (to allow for two dwellings);

·    There is sufficient room at the rear of the existing house to accommodate a second dwelling, unless the existing dwelling is to be demolished;

·    If the existing house is located at the front of the lot, side access of 3-4m in width is available to service a rear battleaxe lot; and

·    If the existing house is removed, a minimum lot frontage of 20m is available to allow for two dwellings/lots to be provided “side-by-side”.

 

A review of lot sizes immediately surrounding the existing split coded areas has identified the predominant lot size is generally less than 800m². Consequently, there is unlikely to be many properties that can meet the R20 requirements for infill.

 

In conclusion, development under the existing R20 density is unlikely to be practicable for the majority of properties located outside of the split coded areas due to insufficient lot size.

 

Option 2: Potential variations to R20 site requirements

 

Further to Option 1, properties coded R20 could subdivide or develop through application of a variation rule available under the R-Codes and WAPC Operational Policy DC 2.2: Residential Subdivision (DC 2.2).

 

Notwithstanding the R20 minimum and average lot area requirements of 350m² and 450m² respectively, the Residential Design Codes (R-Codes) allows for a reduction of up to 5% in certain situations. The situations which may apply in the areas immediately surrounding the split coded areas are:

 

·    Lots with frontage to more than one road (mainly corner lots); or

·    To overcome a special or unusual limitation on the land, such as an irregular lot shape.

 

In order to meet the above variation rule, qualifying lots would require a minimum area of 855m² and prove that the resultant new lots can be developed in accordance with the design requirements of the R-Codes.

 

Whilst the variation rule may allow for a small number of corner lots to develop a second dwelling or lot, the prevailing lot size in the areas surrounding the split coded areas remains lower than the 855m² required. This option is unlikely to provide significant infill opportunity.

 

Option 3: Applying for infill subdivision or development without complying with the R20 density

 

Applications for development of an R20 property to a higher density code could be lodged with a request for agencies to consider applications for development or subdivision on the grounds that a lot is “close” to a higher-density area, and consequently should enjoy the same development rights.

 

Section 3.2 of DC 2.2 requires subdivisions to comply with the minimum and average lot sizes prescribed by the R-Codes. Given this, any subdivision application proposing lot sizes that are less than what is permissible for the R20 density will be refused by the WAPC. Similarly, the City would refuse an application for the development of a second dwelling on the property, as approval would be contrary to clause 4.4.3 of DPS 2 which requires residential development to conform to the provisions of the R-Codes.

 

There is no precedent for a property abutting or located in close proximity to a higher density area being able to enjoy this higher density due to proximity. This stance is reinforced by clause 4.4.4 of DPS 2 that states the density applicable to any residential land within the City shall be determined by reference to the Residential Density Code Maps. There is no ability for the City or the WAPC to exercise discretion and assume a higher density than what is provided for by DPS 2.

 

Option 4: Spot recoding of properties to apply a higher density

 

Properties wishing to benefit from a higher density could be recoded on an individual basis, or alternatively, in small groups. This is referred to as a “spot density recoding”. The process required to recode a lot is identical to rezoning land. A scheme amendment would need to be prepared to change the R-code over the property or properties affected. The amendment report would need to outline the planning justification for the increase in density.

 

Spot recoding proposals are unlikely to meet the principle of “orderly and proper planning and the preservation of the amenity of that locality”, which is an underlying principle of the Planning and Development Act 2005. This is due to a spot recoding relating to a single property or a small group of properties only, rather than dealing with a larger “locality”, where the impacts of the recoding can be more readily coordinated with surrounding development in an “orderly” way. Consequently, it would be difficult to justify the proposal on the planning grounds established when the existing split coded areas were established.

 

LPP 3.1 does not support spot recodings. Rather, it requires the creation of a new housing precinct through an amendment to the Policy where an area is not subject to an approved structure plan. Where an area is within an approved structure plan, the Policy allows for recoding by amending the structure plan rather than creation of a housing precinct. However, in both situations, the recoding is required to meet the criteria used previously for the establishment of densities.

 

The criterion for identifying the boundaries for the future split coded areas was originally identified in the City’s 2005 Local Housing Strategy. The criterion used at the time was to identify areas within a 400m and 800m radius of the centre point of neighbourhood and town (activity) centres. The properties located wholly within the 400m radius would have a higher density (R60) than the R40 density to be applied to properties located within the 400m-800m radius.

 

Amendment No. 119 to DPS 2 created the split coded areas in Girrawheen, Koondoola and Wanneroo. During its preparation, the above criterion was modified at the direction of the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage (DPLH). Rather than being based upon simple circular radii from an activity centre, DPLH required the boundaries to be based on a “walkable catchment” from activity centres and public transport routes. The criterion employed identified all properties within a 400m or 5 minute walk as suitable for R20/60 density. Properties located a 400m-800m or 10 minute walk were identified as suitable for the R20/40 density. Properties that were located on the edge of the 800m walkable catchment, but were not completely within it were also included, notwithstanding a portion of the property was outside of the 800m limit.

 

The methodology required by DPLH for the City’s split coded areas has been used by other local governments to support higher residential densities. The Cities of Joondalup, Canning, Gosnells and Swan and the Shire of Kalamunda have employed a similar approach, with minor variations to take into account local context. This widespread adoption, in conjunction with the DPLH requiring its adoption by the City, means that any spot recoding of land outside of the above parameters will be unlikely to succeed.

 

In conclusion, spot recoding of a property, or even a small number of properties, is impracticable due to the level of planning justification required. In addition to the high level of risk of refusal, a scheme amendment process is likely to have a minimum 12-18 month processing time, which further reduces the practicality of this option.

 

Option 5: Outward shift of split coded area boundaries

 

The boundary of an existing split coded area could be shifted outwards to include properties “just outside” of the initial area. Amending the boundaries to include properties outside of the walkable catchments used to determine the initial boundaries will be subject to the same process, considerations and complications discussed for Option 4. Consequently, this option is not considered feasible as it is unlikely to meet the requirements of the WAPC. Further, an outwards adjustment would be inconsistent with the City’s Local Housing Strategy and LPP 3.1, both of which contain selection criteria based on widely accepted and sound planning principles.

 

Option 6: Creation of new housing precincts / split coded areas

 

New housing precincts (and subsequent split coded areas) could be created in newer suburbs, in particular those immediately adjoining the existing dual-coded areas. Given the  options identified above will not provide additional infill development, or are unlikely to be successful, the creation of new housing precincts is considered to be the only feasible option available. Once a new precinct has been identified in the Local Housing Strategy, a scheme amendment would be required to create a new split coded area.

 

When determining the location of the original housing precincts, the City adopted the recommendations of the Local Housing Strategy that areas with higher densities should be in close proximity to:

 

·    Public transport with a priority towards rail nodes and bus interchanges

·    Major arterial routes

·    Retail and employment centres

·    Areas of high amenity including public open space and recreational facilities

·    Educational institutions including primary, secondary and tertiary, and

·    Community facilities including libraries and medical centres

 

Another factor considered by LPP 3.1 when determining the existing split coded areas was the need for redevelopment of existing housing stock, considering the general age and condition of a locality. The existing split coded areas are located in the older parts of the City, where the housing stock is predominantly 35-45 years old. The age of the stock, as well as its relative small size compared to contemporary housing trends makes these areas more responsive to infill development when compared to areas developed in the 1980s and 1990s.

Consultation

Nil

Comment

Administration acknowledges that there will be some properties located just outside the boundary of the split coded areas. It is further acknowledged that a proportion of these properties may request to be included. However, the current split coded areas are based on criteria that are widely used by other local governments, endorsed by the WAPC and considered sound by Administration.

 

During the recoding process for Amendment No. 119 to DPS 2, and in the period since, a number of property owners in Marangaroo and Alexander Heights have requested the City include their properties in the split coded areas. Whilst portions of these suburbs were included in the split coded areas for Girrawheen and Koondoola, this was due to the properties falling within the walkable catchments of activity centres located south of Marangaroo Drive. The primary focus of the City’s infill target is the revitalisation and consolidation of areas developed in the 1970s. Whilst relatively small parts of Marangaroo and Alexander Heights were included, these areas were first developed in the 1985-1995 period and are unlikely to see significant infill in the short to medium term.

 

There are no site-specific options available to allow an individual property located outside of the split coded areas to develop. The only feasible option available to Council in response to the Motion on Notice is to create new housing precincts through an amendment to LPP 3.1 and subsequently amending DPS 2 to recode the areas identified. These new precincts would need to use the same “walkable catchment” criterion used previously, but focus on new activity centres and public transport routes.

 

Administration does not support the identification of new housing precincts at this time. This position is based on the following:

 

·    Recoding of areas already identified in LPP 3.1 (Quinns Rocks, Yanchep and Two Rocks) are yet to be completed. These areas are considered by LPP 3.1 to be of higher priority than any new areas, due to the age and condition of the housing stock within them;

·    More time is needed to monitor the take up of infill development in the existing split coded areas. This will also provide the opportunity to identify any issues and challenges with facilitating good planning outcomes that the City needs to consider for any future areas. In particular, the City is closely monitoring the built form outcome and its impact on the amenity and character of the locality, as well as the environmental performance of an infill neighbourhood; and

·    A review of the objectives and aims of the 2005 Local Housing Strategy to take into account the current planning and urban growth environment should occur prior to any additional housing precincts being identified. This is currently proposed to take place during Years 2-4 of the City’s Corporate Business Plan 2017/18-2020/21.

 

A review of the 2005 Local Housing Strategy provides the best opportunity to consider whether new infill areas are required. Further, a review will allow for the methodology used for identifying existing and new areas to be refined to ensure better urban outcomes as infill areas are redeveloped.

 

It is therefore recommended that Council does not take any action to include additional properties into the existing split-coded areas until a review of the Local Housing Strategy has been completed.

Statutory Compliance

Any change to the split coded areas will require amendment to Council’s DPS 2 as discussed above.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Built)

3.6    Housing Choice

3.6.1 Facilitate housing diversity to reflect changing community needs

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Any new split coded areas not currently identified in LPP 3.1 will require an amendment to this Policy to include new housing precincts prior to amendment of DPS 2.

Financial Implications

A review of the 2005 Local Housing Strategy is identified in the Corporate Business Plan 2017/18-2020/21 as occurring during Years 2-4 (i.e. 2018/19-2020/21).  Funds for this project will be listed for consideration as part of the 2018/19 budget process.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.      NOTES the outcomes of Administration’s investigations into how properties located just outside split-coded areas may be able to be considered for infill development; and

2.      DOES NOT SUPPORT any further action to include additional properties into existing split coded areas until a full review of the 2005 Local Housing Strategy is undertaken, including a review of the methodology used to identify infill development areas.

 

 

 

Attachments: Nil


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                  8

 

PS02-02/18      State Planning Policy 4.1 Industrial Interface Released for Public Comment - Submission

File Ref:                                               2897 – 18/1393

Responsible Officer:                            Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4         

 

Issue

To consider Draft State Planning Policy 4.1 Industrial Interface (SPP 4.1) and provide comments back to the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC). 

Background

SPP 4.1 has been released for public comment by the WAPC. SPP 4.1 proposes changes to the previous State Planning Policy 4.1: State Industrial Buffer. The submission period closes on Wednesday 21 February 2018. 

 

SPP 4.1 guides planning decisions with the aim of protecting the long-term future operation of industry and infrastructure facilities, by avoiding encroachment from sensitive land uses and potential land use conflicts.

 

Ensuring industrial activity is not constrained by inappropriate land use change has been a long term focus of the state planning system.  The draft policy released for comment is therefore a further refinement of previous policy. 

Detail

The intent of SPP 4.1 is “to protect industry and infrastructure facilities from the encroachment of incompatible land uses and ensure that planning decisions consider the locational constraints of these land uses, the significant investments they represent and their current and future benefits and costs to the community when considering the most appropriate land uses for the surrounding land. The policy also seeks to prevent land use conflicts between industry/infrastructure facilities and sensitive land uses.” (Ref: SPP 4.1, page 1).


SPP 4.1 (Attachment 1) provides background to the revised policy, a statement of the policy objectives, the policy measures, and advice on implementation. There are also definitions of various terms used in the text, and guidelines that include plan graphics to indicate examples of how the policy measures might be applied in spatial planning terms.

 

Key changes to the former policy that are proposed include:

 

·    Change of name to reflect the broader policy measures that extend beyond the application of statutory buffers;

·    Clarification that the policy now applies more broadly to planning for industrial zones and infrastructure reserves;

·    New policy measures for planning for transitional zones in local schemes to address incompatibility between industry and sensitive land uses; and

·    A new implementation section that outlines recommended planning approaches at each stage of the planning framework.

 

At a more technical level the changes that have been made to the current policy (1997) document include the following (Ref: FAQs, WAPC website):

·    Strategic industrial areas (e.g. Kwinana) and infrastructure facilities (ports, wastewater treatment plants and power plants) of State significance that require buffers for protection, which are to be implemented through special control areas in local planning schemes [note: only Kwinana Industrial Area is classified in the Policy as a strategic industrial area. There are none in CoW];

·    General industry land and sensitive land uses managed through land use transition and control;

·    Planning decisions not solely reliant on scientific/technical studies and investigations and to consider strategic factors such as future industrial expansion;

·    Adoption of the precautionary principle where a proponent is unable to demonstrate a proposal will not cause adverse impacts to sensitive land uses;

·    Reference to interface requirements for high-pressure gas pipelines in order to strengthen  policy application for related proposals;

·    Greater clarity for policy implementation including guidelines that illustrate how special control areas can be applied and/or how a transitioning of compatible land use/zones can be applied.

 

With respect to reference to managing ‘through land use transition and control’ (second dot point), SPP 4.1 states the following:

 

·    6.4 (d) Where an industrial zone has been identified to transition to a sensitive zone, local planning strategies should identify any existing industrial land uses with offsite impacts in the area and provide a framework for managing the transition over time to avoid land use conflict between existing industries and new sensitive land uses; and

·    6.4 (e) Where an area has been identified to transition to an industrial zone, local planning strategies should identify any existing sensitive land uses in the area and provide a framework for managing the transition over time to avoid land use conflict between existing sensitive land uses and new industrial land users.”

 

There are a number of listed exemptions to the policy, being proposals as follows:

 

·    rural land uses, including land zoned Industry – Primary Production, or Rural

·    the extraction of basic raw materials

·    infrastructure corridors such as road and rail

·    telecommunications infrastructure

·    aircraft noise

 

The provisions of SPP 4.1 will also not apply retrospectively to address land use conflicts where an existing sensitive land use is impacted by the operation of an industry and/or infrastructure facility.

 

It should be noted that a range of existing regulations and guidelines under a variety of legislation (e.g. health, mining, environmental protection) all continue to apply, and hence strongly support the intent of SPP 4.1. A good example is Part V of the Environmental Protection Act that controls and disallows emissions (e.g. gaseous, contaminants/particulates, odour, noise) from any Prescribed Premises, as listed in Schedule 1 of the Environmental Protection Regulations (1987).

 

A summary sheet of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) concerning the draft policy is provided in Attachment 2.

 

The proposed new policy measures will be relevant to the future planning of the various new industrial areas (and their surrounds) in the City, as well as for new proposals for industry in existing industrial zoned areas, and as illustrated in Attachment 3:

 

·    South Pinjar industrial area (subject to confirmation of this area in the final North West Sub-regional Structure Plan and rezoning under the Metropolitan Region Scheme); and

·    Two smaller industrial areas designated under the Yanchep – Two Rocks District Structure Plan.

 

SPP 4.1 will be relevant to the ‘Industrial Investigation’ areas and their surrounds as designated in the Nowergup, Pinjar and Carabooda areas (ref: North-West Sub-regional Planning Framework, WAPC, 2015) if these are confirmed through future regional planning for those areas. 

 

The draft SPP 4.1 may also be relevant to one portion of land adjacent to the Neerabup Industrial Area (NIA), as indicated in Attachment 3. This figure indicates that a small portion of the Carramar Special Rural (SR) subdivision adjacent to Flynn Drive on the southern side of NIA may involve consideration under the provisions of SPP 4.1 in the future. Although unlikely at this time, pressure may arise in future for further subdivision of existing lots and a resultant shift move toward urban densities. This would be an increased level of ‘sensitive land use’. Although adjacent land areas within NIA are both light/service industry and general industry, given the likelihood of redevelopment for other industrial activities progressively over time, this would be a further complicating factor that would require consideration of the provisions of SPP 4.1, to the effect that legitimate industrial activities within NIA would expect to be protected. However, it is to be noted that the majority of the NIA has an intact and functionally effective interface and therefore appears to be compliant with SPP 4.1.

 

SUMMARY IMPLICATIONS FOR THE CITY

 

In summary, a review of draft SPP 4.1 at this stage, and as shown in Attachment 3, suggests the implications of the policy for the City are comparatively limited, with the possible exception of the South Pinjar Industrial Expansion (IE) area. In this case there are extensive areas adjacent to the nominated IE area that would involve consideration of the requirements of SPP 4.1.

 

Apart from general compliance with the various provisions of SPP 4.1 the key implications for the City upon finalization of the policy appear to be:

·    No action needed where an existing industry or infrastructure is operating within an appropriate zone (i.e. Industry) or where a specified exemption is involved (see Section 3.2 in Attachment 1);

·    No action needed where there are no ‘sensitive land uses’ in proximity (i.e. within a potential area of impact) to an industrial activity or industry zone, or major infrastructure (as defined by SPP 4.1);

·    In the case of undeveloped land within an industrial zone, apply the provisions of SPP 4.1 as appropriate to any proposal for an industrial development on that land, where an interface with a sensitive land use occurs;

·    In the case of undeveloped land abutting or adjacent to an industry zone where there is an existing industrial premise, apply the provisions of SPP 4.1 as appropriate for any proposal that constitutes a ‘sensitive land use’, the exemptions in SPP 4.1 Section 3.2 notwithstanding; and

·    In the case of vacant land within an Industry zone that abuts vacant land adjacent to the Industry zone, apply the provisions of SPP 4.1 in determining the optimum industrial interface outcome that minimises interference with the operation of an industrial activity, avoids impacts on adjacent land use, and avoids encroachment by any ‘sensitive land use’ within the interface area.

Consultation

There has been no external consultation undertaken on draft SPP 4.1 by Administration.

Comment

The new Draft SPP 4.1 is a refinement on the previous policy. It is comprehensive and gives further guidance and clarity to a difficult area of land use planning.

 

Nevertheless, a review identifies the following points that could be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Land and Heritage (DPLH) in a submission (see also Attachment 4).

 

1.   The policy intent focuses on protection of industry from encroachment by other (i.e. sensitive) land uses. However, the opposite is often also true, with industry encroaching towards existing land uses that the policy would identify as ‘incompatible’. The policy should recognise and address this.

2.   There does not appear to be sufficient emphasis on the implications of cumulative impacts of industry, which can be an issue where environmental studies for a single proposal (e.g. concrete batching plant or cement works) can fail to take into account the combined emissions arising from several nearby similar operations (e.g. other concrete batching plants or cement works), either existing or subsequently also developed within a permissible zone. The policy needs to address the need for scientific reports to address more than the negative impacts of a single industrial or infrastructure proposal, where cumulative impacts are likely to be a concern.

3.   The emphasis on obtaining scientific guidance to determining risk and extent of off-site impacts is supported, however the policy should recognize and address the fact that scientific advisory agencies (e.g. Department of Health) are often unable to provide such advice, or are reticent to do so, particularly if the science involved is difficult, costly and requires substantial time and research effort.

4.   Experience suggests that establishing a permanent (or long term) compatible interface with an industrial area can be very difficult owing to the dynamic nature of land use change. The policy could provide more advice on adaptive change over time.

5.   The proposed notification on title (pursuant to relevant legislation) of prospective purchasers that they are purchasing land in a designated buffer is supported.

6.   The intent of the policy that Local Planning Policies prepared by local government should be consistent with SPP 4.1 is supported. 

7.   The policy should emphasize that the spatial configuration of a buffer needs to be realistic with respect to the nature of emissions (i.e. gaseous/odour, particulates, dust, noise) and how different types of emissions are transported and disperse over distance (i.e. wind direction, topography, vegetation cover, etc.) – and to avoid buffer boundary alignments being based primarily on the convenience of existing cadastral boundaries.

8.   The policy does not appear to recognise the importance of visual aspects, including visibility, amenity impacts and screening as important aspects of buffer designation.

Statutory Compliance

Council is able to make a submission on the draft SPP 4.1 pursuant to Section 28 of the Act, and sub-section 28(5) of the Act requires the WAPC to consider such submissions.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Natural)

3.2    Enhanced Environment

3.2.2 Collaborate with relevant State agencies with a focus on the enhancement of the natural environment

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Draft SPP 4.1 states that local government may prepare local planning policies to supplement or elaborate on measures associated with the implementation of SPP 4.1, but at this stage Administration sees no need to take such action.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council ENDORSES the submission on the draft State Planning Policy 4.1 Industrial Interface, included in Attachment 4 of this report, and note the key elements contained in the submission, as follows:-

1.      The policy should recognise and address the need to focus on the protection of existing land uses from encroachment by industry, as much as protection of industry from encroachment by other (i.e. sensitive) land uses;

2.      There does not appear to be sufficient emphasis on the implications of cumulative impacts of industry;

3.      The emphasis on obtaining scientific guidance to determining risk and extent of off-site impacts is supported, but the policy should recognize that it is often not possible to obtain such advice;

4.      The policy could provide more advice on adaptive change of land use within buffer areas over time;

5.      The proposed notification on title (pursuant to relevant legislation) of prospective purchasers that they are purchasing land in a designated buffer is supported;

6.      The intent of the policy that Local Planning Policies prepared by local government should be consistent with SPP 4.1 is supported;

7.      The policy should emphasize that the spatial configuration of the buffer needs to be realistic with respect to the nature of emissions and the variable distances required, and to avoid buffer boundary alignments being based primarily or solely on the convenience of existing cadastral boundaries; and


 

8.      The policy does not appear to recognise the importance of visual aspects, including visibility, amenity impacts and screening as important aspects of buffer designation.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

SPP_4.1_Industrial_Interface.pdf

18/12105

 

2.

ATTACHMENT 2_FAQ_SPP4_1_Industrial_Interface.pdf

18/12114

 

3.

Attachment 3 NWSR Planning Framework Plan.pdf

18/12112

 

4.

State Planning Policy 4.1 submission

18/12128

Minuted

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                14

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                28

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                37

 

Approval Services

PS03-02/18      Consideration of Development Application for 4 Karimba Street, Wanneroo - Five Multiple Dwellings

File Ref:                                               DA2017/1121 – 17/390086

Responsible Officer:                            Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider a development application (DA2017/1121) for five Multiple Dwellings at 4 Karimba Street, Wanneroo (subject site).

 

Applicant

M Singh

Owner

M Singh & N Havard

Location

Lot 107 (#4) Karimba Street, Wanneroo

Site Area

774m2

DPS 2 Zoning

Residential – R20/R60

Background

On 6 September 2017 the City received a development application for five Multiple Dwellings at the subject site. A location plan of the subject site is included in Attachment 1.

Detail

The development application proposes five Multiple Dwellings which is a ‘D’ Discretionary land use within the Residential zone under DPS 2. The application incorporates the following:

 

·    2 two bedroom dwellings and 3 three bedroom dwellings;

·    11 resident car parking bays; and

·    2 visitor car parking bays. 

 

Upon assessment of the development application it was determined that the proposal incorporates the following variations to the deemed-to-comply provisions of the R-Codes:

·    A plot ratio of 0.71 in lieu of 0.7 as required by Clause 6.1.1 – C1 and Table 4 of the R-Codes;

·    Open space of 34% in lieu of the 45% as required by Clause 6.1.5 and Table 4 of the R-Codes; and

·    Three variations to the lot boundary setbacks of Clause 6.1.4 of the R-Codes in the following ways:

Eastern setback to the Carport being 1m in lieu of the 1.5m;

Eastern setback to the upper floor being 1.8m in lieu of the 2.1m requirement; and

Western setback to the upper floor being 2.5m in lieu of the 3.3m requirement.

 

On 1 December 2017, the applicant provided a revised set of plans to address some of the above issues. Upon assessment it was determined that the revised plans now met the deemed to comply provisions of the R-Codes for plot ratio, open space and carport setback to the eastern boundary. The other setback variations (being eastern upper floor and western upper floor) remain and are discussed in the Comment section below. Plans depicting the amended proposal are included in Attachment 2.

Consultation

In accordance with Clause 2.5.4 of the City’s Local Planning Policy 4.20: Split Coded Areas, where a proposal comprises Multiple Dwellings, the proposal shall be advertised to surrounding landowners in accordance with Clause 64 of the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2.

 

Advertising of the proposal was undertaken by the City in writing to the affected landowners adjoining the subject site including 22 & 24 Civic Drive, 6 Karimba Street and 9 Maradu Crescent Wanneroo. Advertising was undertaken for a period of 21 days commencing 6 October 2017 and closing 27 October 2017. Two submissions objecting to the proposal were received from the occupier and landowner of 6 Karimba Street, Wanneroo.

 

Both submissions raised the following concerns:

·    The number of units proposed on the lot will be too many;

·    The number of parking bays abutting 6 Karimba Street will have an impact of the traffic generation on the abutting property; and

·    The development will overshadow the adjoining property and potentially solar panels.

 

A summary of the submissions and Administration’s response is included in Attachment 3.

Comment

Assessment against Clause 4.5.4 of DPS 2

 

The subject site has a split residential density code of R20/R60 under DPS 2. Clause 4.5.4 of DPS 2 details that where a lot has a split density code under DPS 2, development shall conform to the lower density code applicable to the lot unless able to meet the requirements of Clause 4.5.4 (a) and (b) as follows:

 

(a)  Sufficient capacity exists in all necessary public utility services to adequately meet the needs of the development; and

(b)  The development has one consolidated vehicle access point with reciprocal access rights to serve all dwellings, and restricted vehicle access to other areas of road frontage.

 

The proposed development meets the requirements of Clause 4.5.4 of DPS 2 as follows:

 

(a)  The applicant has provided written confirmation from the Water Corporation to confirm that the existing infrastructure is capable of accommodating the proposed development. Confirmation has also been received from Western Power which relates to the split coded areas generally, stating that Western Power can accommodate the increase in demand for power expected as a result of the future development within the split coded areas; and

(b)  The development proposes one consolidated shared vehicular access point to accommodate the five Multiple Dwellings.

 

As a result of the above, the proposal meets the requirements of Clause 4.5.4 of DPS 2 and the development has been assessed according to the higher density code of R60.

 

Lot Boundary Setbacks

 

In accordance with Part 2 of the R-Codes, if a proposal does not meet the 'deemed-to-comply' provisions, the City is to exercise its judgement to consider the merits of the proposal having regard to the relevant 'design principles'.

The Deemed-to-Comply provisions of Clause 6.1.4 of the R-Codes identify buildings should be setback from the boundary at a distance set by the height and length of the wall, as well as the provision of major openings. The proposed application includes two variations being:

·    Eastern setback to the upper floor being 1.8m in lieu of the 2.1m requirement; and

·    Western setback to the upper floor being 2.5m in lieu of the 3.3m requirement.

As the proposal does not meet the Deemed-to-Comply requirements of Clause 6.1.4 of the R-Codes in regard to lot boundary setbacks, it has been assessed against the corresponding Design Principles as detailed in the table below.

Design Principles Clause

6.1.4 P4.1

Administration Comments

Ensures adequate daylight, direct sun and ventilation for buildings and the open space associated with them.

It is considered the proposal meets the relevant design principle for the following reasons:

·    Units 3 and 4 have balconies facing the street (north) while Unit 5 has its balcony facing the car parking. The configuration of these units allow direct sunlight and ventilation into the open space areas as they all abut larger open areas.

·    Unit 1 and 2, located on the ground floor, have their private open space on the western side meaning the reduced setback would not impact the provision of daylight & direct sun. The setback of 2.5m is still sufficient to allow for adequate ventilation to the development.

 

On this basis, the side setbacks to the east and west boundary will not impact the provision of daylight, direct sun or ventilation to the buildings and proposed open space.

Moderate the visual impact of building bulk on a neighbouring property.

The proposal contains variations on the east and west of the development. In both instances the walls are articulated through the use of openings and varying wall heights together with landscaping which will help reduce excess visual building bulk. The visual impact of the building is therefore considered to meet the design principle.

Ensure access to daylight and direct sun for adjoining properties.

The proposed setback variations are located on the eastern and western side of the lot. Due to the configuration the building will primarily cast any shadow into the subject site (carpark) and not the adjoining properties.

 

The development complies with the requirements of Clause 6.4.2 of the R-Codes relating to Solar Access, which permits the development to cast a shadow on the adjoining property to a maximum of 25% of the adjoining lot’s site area.  The development will result in 12% overshadowing to the southern lot.

Assist with the protection of privacy between adjoining properties.

The proposed eastern and western walls contain highlight windows and do not incorporate any major openings to habitable rooms. There will be no impact on visual privacy to the adjoining lots as a result of the setbacks proposed.

 

Based on the above, the boundary walls are considered to meet the Design Principles of Clause 6.1.4 of the R-Codes and are supported.

 

Traffic and Parking

Concerns were raised during the advertising period regarding the potential for increased traffic congestion on the surrounding road network as a result of the proposed development.

Karimba Street is considered to be a Neighbourhood Connector B under the Western Australian Planning Commission’s (WAPC) Liveable Neighbourhoods Policy which is constructed to carry an average daily traffic volume of 3,000 vehicle trips per day (VTPD).

The latest recorded traffic count by the City for Karimba Street was 2,822 VTPD which was recorded on 27 February 2017. Based on the Department of Planning’s Transport Data, a dwelling is assumed to generate an average of eight VTPD. As a result of the proposed development, there will be an additional four dwellings which gain vehicle access from Karimba Street (there is already an existing house on the subject site). Based on this data, the development will increase the total number of VTPD on Karimba Street by 32, to be approximately 2,854 VTPD. This is less than the 3,000 vehicles which the road has been constructed to carry. Furthermore, an increase of 32 VTPD on Karimba Street and the surrounding road network will have negligible impact on traffic flow and congestion.

 

At the time that Amendment No. 119 to DPS 2, being the introduction of split coded areas for Girrawheen, Koondoola and Wanneroo, was being prepared and considered, a Traffic Impact Assessment (dated January 2013) was undertaken for the Wanneroo, Girrawheen and Koondoola areas to ensure that the existing roads and infrastructure could accommodate the expected increase in traffic as a result of the expected future development. It was determined that the surrounding road network could safely accommodate the expected increase in traffic as a result of the adoption of Amendment No. 119.

Given the above, the potential increase in VTPD as a result of the proposed development will not generate traffic or create traffic congestion on Karimba Street and the surrounding road network.

Assessment against LPP 4.20

LPP 4.20 was adopted by the City in order to provide guidance on the redevelopment of areas subject to a split density code. An assessment of the proposal against the applicable requirements of LPP 4.20 is shown in the table below.

 

Clause

Requirements

Compliance of Proposed Development

2.5

Multiple Dwelling Development

2.5.1

A maximum of one (1) vehicular crossover per street frontage shall be permitted to provide vehicle access to all dwellings.

Complies.

The proposal includes one consolidated shared vehicular access point to Karimba Street.

2.5.3

Crossovers shall not exceed 6m in width at the lot boundary.

Complies.

The proposed crossover is 6m in width.

2.5.4

Where a proposal comprises Multiple Dwellings, the proposal shall be advertised in accordance with Clause 64 of the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2.

Complies.

The proposal was advertised as detailed in the Consultation section of the report.

4

Street Surveillance

4.1.1

At least one balcony, verandah or major opening to a habitable room must face and have an uninterrupted view of each of the following:

·    Primary street;

·    Pedestrian approach to the dwelling; and

·    Vehicular approach to the dwelling.

Complies.

·    Major openings and a balcony faces the primary street.

·    Major openings and balconies are fronting both the pedestrian and vehicular approach to the dwellings.

5

Landscaping

5.1.1

No more than 50% of the front setback area shall comprise impermeable hardstand including synthetic turf, loose stone, compacted limestone or paving.

Complies.

50% of the front setback area is comprised of hardstand.

5.1.2

The remaining 50% of the front setback area shall comprise soft landscaping defined as turf, planting and/or trees.

Complies.

50% of the front setback area is comprised of soft landscaping including trees and turf.

6

Crossover Design

6.1.1

Proposed new crossovers shall not exceed three metres in width at the lot boundary unless:

a)   The development proposes five or more dwellings on the parent lot.

b)   The development is required to take vehicle access from a district distributor road, in which case;

The crossover width shall not exceed a total width of 6m at the lot boundary, in accordance with the City’s Standard Drawings.

Complies.

The proposed crossover is 6m in width as the development proposes five dwellings on the parent lot.

6.1.3

Approved crossovers shall be setback a maximum of 1.0m from the lot boundary to maximise landscaping and on street parking opportunities except where the development proposes a configuration of dwellings that is serviced by a central access way.

Complies.

The development proposes a configuration of dwellings that is serviced by a central access way.  

 

WAPC’s Design WA and Draft Apartment Design Policy

 

The WAPC has released a Draft Apartment Design Policy as part of the Design WA initiative in order to provide design guidance for apartments and mixed use development. This document was released for public comment and the City has made a submission to the WAPC. This policy is currently in draft form and has not been finalised or formally adopted.

 

An assessment against the relevant provisions contained within Draft Apartment Design Policy has been undertaken by Administration in order to ensure an acceptable design outcome. Administration is of the view that the development does provide an appropriate design outcome as it contributes positively to the streetscape, does not have an adverse impact on the adjoining properties and provides sufficient areas for residents to recreate. A more detailed assessment against the relevant provisions of the Apartment Design Policy is discussed below.

 

Ventilation

 

The Design Criteria of Clause 4.2.2 of the Draft Apartment Design Policy requires all dwellings to be either cross-ventilated (for dual aspect units) or have a maximum depth of 8m (for single aspect units).

 

The development proposes three of the units with a dual aspect which will be naturally cross ventilated. These units are less than 15m in depth which is considered to be the optimum outcome with regard to natural cross ventilation.

 

The development proposes two single aspect units which have a depth of less than 8m. All units are therefore considered to be provided with sufficient natural ventilation in accordance with the Design Criteria of Clause 4.2.3 of the Draft Apartment Design Policy. 

 

Deep Soil Areas

 

Deep soil area is defined within the Draft Apartment Design Policy as soft landscape area on a lot with no impeding building structure or feature above or below, which supports growth of medium to large canopy trees.

 

The Design Criteria of Clause 3.4 of the Draft Apartment Design Policy requires 12% of the site area to be provided as deep soil area with a minimum dimension of 3m. This equates to a total of 89.3m2 of deep soil area which should be provided for the subject site. The development provides a total of approximately 47m2 of the site area dedicated for deep soil landscaping made up of two areas with dimensions of 7.7m x 2.5m and 11m x 2.5m which equates to 6% of the site area.

 

The Design Guidance (comparative to the ‘Design Principles’ of the R-Codes) of Clause 3.4 notes that the deep soil area is intended to ensure that a development includes sufficient areas which can be used for planting of trees which can mature. Although the design criteria relating to deep soil areas has not been satisfied by the proposal, the proposal does incorporate landscaping areas within the site with dimensions ranging from 2m to 8m which can be utilised for the planting of trees which can mature.

 

Additionally, the applicant has provided a landscaping plan with the application which indicates the location of various shrubs and trees to be planted within the site in order to contribute to the amenity of the site and the presentation of the development to the streetscape.   

 

It is further noted that the R-Codes do not specify any requirements for the provision of deep soil areas within a lot. The R-Codes and the City’s LPP 4.20 do however, specify the requirement for 50% of the front setback area to be provided for soft landscaping, which as detailed above has been satisfied.

 

On the basis of the above, it is considered that although the development does not provide the 12% deep soil area as prescribed by the design criteria of Clause 3.4 within the Draft Apartment Design Policy, the landscaped deep soil areas provided can accommodate the planting and growth of mature trees within the site and therefore is considered to satisfy the applicable design guidance requirements. Additionally, the landscaped areas within the front setback will positively contribute to the existing streetscape.

 

Communal Open Space

 

The Design Criteria of Clause 3.5 of the Draft Apartment Design Policy states that for development proposing up to 10 dwellings, there is no requirement for communal open space to be provided on the property. The development is proposing five dwellings, and as such is not required to provide communal open space on the site and complies with Clause 3.5 of the Draft Apartment Design Policy.

 

Conclusion

 

The application for five Multiple Dwellings at 4 Karimba Street, Wanneroo has been assessed against the relevant requirements of the R-Codes and LPP 4.20, with consideration given the WAPC’s Draft Apartment Design Policy. The proposal is considered to generally meet the requirements of the R-Codes, LPP 4.20, and the intent of the relevant provisions within the Draft Apartment Design Policy. 

 

As detailed above, the variations to the Deemed-to-Comply provisions of the R-Codes are considered to meet the relevant Design Principles and are supported. Further, it is considered the proposed development provides a good design outcome as the building and associated landscaping positively contributes to the amenity of the locality.

Administration is of the view that the development is acceptable and therefore, it is recommended that the development application be approved subject to Administration’s recommended conditions.

Statutory Compliance

This application has been assessed in accordance with the R-Codes, LPP 2.4 and LPP 4.20, with consideration given to the WAPC’s Draft Apartment Design Guidelines.

 

The development has largely been found to be compliant with the deemed-to-comply requirements of the R-Codes, LPP 2.4 and LPP 4.20.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Built)

3.6    Housing Choice

3.6.1 Facilitate housing diversity to reflect changing community needs

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

The application has been assessed against the provisions of the relevant Local and State Planning Policies.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.   Pursuant to Clause 68(2)(b) of the Deemed Provisions of District Planning Scheme No. 2 APPROVES the Development Application for Five Multiple Dwellings at Lot 40 (4) Karimba Street, Wanneroo as shown in Attachment 2, subject to the following conditions:

a)      Parking areas, driveways, crossovers and points of ingress and egress shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the Australian Standard for Offstreet Carparking (AS2890) as amended and the City of Wanneroo Technical Standards, and shall be drained, sealed and marked;

b)      The parking areas and associated access indicated on the approved plans shall not be used for the purpose of storage or obstructed in any way at any time, without the prior approval of the City;

c)      Stormwater and any other water run-off from buildings or paved areas shall be collected and retained on-site;

d)      The applicant shall undertake adequate measures to minimise any impacts of dust and sand drift from the site;

e)      Residents and visitor car parking spaces shall be marked and clearly signposted as dedicated for residents and visitor use only respectively, to the satisfaction of the City;

f)       Lighting shall be installed in all car-parking areas, driveways and pedestrian pathways prior to the development first being occupied; and

g)      Planting and landscaping shall be carried out in accordance with the plans as submitted prior to the occupation of the development and thereafter maintained to the satisfaction of the City.

2.   ENDORSES Administration’s responses to the submissions as provided in Attachment 3; and

3.   ADVISES the submitters of its decision.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Location Plan - 4 Karimba Street, Wanneroo

17/429819

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Proposed Plans - DA2017/1121 - 4 Karimba Street, Wanneroo

17/419299

Minuted

3.

Attachment 3 - Schedule of Submissions following Advertising - Multiple ~ 4 Karimba Street WANNEROO

18/19721

Minuted

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                45

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                53

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                                56

PS04-02/18      Proposed Amendment No. 161 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 - Ashby Neighbourhood Centre

File Ref:                                               30471 – 17/403020

Responsible Officer:                            Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4         

 

Issue

To consider a request to amend the City’s District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2) by rezoning the Ashby Neighbourhood Centre (ANC) from Urban Development to Commercial, and including Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse as additional uses for the centre.

 

Applicant

Planning Solutions

Owner

Endeavour Properties Pty Ltd

Location

Ashby Neighbourhood Centre, which is composed of:

Lot 9632 (6) Hollosy Way, Ashby

Lot 5 (2) Hollosy Way, Ashby

Lot 8 (131) Pinjar Road, Ashby

Lot 3 (141K) Pinjar Road, Ashby

Site Area

34 278m2

MRS Zoning

Urban

DPS 2 Zoning

Urban Development

ASP 3 Zoning

Centre

ASP 77 Zoning

Commercial

Background

On 4 July 2017, Planning Solutions, on behalf of the landowner, submitted to the City Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2.

 

Currently, the ANC is zoned Urban Development under DPS 2, which requires a structure plan to be approved for the area before subdivision and development is carried out.

 

East Wanneroo Cell 1 (Tapping and Ashby) Approved Structure Plan No. 3 (ASP 3), which encompasses the ANC site and surrounding area, zones the ANC as Centre. The Centre zone requires a further centre structure plan to be approved for the area before subdivision and development is carried out.

 

ASP 77 was subsequently prepared and submitted to the City, which zones the ANC as Commercial and sets out specific development criteria such as retail floor space, vehicle access, building setbacks and streetscape requirements. The ASP 77 area also includes the adjoining road reserves (excluding Pinjar Road). ASP 77 was adopted by the Western Australia Planning Commission (WAPC) on 2 August 2011. A copy of the ASP 77 structure plan map is included as Attachment 1.

 

On 27 March 2012, the Metro North-West Joint Development Assessment Panel (JDAP) approved an application (DA2011/1208) for the whole ASP 77 area. This approval included the existing Tavern and Service Station, as well as Take-Away Food Outlets adjacent to the Pinjar Road boundary, and Offices and a Medical Centre adjacent to the Hollosy Way boundary. A number of subsequent applications have since been approved for the ANC, modifying the land uses and built form approved under DA2011/1208.

 

On 19 December 2017, the WAPC approved Amendment No. 26 to ASP 3, subject to modifications. This amendment rezoned Lot 9631 (14) Blackberry Drive, Ashby (to the north of the ANC) from Residential to Mixed Use, with the intention of accommodating a Medical Centre on the site.

Detail

Site

A location plan showing the ANC is included as Attachment 2. The ANC is bounded by Blackberry Drive and vacant Residential-zoned land to the north, Fomiatti Street to the west, Hollosy Way to the south and Pinjar Road to the east.

Proposal

The proposal seeks to amend DPS 2 by:

 

1.      Rezoning the ANC from Urban Development to Commercial;

 

2.      Modifying Schedule 2 – Section 1 (Additional Uses) to include Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse as discretionary ‘D’ uses within the ANC;

 

3.      Modifying Schedule 3 (Centre and Commercial Zones) to include a retail net lettable area (NLA) for the ANC of 7100m2, which is currently included under ASP 77; and

 

4.      Modifying the DPS 2 map accordingly.

 

The applicant’s justification for the proposal can be summarised as follows:

 

1.      The proposed additional land uses (Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse) will allow for a broader range of uses within the ANC, and will help optimise the centre’s performance;

 

2.      The Motor Vehicle Repairs land use is intended to facilitate minor mechanical and tyre repairs to motor vehicles; and

 

3.      The Warehouse land use is intended to facilitate small scale self-storage services for local residents and businesses.

 

Attachment 3 contains the amendment plan showing the existing zoning and proposed DPS 2 amendment zoning.

Consultation

In accordance with Regulation 47(2) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Scheme) Regulations 2015, a standard amendment to a local planning scheme must be subject to public consultation.

 

The amendment is also required to be referred to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to assess the environmental impacts of the proposal and to determine whether any formal environmental assessment is necessary.

 

The amendment must be advertised for public comment for a period of 42 days.  Advertising is required to occur in the following manner, consistent with the requirements of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Scheme) Regulations 2015:

 

 

·        Advertisement in a local newspaper for one week;

·        Display notice of the proposal in Council offices;

·        Referral in writing to affected persons/agencies.

·        Display on the City’s website;

·        Placement of a sign on affected sites, giving notice of the proposal; and

·        Any other way the local government considers appropriate.

 

Notwithstanding the above, Administration does not support the proposed amendment, as will be discussed in the Comment section below. If Council agrees with Administration’s recommendation to not adopt the amendment, then it will not require advertising.

Comment

Additional Land Uses

 

The proposal seeks to include Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse as additional uses within the ANC. Under DPS 2, these uses are non-permitted ‘X’ uses within the Commercial zone. The definitions of these land uses, as per DPS 2, are as follows:

 

Motor Vehicle Repairs: “means any land or buildings used for or in connection with electrical and mechanical repairs and overhauls to motor vehicles. The term includes repairs to tyres but does not include recapping or retreading of tyres, panel beating, spray painting or chassis reshaping”

 

Warehouse: “means premises used for storage of goods and may include the carrying out of commercial transactions involving the sale of such goods by wholesale.”

 

Applicant’s Justification

 

The applicant has provided the following justification for the proposed additional land uses:

 

·    The built form outcomes of future Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse uses can be controlled through a future LDP or through conditions under Schedule 2 – Section 1 (Additional Uses), to ensure that these uses do not detract from active frontages along the main streets of the ANC.

 

·      The additional uses can be restricted to specific locations within the ANC. On 16 October 2017, the JDAP approved a development application for seven commercial tenancies on Lot 9632 (6) Hollosy Way, Ashby (DA2017/759; see Attachment 4 for the approved plan). The Motor Vehicle Repairs is intended to be contained within the unit closest to the existing Service Station. The Warehouse is intended to be accommodated within the northern portion of Lot 9632 (6) Hollosy Way, Ashby (shown as proposed Lot 1 in Attachment 4). No indication has been given in relation to the size of the intended Warehouse in this location.

 

·    The Warehouse use is intended to accommodate self-storage units for domestic purposes. The closest self-storage business is in Tapping (Drovers Self-Storage) approximately 2.7 kilometres north-west of the site. Locating an appropriately scaled self-storage facility within the ANC provides a convenient service for local residents and businesses. The self-storage facility envisaged for the site would be of a scale which services a local catchment and will provide storage capacity for higher density residential development envisaged for the locality, such as the 68 Multiple Dwellings which have been approved at 21 Blackberry Drive, Ashby, which abuts the northern boundary of the ANC.

 

·    The Motor Vehicle Repairs use is intended to accommodate a facility for minor mechanical and tyre repair (such as an Auto Masters or Ian Diffen type business). A major component of the intended minor mechanical and tyre repair would be the display and sale of tyres and related accessories, which would be consistent with the Showroom use, a permitted ‘P’ use within the Commercial zone. The remaining repair component of the intended use would be consistent with the ‘tyre repairs or minor mechanical repairs to motor vehicles’ which is included in the Service Station use, a discretionary ‘D’ use within the Commercial zone. A Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises, which allows for incidental servicing of sale/hire vehicles, is also a discretionary ‘D’ use within the Commercial zone.

 

·    Locating a Motor Vehicle Repairs in the vicinity of the surrounding residential area would allow local residents to drop off their car and walk home, rather than driving to an industrial area. Similar services (Kmart Tyre and Auto) have been provided within Commercially-zoned areas in the Wanneroo Town Centre and Clarkson Secondary Centre (Ocean Keys Shopping Centre).

 

·    The inclusion of a Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse within the ANC will ensure the ultimate development of the centre and will widen the range of employment opportunities and services available for surrounding residents.  

 

Administration’s Comments

 

Notwithstanding the above justification provided by the applicant, Administration considers that the proposed additional uses are inappropriate within the ANC for the following reasons:

 

·    State Planning Policy 4.2 Activity Centres for Perth and Peel (SPP 4.2) outlines the typical functions, characteristics and performance targets for each level of the activity centre hierarchy. In regards to neighbourhood centres, such as the ANC, SPP 4.2 outlines the following:

 

Main role/function

Provide for daily and weekly household shopping needs, community facilities and a small range of other convenience services.

Typical retail types

Supermarkets, personal services and convenience shops

Typical office development

Local professional services

 

One of the objectives of the City’s Local Planning Policy 3.2 Activity Centres (LPP 3.2) is to encourage activity centres to fulfil their role within the SPP 4.2 hierarchy, such as that outlined above for neighbourhood centres.

     

      Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse are considered to fall outside of the typical functions and characteristics of a neighbourhood centre, as they do not offer retailing, personal services or professional (office) services to the local catchment. As such, they are not considered appropriate land uses to be located within the ANC, even if they were to be restricted to specific locations within the centre.

 

·    SPP 4.2 encourages the inclusion of diverse, active land uses within activity centres as a means of activating the public realm and creating a sense of vibrancy. Whilst the inclusion of the proposed additional uses within the ANC would increase the centre’s possible land use diversity, Administration does not consider that a Motor Vehicle Repairs or Warehouse would contribute to the vibrancy of the centre in the same way that other uses which are permitted in the Commercial zone may contribute to vibrancy (such as a Hairdresser, Restaurant or Shop).

 

·    Neerabup is approximately 10km away from the ANC and has land zoned both Service and General Industrial, within which both Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse are either permitted ‘P’ or discretionary ‘D’ land uses. The Service and General Industrial zones of Wangara are also a similar distance from the ANC. As such, Administration considers that there is already sufficient land within the proximity of the ANC which is capable of supporting the proposed additional uses.

 

·    As indicated in the applicant’s justification, a Service Station and Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises are discretionary ‘D’ uses in the Commercial zone. Additionally, the applicant has referred to a Showroom being a permitted ‘P’ use within the Commercial zone. Notwithstanding that portions of a Motor Vehicle Repair may be considered to fall under different land use classifications which are capable of approval within the centre, a Motor Vehicle Repair is a separate land use under DPS 2, and must therefore be considered on its own merit.

 

Further to the above, Administration notes the following in relation to the Service Station, Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises and Showroom uses.

 

Under DPS 2, Service Station is defined as follows:

 

premises used for the retail sale of petroleum products and minor vehicle accessories and goods of an incidental/convenience retail nature, and for carrying out greasing, tyre repairs or minor mechanical repairs to motor vehicles, but does not include a transport depot, panel beating, spray painting, major repairs or wrecking.”

 

Under DPS 2, Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises is defined as follows:

 

“means any land or buildings used for the display, sale or hire of new or second-hand vehicles, motorcycles, boats or caravans, or any one of more of them, together with ancillary uses such as the servicing of such goods or the sale of spare parts.”

 

Whilst a Motor Vehicle Repairs allows for “electrical and mechanical repairs and overhauls to motor vehicles”, a Service Station only allows for “minor mechanical repairs to motor vehicles”. Similarly, a Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises only allows for vehicle servicing as an “ancillary” use to the predominant use, being vehicle sale and hire. As indicated by these definitions, a Motor Vehicle Repairs is capable of operating at a greater scale and level of intensity compared to that of a Service Station or Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises. 

 

The ANC is surrounded by residential-zoned land to the north and south, and residential development is already present on the southern side of Hollosy Way (see Attachment 1). Whilst the scale and activities associated with a Service Station or Vehicle Sales/Hire Premises may be appropriate in the proximity of residential land uses, a Motor Vehicle Repairs has the potential for greater impact and noise generation.

 

Motor Vehicle Repairs is currently only capable of being approved within the Service and General Industrial zones of the City. These zones accommodate uses which are less sensitive to the noise generation associated with a Motor Vehicle Repairs.

 

In relation to the permissibility of a Showroom within the Commercial zone, the sale of motor vehicle parts (such as tyres) would generally be considered incidental to a Motor Vehicles Repair use, and would therefore not require a separate development approval. As such, the permissibility of a Showroom within the Commercial zone is not considered sufficient justification for including Motor Vehicle Repair as an additional use within the ANC.

 

·    It is noted that the existing Kmart Tyre and Auto operations in the Wanneroo Town Centre and Ocean Keys Shopping Centre, which were referenced in the applicant’s justification, have not been granted development approval for Motor Vehicle Repairs. The City will investigate any unauthorised uses being carried on within these centres. Given that these uses do not have the appropriate development approval, their presence within the abovementioned Commercially-zoned areas is not considered to be appropriate justification for the inclusion of Motor Vehicle Repairs as an additional land use within the ANC.

 

·    On 19 December 2017, the WAPC approved Amendment No. 26 to ASP 3, subject to modifications. This amendment rezoned Lot 9631 (14) Blackberry Drive, Ashby (to the north of the ANC) from Residential to Mixed Use, with the intension of accommodating a Medical Centre on the site. As part of the justification for the amendment, the applicant contended that by locating the Medical Centre just outside of the ANC, additional retail uses could be provided within the centre. It is noted that the proposed additional uses are not considered retail land uses.

Normalisation of ASP 77

 

The proposal also seeks to normalise ASP 77. ‘Normalising’ in this context means amending DPS 2 so that the Commercial zoning of the land prescribed in ASP 77 becomes the zoning under DPS 2. This process is required for the consideration of additional uses within the ANC, as the existing zoning under DPS 2 is Urban Development, which is not included in the zoning table of DPS 2 (and therefore could not have additional uses).

 

In accordance with Deemed Provision 28 (1) of DPS 2, if ASP 77 were to be normalised into DPS 2, then ASAP 77 would no longer have any effect. However, the additional provisions under ASP 77, such as retail floor space, access, building setbacks and streetscape requirements, would need to be dealt with through alternate mechanisms. A number of provisions in ASP 77 would become redundant if the ANC is rezoned from Urban Development to Commercial under DPS 2. Other provisions of ASP 77 are already covered by other legislation, have already been satisfied, or can be included in the relevant parts of DPS 2. The remaining built form and access provisions of ASP 77 may be incorporated into a Local Development Plan (LDP).

 

In accordance with Clause 27(1) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015, a decision maker for a development or subdivision application is to have due regard to, but is not bound by, the relevant structure plan when deciding the application. In light of this status of structure plans, Administration is supportive of the proposal to normalise the zoning under ASP 77 into DPS 2, where the objectives and land use permissibility for the ANC will have a higher degree of force and effect. The design elements in ASP 77, which are proposed to be incorporated into an LDP, will have the same force and effect as they currently do under ASP 77. Therefore, this approach is also supported by Administration.

 

In addition to the normalisation of ASP 77, ASP 3 would also need to be amended to remove the Centre zoning from the ANC, and to include a notation to refer to DPS 2. Should Council be supportive of the proposed amendment, this amendment to ASP 3 can be included as a resolution in the report to the WAPC.

 

Conclusion

 

Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2 seeks to include Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse as additional land uses within the ANC. As discussed above, Administration does not support the inclusion of these additional land uses, as they are considered to be inconsistent with the intent of a neighbourhood centre, as outlined in SPP 4.2, and they are not considered to contribute to the activation and vibrancy of the ANC. Administration considers that these uses are more appropriate within the Service and General Industrial zones of the City, within which they are currently capable of approval.

 

Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2 also seeks to normalise the zoning of the ASP 77 area in DPS 2. Given that this process is intended to facilitate the inclusion of the abovementioned additional uses, and Administration does not support the proposed additional uses, it is recommended that the proposed amendment as a whole is not supported.

Statutory Compliance

As per Regulation 34 the amendment is considered to be Complex because it relates to development that is of a scale, or will have an impact, that is significant relative to development in the locality.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “2     Economy

2.1    Local Jobs

2.1.1 Develop strong economic hubs locally and near transport

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

This proposal has been assessed in accordance with the following policies:

 

·    State Planning Policy 4.2 Activity Centres for Perth and Peel; and

·    Local Planning Policy 3.2 Activity Centres

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.         Pursuant to Section 75 of Planning and Development Act 2005 REFUSES TO ADOPT Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2, to rezone the Ashby Neighbourhood Centre from Urban Development to Commercial, modify Schedule 3 (Centre and Commercial Zones) to include a retail NLA for the Ashby Neighbourhood Centre of 7100m2, and to include Motor Vehicle Repairs and Warehouse as additional uses for the following reasons:

 

a)      The proposed additional uses are considered to be inconsistent with the role and function of a neighbourhood centre, as outlined in SPP 4.2; and

 

 

b)      The proposed additional uses are not considered to contribute to the vibrancy of the Ashby Neighbourhood Centre, which is set out as a consideration in SPP 4.2.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2 - Existing ASP 77 Structure Plan Map

18/29984

 

2.

Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2 - Location Plan

17/420147

 

3.

Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2 - Existing and Proposed Zoning Map

17/421567

 

4.

Amendment No. 161 to DPS 2 - Intended Locations for Proposed Additional Uses

18/30811

 

 

 

 

 


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PS05-02/18      Support to Amendment No.144 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 - Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo

File Ref:                                               20123 – 17/429902

Responsible Officer:                            Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider support of Amendment No. 144 to the City’s District Planning Scheme No. 2 (DPS 2) to zone part of Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo (326m2) from ‘Local Scheme Reserve – Parks and Recreation’ to ‘Civic and Cultural’ zone.

 

Applicant

City of Wanneroo

Owner

Crown Land - City of Wanneroo Management

Location

Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo

Site Area

6.86 hectares

MRS Zoning

Urban

DPS 2 Zoning

Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

Background

 

The City of Wanneroo (the City) submitted the proposed amendment as a standard amendment in accordance with the Planning and Development (Local Planning Scheme) Regulations 2015 (The Regulations). This amendment seeks to amend the DPS 2 map as follows:

 

a)    To zone a part of Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo (Crown Reserve 39479 – John Moloney Park) 326 m2 in area, from 'Local Scheme Reserve – Parks and Recreation' to 'Civic and Cultural' zone.

 

The lots subject to this amendment – being Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo (Crown Reserve 39479 – John Moloney Park) and Lot 825 (46) Highclere Boulevard, Marangarooare located as indicated on the plan included as Attachment 1. Both lots are zoned ‘Urban’ under the Metropolitan Region Scheme (MRS).

 

The City owns Lot 825 in freehold, which is currently zoned 'Civic and Cultural' under DPS 2. Lot 825 contains a building known as the Marangaroo Family Centre (MFC) which is currently leased out to the Department of Local Government and Communities.

Council at its meeting of 22 August 2017 considered the proposed rezoning of portion of Lot 10776 and resolved as follows (PS07-08/17):

“That Council:-

 

1.      Pursuant to Section 75 of the Planning and Development Act 2005 PREPARES Amendment No. 144 to City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2, to undertake the amendments to the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 as prescribed in the document included as Attachment 3;

 

2.      Pursuant to Regulation 35 (2) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015, RESOLVES that Amendment No. 144 of the District Planning Scheme No. 2 is a standard amendment pursuant to Regulation 34 of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015, for the following reasons:

 

a)   The amendment is consistent with a region planning scheme that applies to the scheme area (Metropolitan Region Scheme);

 

b)   The amendment would have a minimal impact on land in the scheme area that is not the subject of the amendment; and

 

c)   The amendment is not considered to align with the criteria applicable for ‘basic’ and ‘complex’ amendments, prescribed in the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015.

 

3.      Pursuant to Section 81 of the Planning and Development Act 2005, REFERS Amendment No. 144 of the District Planning Scheme No. 2 to the Environmental Protection Authority; and

4.      Subject to no objections being received from the Environmental Protection Authority and pursuant to Regulation 47(1) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015, NOTIFIES the Western Australian Planning Commission of its intention to advertise Amendment No. 144 and ADVERTISES Amendment No. 144 for public comment for a period of not less than 42 days, pursuant to Regulation 47(2) and 47(4) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes).”

Detail

The amendment proposes to zone a portion of Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo (326m2) from Local Scheme Reserve – Parks and Recreation to Civic and Cultural (the extent of which is included in Attachment 2) and amending the scheme map accordingly.

 

The MFC lessees utilise ancillary facilities encroaching into the portion of Crown Reserve subject to this Amendment, including a playground and shed. These facilities are used exclusively by the lessees of the MFC, and are surrounded by a chain mesh fence that prevents public access from the remainder of the Crown Reserve.

 

The City is seeking to excise the subject portion of Crown Reserve 39479 and amalgamate this and into Lot 825 so that the ancillary facilities are situated on the same land parcel as the MFC building. The purpose of the excision of the Crown Reserve is so that all the MFC facilities are contained on one Freehold lot, owned by the City. To consolidate the zoning in support of that land acquisition, this Amendment proposes to apply a 'Civic and Cultural' zoning on the portion of Crown Reserve subject to the excision.

 

Attachment 3 contains a plan showing how the DPS 2 map would be modified as a result of this amendment. 

Consultation

In accordance with Council’s resolution above, the amendment was referred to the EPA for comment. No objection was received from the EPA. Amendment No. 144 was advertised for a period of 42 days for public comment in accordance with Regulations. Public advertising was carried out between 10 October 2017 and 21 November 2017 which is consistent with the requirements of 47 (2) to (4) of the Regulations. The advertising was by way of the following;

 

·    Advertisement in a local newspaper,

·    Installation of one sign on Lot 825 – directed toward Highclere Boulevard,

·    Display notice of the proposal in Council offices and on the City’s website, and

·    Referral in writing to affected persons/agencies.

 

During the submission period, the City received three submissions, all raising no objection to the proposal. These submissions were from government agencies and servicing authorities, namely, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions - Parks and Wildlife Service, Water Corporation and ATCO Gas Australia.

Comment

Regarding the public open space provision in the locality of Marangaroo the following matters are noted.

 

Council at the meeting of 22 August 2017 while considering the amendment proposal was advised that should the subject portion of John Moloney Park be zoned ‘Civic and Cultural’ and amalgamated into the adjoining Lot 825, there will be an insignificant change of public open space remaining in the locality (PS07-08/17).

 

It was also noted that the portion of John Moloney Park subject to this DPS 2 amendment contained facilities that were fenced off from public access and only available for the use of the occupants of the MFC. The remaining portion of John Moloney Park contains facilities such as a playground, a carpark, a baseball/softball field, cricket pitch and cricket nets which will continue to be available to the public should the amendment be approved.

 

Considering the above, Administration recommends that the Amendment No.144 to DPS2 should be supported.

 

Conclusion

 

The City has submitted the proposed Amendment No. 144 to DPS2 to zone a part of Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo (326 m2 in area), from 'Local Scheme Reserve – Parks and Recreation' to 'Civic and Cultural' zone.

 

Considering the matters noted above in regard to the amendment proposal, it is recommended that the DPS 2 amendment proposal be supported.

Statutory Compliance

Amendment No. 144 to DPS 2 has been processed in accordance with the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015. In accordance with Regulation 50(3), Council is required to consider the submissions received and must resolve to either support or not support the amendment. Administration recommends that Council supports the amendment without modification.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Built)

3.4    Activated Places

3.4.2 Provide safe spaces, centres and facilities through our infrastructure management and designs for community benefit and recreation

 

 

 

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.      Pursuant to Section 50(3)(a) of Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 SUPPORTS Amendment No. 144 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 WITHOUT MODIFICATION to rezone a portion of Lot 10776 (34) Highclere Boulevard, Marangaroo from Local Scheme Reserve – Parks and Recreation to Civic and Cultural;

 

2.      AUTHORISES the Mayor and Chief Executive Officer to SIGN and SEAL Amendment No. 144 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 documents in accordance with the City’s Execution of Documents Policy; and

 

3.      FORWARDS the amendment documentation to the Western Australian Planning Commission for its consideration REQUESTING that the Honourable Minister for Planning grant final approval to the Amendment;

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Location Plan for Amendment No. 144 to DPS 2 - Advertised

17/241318

 

2.

Attachment 2 - Extent of Proposed Excision (Advertised Plan) for Amendment  No.144 to DPS2

17/241573

 

3.

Attachment 3 - Amendment Map - Amendment No. 144 to DPS 2 - Advertised

17/241314

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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PS06-02/18      Proposed Home Business - Category 3 (Dog Training Activity) and retrospective approval of front and internal fences and light poles

File Ref:                                               DA2017/1038 – 17/393170

Responsible Officer:                            Director Planning and Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       6         

 

Issue

To consider a development application for:

 

·    Home Business - Category 3 (Dog Training Activity); and 

·    Retrospective approval of the front and internal fences and three light poles.

 

Applicant

MGA Town Planners

Owner

J M Kenny & E R Shadbolt

Location

32 Pennygum Place, Mariginiup

Site Area

1.1059 hectare

DPS 2 Zoning

Special Rural Zone

Background

In January 2017, the City received complaints from the residents of Pennygum Place, Mariginiup about a dog training activity taking place at 32 Pennygum Place (the subject site). Following an investigation by the City’s compliance officers over a period of time, on 9 August 2017, the applicant submitted a development application to commence development of Home Business - Category 3 (Dog Training Activity). The owner has advised that he has ceased operation of this business while the application is being processed and determined.

In addition, the owner, without approval from the City, had constructed a solid limestone front fence, internal colorbond fences and erected three light poles each 6.4 metres (m) in height. The applicant has also requested retrospective approval of these works.

Detail

Site

 

Attachments 1 & 2 contain the location plan and an aerial photograph respectively of the subject site. A dwelling and five sheds, which have been approved by the City, are located on the site. The backyard of the subject site, which the applicant has been using to train the dogs, is turfed and generally devoid of any vegetation.

 

Proposal

 

Attachment 3 is the site plan indicating 100m2 of dog training area, 1.8 to 2.1-metre high internal colorbond fences, 1.8-metre high solid front limestone fence, dog housing and three light poles.

 

Dog Training Activity

 

It is proposed to train a maximum of five dogs including the owner’s two dogs for a period of four days from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Therefore every four days there would be up to three new dogs at the site. As the training will be occurring every day of the week, the applicant has requested approval to conduct training seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

 

The extent of the proposed training area is 100m2 and is located about 17 metres from the southern boundary of the subject site.

 

It is proposed to board all dogs in a shed that has been modified to house dogs. Attachment 4 is the photo of the dog housing existing on the site.

 

Two light poles are fixed to a rear shed and the third one to the dwelling as shown on Attachment 3. The light poles are 6.4m in height. The shed is located approximately 72m from the southern boundary and 10m from the northern and eastern boundaries of the subject site. The dwelling is located approximately 60m from the eastern boundary and 40m from the southern boundary of the subject site. The lights on the shed and dwelling are focused in the southerly and easterly direction respectively to light the backyard of the subject site. The light on each pole has 400 watts of power. The applicant has advised that the lights are required mainly for security reasons.

Consultation

Public consultation was undertaken for a period of 21 days from 3 to 24 November 2017 by way of writing to the adjoining and affected residents and placing a notice on the City’s website. At the conclusion of the comment period, 10 submissions were received. Nine objected to the proposal and one supported the proposal. Attachment 5 is a summary of submissions received and Administration’s responses and recommendations.

 

The main issues raised in the submissions objecting to the proposal are as follows:

 

·        The applicant intends to undertake ‘Internationale Prufungs-Ordung’ (IPO) training of the dogs;

 

·        The brightness of the lights from the light poles spills directly into the adjoining property and blinds motorists on Pennygum Place negotiating the bend just before the subject site; and

 

·        Barking of dogs on the subject site.

 

A detailed discussion of these main issues is provided in the Comment section.

Comment

Zoning

 

The subject land is zoned Special Rural in the District Planning Scheme No.2 (DPS 2) and is identified as Special Rural Zone No. 13 in Schedule 10 of DPS 2 which contains the special provisions. One of the special provisions is that the land may be used only for residential purposes. The applicant provided legal advice stating that the use of the subject land for a Home Business - Category 3 would not conflict with the subject site being used for residential purposes. This is because the land zoned Special Rural in DPS 2 can accommodate more than one land use namely Single House, Bed and Breakfast and Home Business all for the same residential purpose. The City’s Legal section concurs with this advice. On this basis, the development application has been assessed.

 

Home Business – Category 3 (Dog Training Activity)

 

Dog training Activity is not a use class listed in DPS 2.  The proposal, however, can be  considered as Home Business – Category 3.  An assessment against the criteria applicable to Home Business - Category 3 is provided below:

 

·          Does not cause injury to or prejudicially affect the amenity of the neighbourhood.

 

In regard to amenity it is noted that the applicant proposes to conduct dog training from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week. The applicant has advised that when under the supervision of a handler it will be ensured that barking of dogs will be stopped if it occurs. Therefore training of dogs during the appointed time is not likely affect the amenity of the neighbourhood.

 

·          Entails employment of maximum of two persons.

 

It is not proposed to employ anyone as the resident of the subject site will be training the dogs.

 

·          Will not result in traffic difficulties.

 

It is proposed to train five dogs for four days including two dogs belonging to the applicant. It is intended that all five dogs will be boarding on site. Dropping of three external dogs on ‘a’ day and picking them on the fourth day after training is not likely to create traffic difficulties on Pennygum Place.  The use will generate six vehicle trips each time dogs are dropped off or collected.

 

·          Not to occupy an area more than 50m2 but Council may approve, subject to community consultation, an area up to 100m2 or one third of the floor area of the dwelling whichever is the lesser.

 

The dwelling area is approximately 300m2. The proponent intends to utilise 100m2 of the backyard as shown on Attachment 3 for dog training purposes.  In addition, the applicant is proposing to use the approved shed (Attachment 6 is a copy of the approved plan) as dog housing for the boarding of all five dogs.  The proposed dog housing shed is 126m2. Therefore in total it is proposed to occupy an area of 226m2 which far exceeds the maximum 100m2 permitted under the provisions of DPS 2.  To ensure compliance with this criteria Administration is recommending the 100m2 dog training area is supported, however, the boarding of dogs on site is not supported.  Therefore it is recommended to impose to condition to the effect that the external dogs shall not remain on the subject site before 9 a.m. or after 6 p.m. seven days a week

 

The applicant does not propose to fence off the 100m2 training area. By not physically defining the training area on the ground, the area used for dog training may differ time to time. To ensure that the training area is confined to that shown on the application, it is recommended that a condition be imposed requiring the applicant to fence off the training area with a 1.0 metre high open style fence to the City’s satisfaction.

 

Submittors’ concerns

 

Nature of dog training

 

The submitters are of the view that the proponent is undertaking Internationale Prufungs-Ordung (IPO) training of dogs, which includes training dogs in police work.  The applicant has advised that it is not intended to undertake IPO training of the dogs. The following information is provided on the proposed training activities.

 

1.         Teaching dogs basic obedience skills such as "sit", "down", "stay" and "recall";

 

2.         Behavioural modification to stop undesirable behaviours which could include pulling on the lead, jumping up onto people and not coming back when called;

 

3.         Tracking training using scent trails; and

 

4.         Everyday lifestyle training including teaching dogs general manners.

 

Light spillage

 

Some submitters have advised that there is spillage of light from the light poles onto their properties.

 

Light spill under clause 13 of Schedule 3.1 of the Local Government Act 2005 states as follows:

 

“Take specific measures to prevent —

                   

(a)        Artificial light being emitted from the land; or

           

(b)         Natural or artificial light being reflected from something on the land,

     

creating a nuisance.”

 

The Local Government Act does not provide the methodology to measure the light spill. However, the City utilises a Lux Meter to measure the amount of light projected onto a neighbouring property.

 

On 25 July 2017, the City’s compliance officers took light readings at 7:30 p.m. and based on the above standard, recorded that there was no spillage of light on the adjoining properties.

 

Blinding lights

 

This issue was discussed with one of the submitters whose residence is located at the northern end of Pennygum Place, which is a cul-de-sac. There is a bend in the road just before the subject site. The submitter advised that while negotiating this bend, the occupants of the car are blinded by the light.

 

There are three lights on the subject site one attached to the rear of the dwelling and the other two to a shed as indicated in Attachment 3. It is understood from the submitter that the lights on the shed could be affecting their vision. The bend in Pennygum Place is located about 140 metres from the lights on the shed. The light reading taken by the City’s compliance officers recorded that there was no spillage on the adjoining properties about 70 metres away.  The bend on Pennygum Place being 140 metres from the lights, it is not likely that the lights could blind the passing motorists.

 

Barking of the dogs

 

The applicant has advised that during the training of the dogs, barking will be immediately stopped if it occurs.

 

Retrospective approvals.

 

Front fence

 

Under the provisions of the City’s Fencing Local Law 2016 on a Special Rural lot a sufficient fence is a front fence that is less than 1.0 metre in height or is constructed and maintained as an open fence and does not exceed 1.8 metres in height. The local law does not specify the permissible material of the front fence. Open fence is defined as a fence,

 

·      That has continuous vertical gaps with a minimum gap width of 50mm with the area of gaps being not less than one third of the area of the fence face; and

 

·      The lower part of which may be closed up to a height of 1.0 metre above the natural ground level immediately in front of the fence but, where the natural ground level slopes the height of  the closed portion is to be no more than 1.0 metre from the base of the fence.

 

The 1.8-metre high solid limestone front fence does not comply with the provisions of the Fencing Local Law and is generally not in keeping with other fencing in the locality.

 

It is therefore recommended the applicant be required to modify the fence to comply with the Fencing Local Law to the satisfaction of the City within six months from the date of any approval of the development application.

 

Internal fences

 

The internal colour bond fences are not noticeable from the road (Pennygum Place). The 2.1-metre high fence marked red in Attachment 3 tapers down to a height of 1.8 metres at the boundary and front fence. The internal fences do not affect the streetscape. Considering a possible 1.8-metre high open front fence as per the provisions of the Fencing Local Law, it is recommended that the internal fences be retrospectively approved.

 

Light poles

 

The applicant has sought retrospective approval of the three light poles each with 400 watts of power. Considering the matters discussed above in regard to light spillage, it is recommended that these light poles be approved subject to there being no light spillage onto the neighbouring properties.

Statutory Compliance

This application has been assessed in accordance with the City of Wanneroo’s District Planning Scheme No. 2 and the City’s Fencing Local Law 2016.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.1 Create opportunities that encourage community wellbeing and active and healthy lifestyles

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

 

 

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.      Pursuant to Clause 68(2)(b) of the deemed provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 APPROVES the development application submitted by MGA Town Planners on behalf of J M Kenny and E R Shadbolt for the proposed Home Business – Category 3 (Dog Training Activity) at Lot 10 (32) Pennygum Place, Mariginiup, subject to the following conditions:

a)      Permission is granted to the owners of the property 32 Pennygum Place, Mariginiup to conduct a Home Business – Category 3 (Dog Training Activity) at the above address and only whilst the owners permanently reside at the premises;

b)      Hours of dog training activity shall be between 9.00 a.m. and 6.00 p.m. seven days a week;

c)      The external dogs shall not remain on the subject site before 9 a.m. or after 6 p.m. seven days a week; and

 d)     The training area shall be confined to the 100m2 as shown on the approved plan and be fenced off with a 1.0 metre high open style fencing to the satisfaction of the Manager Approval Services.

 

2.      Pursuant to Clause 68(2)(a) of the deemed provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 APPROVES unconditionally the retrospective development application for the 1.8 to 2.1-metre high internal colour bond fences as shown on the approved plans;

3.      Pursuant to Clause 68(2)(a) of the deemed provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 APPROVES the three light poles subject to there being no light spillage onto the neighbouring properties;

4.      REQUIRES the applicant to modify the front fence to comply with the provisions of the City of Wanneroo Fencing Local Law 2016 within six months of the date of this approval to the satisfaction of the Manager Approval Services; and

5.      ADVISES the submitters of this decision.

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - 32

17/394638

 

2.

Attachment 2 - 32

17/400495

 

3.

Attachment 3 - 32

17/398218

 

4.

Attachment 4 - 32

17/426044

 

5.

Attachment 5 - Dog

18/17190

 

6.

Attachment 6 - 32

17/448826

 

 

 


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Assets

Asset Operations & Services

AS01-02/18      Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive Intersection Grade Separation Project - Impact on local roads including Cheriton Drive

File Ref:                                               3120V03 – 18/9132

Responsible Officer:                            Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider the potential impact on the City’s local road network as a result of the Main Roads WA’s (State Government) proposed grade separated intersection at Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive, Wanneroo. Refer to Attachment 1 for a location plan.

Background

The Metropolitan Road Improvement Alliance (MRIA), on behalf of Main Roads WA  (MRWA), has undertaken planning and development for the Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive Grade Separated Intersection project. The project involves a grade separation with Joondalup Drive going over Wanneroo Road with two lanes in each direction.

 

Attachment 2, published by MRWA, provides a full overview of the project and shows the extents of the proposed works. It is noted that Main Roads WA has progressed this project to the Request for Proposals (RFP) stage and the construction is expected to start in mid-2018.

 

In addition, Council at its meeting of 22 August 2017 discussed the Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive grade separation project as part of its consideration for the installation of a roundabout at the intersection of Joondalup Drive and Cheriton Drive, and resolved, in part, to:

 

“1. REQUESTS Administration to analyse the results of MRWA traffic modelling and      present a Report to Council in February 2018;”

Detail

Wanneroo Road is under the care and control of MRWA and is used as an alternate route to the Mitchell Freeway, providing access between Perth CBD, Joondalup and the North West corridor. The objective of the grade separation project is to reduce congestion at the intersection and to provide an improved alternative north-south route to the Mitchell Freeway. It is also anticipated that the grade separation project and the associated proposal under consideration would impact on the function and efficiency of the City’s local road network.

 

In order to assess the potential traffic impacts associated with the proposed Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive grade separation works, MRIA has undertaken a traffic impact assessment and a microsimulation analysis. The microsimulation software analyses a number of intersections together from a holistic perspective; however it should be noted that while a microsimulation analysis provides a broader picture, the accuracy of it reduces significantly with the increase in study area. Therefore, the immediate vicinity of the grade separation project was analysed using microsimulation and the more remote intersections were analysed as standalone intersections. While the traffic impact assessment based on the standalone analysis of intersections has been made available in the Elected Members reading room, MRIA has not yet provided a report on the microsimulation analysis; however, it has provided the City some videos of the simulation which demonstrates the queue length in the analysis area. The traffic impact assessment documents the traffic forecasts at these intersections and outlines the anticipated performance of each intersection using the 2031 forecast traffic volume.

 

The following intersections were analysed using microsimulation:

1.   Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive at grade roundabout;

2.   Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue;

3.   Joondalup Drive/Drovers Place.

 

The following intersections were analysed as standalone intersections.

1.   Joondalup Drive/St Stephens Crescent;

2.   Joondalup Drive/Houghton Drive;

3.   Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive;

4.   Joondalup Drive/Waldburg Drive.

 

These MRIA provided report and the microsimulation videos provide the following information, noting that Administration’s comments and recommendations are made later in the Comments Section of this report:

·    Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive intersection - the at grade roundabout at the intersection of Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive will perform satisfactorily both after construction and in 2031;

 

·    Drovers Place/Joondalup Drive intersection - Drovers Place intersection on Joondalup Drive under current conditions will experience longer queue during the morning peak hour. Different options including current configuration, traffic signals and roundabout were analysed for this intersection, however it is considered that these options will disrupt free flowing movements on Joondalup Drive with longer queue on the overbridge, backing to Joondalup Drive/Burns Beach roundabout leading to increased crash risk. Therefore, left in/left out only with emergency access is considered to be the safest option for this intersection at this stage. The options available at this intersection will be further reviewed during the detailed design phase of the project.

 

·    St Stephens Crescent/Joondalup Drive intersection - it is anticipated that the continuous traffic flow from the Joondalup overbridge will reduce the number of gaps in the traffic, making right turn access at St Stephens Crescent too difficult and potentially dangerous. Furthermore, due to the physical structure of the ramp for the grade separation there will be insufficient space available to accommodate the full movements at the intersection of Joondalup Drive and St Stephens Crescent. As a result, this intersection is proposed to be left in / left out only as part of the grade separation project.

 

·    Houghton Drive/Joondalup Drive intersection - it is considered that the existing traffic signals at the intersection of Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive provide a minimal additional gap benefit at the intersection of Joondalup Drive and Houghton Drive, 640m east of the Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive intersection, that allows additional gaps for Houghton Drive traffic to undertake left out or right out movements.

 

·    Cheriton Drive/Joondalup Drive and Waldburg Drive/Joondalup Drive intersection - the additional gap benefit of the traffic signals diminishes with greater distance. As such, the intersections of Joondalup Drive at Cheriton Drive, 950m east of the Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive intersection and Waldburg Drive, 1.3Km east of the Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive intersection, receive minimal to nil benefit respectively.

The summary of the traffic analysis for each intersection is as follows:

 

Intersection

Analysis Results

Recommendations

by MRIA

2017 with existing configuration

2031 with modified intersection configurations

 

Joondalup Drive/St Stephens Crescent

No Capacity issue was identified

No Capacity issue was identified as a Left In Left Out intersection

Will become a left-in / left-out intersection as part of the grade separation project

Joondalup Drive/ Houghton Drive

Operating satisfactorily

Right turn from Houghton Dr would experience significantly increased delay (121.2 & 1,720s in AM and PM peak) with poor level of service in both morning & afternoon peak

Upgrades are required by 2031 and roundabout treatment has been recommended in future.

 

Joondalup Drive/ Cheriton Drive

Right turn movements from Cheriton Drive are already experiencing poor level of service in the afternoon peak hour

Both morning and afternoon peak would experience significantly increased delay (504.7 & 1937.5s in AM and PM peak)  with poor level of service if current configuration is maintained

MRIA report suggests that upgrading of the intersection is required now due to the poor level of service in the afternoon peak. The Traffic Impact Study also demonstrates that the grade separation project will negatively impact the operation of the intersection in its current configuration. As a result, the following two options were tested:

a) Signal Control

b) Roundabout

Both options will provide a satisfactory level of service at this intersection. MRWA has previously rejected the request for installing traffic signals at this intersection, therefore a roundabout is a feasible option.

Joondalup Drive/ Waldburg Drive

Right turn movements from Waldburg Drive are already experiencing poor level of service in the morning peak hour; however, it is considered to be acceptable at this stage due to the low number of right turn movements

Both morning and afternoon peak times would experience significantly increased delay (697.8 and 259.9s in AM and PM peak)  with poor level of service if current configuration is maintained

Upgrades are required by 2031 and roundabout treatment has been recommended in future.


Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue

No microsimulation model prepared for year 2017.

Model prepared with current give-way layout which shows queue and delay on Clarkson Avenue in the morning peak, afternoon peak seems satisfactory.

No recommendations received from MRIA

Joondalup Drive/Drovers Place

No microsimulation model prepared for year 2017.

Model prepared with left in/left out layout and both peak performing at an acceptable level. Further analysis of this intersection will be undertaken as part of the detail design process.

No recommendations received from MRIA

Consultation

MRIA is leading the consultation process for this project. To date MRIA has undertaken consultation with various stakeholders and the community representative groups; however community feedback suggests that this is not considered sufficient and that the community still has some concerns regarding the project. The Mayor wrote to the Minister for Transport, Planning and Lands on 10 January 2018, requesting additional community engagement.

 

Administration has represented the City in the Community Liaison Group and provided advice at the Technical Working Group, noting that these groups were established for this project by MRWA, after the project was announced by the State Government..

Comment

Having analysed the MRIA impact assessment report and the microsimulation model, Administration’s proposed strategy to minimise safety and efficiency impacts on the local road network are summarised below:

Intersection

Administration Comments

Joondalup Drive/St Stephens Crescent

Administration agrees that left in/left out provides the safest option for this intersection and acknowledged that modifications will be implemented under the grade separation project.

Joondalup Drive/ Cheriton Drive

Administration agrees with MRIA’s recommendation either roundabout or signalisation intersection treatments. According to their analysis both options would perform satisfactorily in 2031, however in some approaches the queue length and delay are higher for signal control than roundabout. MRWA has previously rejected the signals option at this intersection; as such a roundabout is the preferable option.

As this intersection is currently experiencing unsatisfactory level of service and the benefit of additional gaps due to the traffic signals at Wanneroo Road intersection will be removed by the introduction of the grade separation, the roundabout construction at this intersection should be included in the grade separation project.

Joondalup Drive/ Houghton Drive

The recommendation for upgrades to roundabout by 2031 is acknowledged.

Administration considers that the construction of a roundabout at the intersection of Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive will have a positive impact on this intersection. As the intersection is expected to operate satisfactorily up to 2031, the City will monitor the performance of the intersection after the construction of the roundabout at Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive and take action accordingly.

Joondalup Drive/Waldburg Drive

The recommendation for upgrades to roundabout by 2031 is acknowledged.

Administration considers that the construction of a roundabout at the intersection of Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive will have a positive impact on this intersection. As the intersection is expected to operate satisfactorily up to 2031, the City will monitor the performance of the intersection after the construction of the roundabout at Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive and take action accordingly.

Wanneroo Road/ Joondalup Drive at grade roundabout

Administration agrees with MRIA proposal

Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue

Administration does not agree with MRIA. Microsimulation model shows a long queue on Clarkson Avenue under the 2031 forecast traffic with priority layout.

When the Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive intersection is upgraded to a roundabout, southbound traffic flow will be continuous and make access at Clarkson Avenue more difficult and potentially dangerous.

In addition, PTA intends to re-route bus services along Clarkson Avenue in line with their long-term plan for services in the area.

In accordance with Agreed Structure Plan No.80 – Drovers Place Precinct (Attachment 3 refers) Clarkson Avenue and Wanneroo Road intersection proposed to be a four-way signalised intersection in the future. Furthermore, due to the close proximity of the Tapping Primary School, St Stephens School and Drovers Place Precinct, this intersection needs urgent attention for the safe access of students, visitors and local residents.

With the above consideration, installation of traffic signals at this intersection should form part of the grade separation project.

Joondalup Drive/Drovers Place

Agrees with MRIA proposal of a left in left out intersection, noting that further assessment will be undertaken at detail design stage.

 

Conclusion

On balance, as a result of the proposed grade separation project, the potential traffic congestion and safety issues at the intersections along Joondalup Drive are of a great concern to the City. In order to alleviate these concerns, it is proposed that the scope for the grade separation project must be expanded to include the installation of a roundabout at Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive intersection and traffic signals at Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue intersection. This will allow the traffic from the suburbs east of Wanneroo Road to access safely into Joondalup Drive and Wanneroo Road, reducing the potential traffic congestions and crash risks at these intersections.

By incorporating these elements in the scope of works for Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive project, the State Government can demonstrate its commitment to the community and deliver this project and associated works in its entirety as a single package.

It is therefore recommended that in view of the projected impact of the grade separation project on local roads, Administration write to Main Roads WA requesting that both Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive and Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue intersection upgrades be included in the planned grade separation project.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Built)

3.5    Connected and Accessible City

3.5.1 Deliver local transport infrastructure including roads, footpaths and cycle ways to improve accessibility

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S04 Integrated Infrastructure and Utility Planning

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Leadership team

Manage


 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S23 Stakeholder Relationships

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

CEO

Manage

 

The above risks relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s Corporate and Strategic risk registers.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

The recommendations made in this report propose that the intersection upgrade at Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive and Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue be included in Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive grade separation project being delivered by Main Roads WA. Therefore, there are no financial implications for the City in regards to the grade separation project.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.      RECEIVES the updates regarding the Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive grade separation project;

2.      NOTES the traffic impact assessment provided by Metropolitan Road Improvement Alliance, on behalf of Main Roads WA for this project and the projected impact of the grade separation project on local roads;

3.      REQUESTS Administration write to Main Roads WA requesting that both Joondalup Drive/Cheriton Drive and Wanneroo Road/Clarkson Avenue intersection upgrades be included in the planned grade separation project; and

4.      REQUESTS Main Roads WA to hold a community information forum and further engage with the communities of the suburbs adjoining the Wanneroo Road/Joondalup Drive intersection.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Location map - Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive grade separation project

18/15435

 

2.

MRWA Newsletter January 2018  -  Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive Interchange

18/28946

 

3.

Drovers Place Precinct ASP no 80

18/15429

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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AS02-02/18      Marmion Avenue / Neerabup Road Intersection - Black Spot project review

File Ref:                                               3120V03 – 17/439906

Responsible Officer:                            Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To consider the post Freeway opening traffic pattern and associated change in safety risks for the 2017/2018 Black Spot project on Marmion AvenueNeerabup Road/Anchorage Drive (south) roundabout.

Background

The City was successful in receiving $800,000 of Federal Blackspot funding in 2017/2018 to install a left turn slip lane at the Marmion Avenue/Neerabup Road/Anchorage Drive roundabout. The detail of the submission was considered by Council in September 2016, refer Item No AS01-09/16.

 

Marmion Avenue/Neerabup Road/ Anchorage Drive Intersection, Clarkson

Concern

Marmion Avenue and Neerabup Road are both ‘District Distributor A’ Roads in the City’s Functional Road Hierarchy and are constructed as four-lane dual carriageways.  Anchorage Drive is classified as a Local Distributor Road in the City’s Functional Road Hierarchy and is constructed as a 4-lane dual carriageway.  The roundabout in question has two circulating lanes and an internal diameter of 50 m.  Marmion Avenue has a posted speed limit of 80km/h, Neerabup Road has a posted speed limit of 70 km/h and Anchorage Drive has a posted speed limit of 60 km/h.

 

The five year crash data indicates a high number of rear-end crashes.  There have been a total of 154 crashes over five years of which 34 resulted in casualties.

 

This project requires the closure of one circulating lane between Anchorage Drive and Neerabup Road.  Administration has conducted traffic analysis which shows that the roundabout is expected to operate effectively under these conditions.  Additional analysis will be required once the Mitchell Freeway extension is complete to confirm the validity of assumptions made during this modelling.

 

Treatment

Install left turn slip lane from Marmion Avenue southbound to Neerabup Road.  This will reduce rear end crashes by reducing exposure on this leg of the roundabout. The project cost was estimated at $800,000 with a BCR of 2.11 and applied for both State and Australian Government funding.

 

Attachment 1 shows a location plan of the project and Attachment 2 shows the concept drawing of the proposed works.

 

The original Black Spot submission was made based on the 2016 traffic pattern and modelling data extracted from Main Roads WA (MRWA) Regional Operations Model 24 (ROM24) data. It was noted that additional traffic modelling and traffic movement change due to Freeway opening would be required in 2017/2018. Following the opening of the Mitchell Freeway extension in August 2017, the City reviewed the turning movement counts at the intersection to confirm the validity of the assumptions made in the initial traffic modelling.  This report will explain the differences between the two scenarios and the feasibility of the project based on the updated traffic movement pattern.

Detail

The State and Australian Government Black Spot Programs allow Local Government to receive funding towards recognised safety improvement at locations with a high number of reported crashes over the previous five year period.  The Marmion Avenue/Neerabup Road/Anchorage Drive roundabout recorded a total of 154 crashes for the five year period 2011 to 2015 and met the criteria for funding in both Federal and State funding.  Most of the crashes were on Marmion Avenue and attributed to the high volume of traffic on Marmion Avenue using this roundabout with an Average Weekday Traffic of over 50,000 vehicles per day prior to the freeway extension.

 

The installation of a left turn slip lane on the southbound approach requires traffic using this lane to merge with through traffic on Neerabup Road. Due to the proximity of the old Bunnings access and the traffic signals at the Key Largo/Neerabup Road intersection, the only feasible solution to merge traffic was to reduce the number of exit lanes onto Neerabup road from two to one.  This requires modifications to the Anchorage Drive entry lanes, reducing the number of through lanes from two to one. 

 

Although this is a Black Spot project with a primary focus on road safety, it is important to also consider the impact of the proposed project on how efficiently the roundabout will perform.  Administration undertook traffic modelling using thesoftware package, SIDRA intersection.  This model uses the geometric layout of the intersection and the number of vehicles using the intersection to predict how well the intersection will perform.

 

As the Mitchell Freeway extension was not completed at the time 2017/18 Black Spot applications were submitted (July 2016), Administration undertook preliminary modelling using existing traffic volumes and predicted traffic volumes based on the MRWA ROM model.  The major findings from this modelling were:

 

·    Improved traffic flow on Marmion Avenue (southbound) due to this installation of the left turn slip lane

·    Reduced traffic flow on Anchorage Drive due to the removal of one of the through lanes (necessary due to the old Bunnings access on Neerabup Road)

·    Overall improvement in traffic flows when all legs of the roundabout are considered

 

Although Anchorage Drive was expected to experience a drop in the level of service, given the improvements on Marmion Avenue in terms of performance and safety, Administration proceeded with the application for Black Spot funding based on the overall benefit to the community.

 

In December 2017, Administration appointed a consultant to undertake a turning movement count at the Marmion Avenue / Neerabup Road / Anchorage Drive roundabout to validate these results.  The traffic counts showed that the actual number of vehicles turning left from Marmion Avenue to Neerabup Road is much lower than predicted by the ROM model.

 

The reason for the discrepancy between the ROM model and the actual traffic volumes is due to the Hester Avenue / Mitchell Freeway interchange is working better than expected and delays are much shorter than anticipated.  Because of this, traffic is not using Marmion Avenue and Neerabup Road to avoid delays at the Hester Avenue interchange and the number of turning vehicles is much lower than predicted.

 

With these discrepancies between the ROM model traffic flows and the actual traffic flows, Administration has now completed additional traffic modelling in order to reassess the overall benefit to the community in proceeding with the project.

 

This updated traffic modelling indicates that the installation of a left turn slip lane and the modification to Anchorage Drive will have an overall negative effect on traffic flows at the roundabout.  In addition to the negative impact on traffic flows, the fact that there are a lower number of vehicles using the left turn slip lane than expected also limits the safety benefits that the project is likely to achieve. Therefore, by proceeding with the project the expected safety benefit is not realized but the Anchorage Drive traffic will still be negatively impacted. 

 

Consultation

 

Consultation has not been undertaken as yet; however it is planned to consult with the community in accordance with the City’s Community Engagement Policy prior to construction.

Comment

This Black Spot project was initiated to improve safety at the Marmion Avenue/Neerabup Road/Anchorage Drive intersection based on changes to traffic patterns predicted by the ROM model.  With the Mitchell Freeway now open and traffic counts have been completed, the measured traffic volumes are significantly lower than predicted by the ROM model which reduces the safety benefits that this project will achieve. 

 

The location of the access to the old Bunnings site on Neerabup Road has made it necessary to reduce the number of roundabout exit lanes on Neerabup Road from two to one in order for the merge lane to meet appropriate standards.  This requires that the Anchorage Drive entry be reduced from two through lanes to a single through lane.  Traffic modelling shows that this will lead to increased queuing on Anchorage Drive.  This outcome was considered acceptable under the ROM Model predictions as the slip lane was expected to improve safety at the intersection and to reduce queue lengths on Marmion Avenue.  As the traffic data does not support the expected increase in vehicles turning left from Marmion Avenue to Neerabup Road, it is no longer considered practical to reduce the number of through lanes on Anchorage Drive.  On-site inspections by Administration show that the roundabout is operating well under the current configuration with significant reduction in queuing and delays since the opening of the Mitchell Freeway extension.  If this project were to proceed, the additional delays anticipated on Anchorage Drive may reduce safety at the intersection if motorists were to become frustrated with the longer delays and engage in risk taking behaviour.

 

Administration does not recommend proceeding with the project at this time due to the following factors:

 

·    Expected safety benefits are unlikely to be realised

·    Increased queuing and delays at the roundabout

·    No suitable alternative treatment

·    Significant cost of the project of $800,000

 

Administration has considered alternative options to utilise Federal funding to improve safety at the intersection of Marmion Avenue/Neerabup Road/Anchorage Drive; skid resistant treatment, pre-deflection and traffic signals were all considered, however none were shown to provide a BCR sufficient to qualify for Federal Black Spot funding.

 

Following the opening of the Mitchell Freeway extension, overall traffic volumes at the intersection have dropped by over 25%, it is expected that even without proceeding with the proposed Black Spot treatment, the number of crashes at this intersection will reduce by a similar amount through reduced exposure to risk.  Based on crash rates prior to the Mitchell Freeway extension, this would see a reduction of approximately 33 crashes over a five year period without this Black Spot project proceeding.

 

Administration recommends ongoing monitoring of the intersection and a safety review at this roundabout to be conducted using crash data for the five years following the Mitchell Freeway extension (2018-2022).

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Built)

3.5    Connected and Accessible City

3.5.1 Deliver local transport infrastructure including roads, footpaths and cycle ways to improve accessibility

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Since the project is 100% funded by Federal - Black Spot there was no municipal funding allocation in 2017/18 budget. As a result, the return of funding for this project will have no financial implication for the City.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.      DOES NOT PROCEED with the Black Spot project at the roundabout of Marmion Avenue/Neerabup Road/Anchorage Drive and notifies MRWA accordingly; and

2.      REQUESTS Administration to monitor the safety and traffic performance at the intersection.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Marmion Avenue Neerabup Road Black Spot Location Map

16/289932

 

2.

Marmion Neerabup Black Spot Traffic Treatment Drawing 3269-4-A

16/289933

 

  


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AS03-02/18      Main Roads WA Amendments to the Road Classification Process

File Ref:                                               3000V02 – 18/17961

Responsible Officer:                            Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To update Council with respect to the proposed changes to the road classification process and the impact of these changes on the reclassification of Marmion Avenue and Ocean Reef Road / Gnangara Road as Primary Distributor roads under State control.

Background

In July 2011, a joint application was submitted to Main Roads WA (MRWA) by the City of Wanneroo and the City of Joondalup for the reclassification of Marmion Avenue as a Primary Distributor Road from Ocean Reef Road and Lukin Drive.  A further joint application by the City of Wanneroo, City of Joondalup and City of Swan was submitted to MRWA in August 2011 for the reclassification of Ocean Reef Road and Gnangara Road between Marmion Avenue and West Swan Road.

 

MRWA denied both of these requests.  In the case of Marmion Avenue MRWA recommended that:

 

“Although Marmion Avenue does not presently meet the criteria for a Primary Distributor Road (a 'highway' under the Main Roads Act), it would be appropriate to reconsider the matter once Yanchep has been developed to the point where it is clearly functioning as a Strategic Metropolitan Centre.”

 

Regarding the reclassification of Ocean Reef Road/ Gnangara Road, MRWA recommended that:

 

“Notwithstanding that finding, planned road improvements to Gnangara Road and the expected further development of the Ellenbrook centre could change the outcome of the assessment in time and it should be reviewed in five years.”

 

In December 2016, Report AS01-12/16 was presented to Council to consider the submission of another application for reclassification of Marmion Avenue and Ocean Reef Road / Gnangara Road as it was considered warranted given level of development within the City over the previous five years. At this time, MRWA indicated that the criteria for the classification of roads was being reviewed with Western Australian Local Government Association (WALGA) under the Future State Administered Roads Project.  While this review was underway, assessments for road reclassification were no longer being accepted by MRWA. 

 

Based on the information provided in Report AS01-12/16, it was resolved that Council:-

“1.      RECOGNISES the importance of Yanchep as a Strategic Metropolitan Centre and SEEKS the reclassification of Marmion Avenue, Ocean Reef Road and Gnangara Road as Primary Distributor Roads by the State Government;

2.      SEEKS a timely dualling of Marmion Avenue to Yanchep Beach Road by the State Government or alternately the provision of State funding to the City to undertake the dualling as a high priority;

3.     RECOGNISES the importance of Ellenbrook as a Secondary Centre and SEEKS the reclassification of Ocean Reef Road and Gnangara Road as Primary Distributor Roads by the State Government;

4.      REQUESTS that the Mayor writes to the Honourable Premier and Minister for Transport on Items 1, 2 and 3; and

5.      REQUESTS the Chief Executive Officer to write to Cities of Joondalup and Swan, seeking their support for these road reclassification requests.”

In accordance with the Council resolutions the Mayor wrote to the Honourable Premier and Minister for Transport. While these roads were not accepted as State roads at that time, the State Government has provided the City with $23M to undertake a project to upgrade Marmion Avenue to a four lane dual carriageway between Butler and Yanchep.

 

 Detail

 

Main Roads WA provided a web release to WALGA members regarding the proposed changes to the criteria being used to determine road classification under the Future State Administered Roads Project Attachment 1.

 

Key changes to the classification process within built up areas include:

 

·    Introduction of a two tier system to take into account both the requirements of the Main Roads Act 1930 as well as the functional requirements of the State Road Network.

·    Tier 1 is a broad filter, outlining a modern interpretation of the Main Roads Act 1930. If the route under assessment meets the requirements outlined in Tier 1, it is deemed to meet the requirements of a modern interpretation of the Main Roads Act 1930. If the route under assessment meets the requirements of Tier 1, it is subject to the Tier 2 assessment.

·    Tier 2 is a more detailed assessment, using a point scoring criteria/measure method to determine whether a road should become a part of the State Road Network.

 

The inclusion of a two tiered assessment is supported by Administration as it provides greater certainty for the City in future applications. 

 

Tier 1 requires that a road satisfies required measures relating to Planning, Statutory, Transport and Traffic Volume which deems the road as meeting the requirements under the Main Roads Act 1930.  This is important because in the City’s application for the reclassification of Marmion Avenue in 2011, the required score was met but Main Roads rejected the application as they deemed it failed to meet the requirements of the Main Roads Act 1930.

 

Tier 2 provides multi criteria assessment based on a number of distinct factors.  Although there have been some changes to the criteria used and the associated weightings, this Tier 2 assessment is similar to the existing assessment process.  The score achieved under Tier 2 is based on the following measures:

 

·    Strategic Role

·    Network Role

Restricted Access Vehicle Network

Public Transport

Connectivity

Property Access

·    Design Function

Number of Lanes

Road Classification

·    Traffic Volumes

Annual Average Daily Traffic volumes

Heavy Vehicle Traffic

 

Appendix A of Attachment 1 provides details on the proposed changes to the assessment criteria and provides comments from MRWA on the reasons for these changes.

 

Appendix B of Attachment 1 shows roads which have met the requirements for reclassification based on a preliminary assessment by MRWA.  The following roads within the City have been identified by this process:

 

·    Marmion Avenue

·    Hester Avenue

·    Neaves Road and either Flynn Drive and Neerabup Road or Joondalup Drive and Burns Beach Road

·    Gnangara Road and either Ocean Reef Road or Whitfords Avenue

·    Alexander Drive

 

Administration supports the roads identified in MRWA’s preliminary assessment.  These are all highly trafficked major arterial roads which provide good connectivity between strategic/major residential, commercial and industrial centres.

 

These roads are considered likely, though not guaranteed, to pass a full assessment by MRWA once the new assessment criteria have been adopted.  If these roads prove to be successful under the new process, the timing of any transfer of ownership of the City’s roads to the State Government would depend on the assessment score relative to roads within other Local Government Areas and the capacity of the State Government to successfully budget for this transfer of ownership.

Consultation

Nil

Comment

Overall, Administration is supportive of the proposed changes to the road classification process as proposed by MRWA.  A number of concerns were identified by Administration and comments (reproduced below) were provided to WALGA on 8 December 2017 (Attachment 2 refers) to collate with comments from other Local Governments and forward to MRWA for consideration:

 

·    The introduction of Tier 1 provides much needed clarity on how MRWA will interpret the relevant sections of the Main Roads Act 1930.  The preliminary assessment of roads provided in Appendix B appear to align with Council’s previously stated position that Marmion Avenue, Ocean Reef Road and Gnangara Road would best be managed as part of the State Road Network; 

 

·    The City’s view is that Neaves Road/Flynn Drive/Neerabup Road and Neaves Road/Joondalup Drive/Burns Beach Road should both be considered for reclassification as State roads;

 

·    The weighting for traffic volumes should be increased and the weighting for public transport should be reduced as buses better serve the community when they operate through the local road network;

 

·    There is a lack of detail provided regarding proposed changes to the new State Road Funds to Local Government Agreement. It is acknowledged that funding changes are necessary to reflect the shift in maintenance costs from Local Government to State Government; however the LGA should not be left in a worse financial position by the proposed changes. This is particularly relevant to growth Councils such as Wanneroo, who are required to maintain an ever-growing road network; and

 

·    Further clarification regarding the proposed timeframe for the transferal of roads under this process is required.  The current arrangement of short term, medium term and long term does not allow for the level of forward-planning required by the City.

 

To date, a response to these comments has not been received by the City. Final approval of the new methodology will require approval by MRWA and the Minister for Transport, Planning and Lands.  Although a timeframe is not able to be provided, it has been indicated that MRWA is looking to implement this new methodology as soon as possible.

 

Although no timeframe is available at this time, Administration considers that the development of this new procedure and the preliminary assessment by MRWA demonstrations significant progress on this issue. Council previously identified the importance to the City of reclassifying Marmion Avenue and Ocean Reef Road / Gnangara Road as State managed Primary Distributor roads.  The inclusion of these roads on the list of roads identified in MRWA’s preliminary assessment for reclassification is a clear step forward in achieving this goal.

Statutory Compliance

The legal basis on which roads are classified is set out in Section 13 of the Main Roads Act 1930.  The proposed classification process provides MRWA with guidance on how to meet their requirements under the Act.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Built)

3.5    Connected and Accessible City

3.5.1 Deliver local transport infrastructure including roads, footpaths and cycle ways to improve accessibility

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Where roads are reclassified, their management responsibility is transferred from Local Government to State Government.  This has significant financial implications for the City given both maintenance costs and the cost of future upgrades could be transferred to the State Government.

 

The City undertook financial modelling as part of Report AS01-12/16 to estimate the total expenditure associated with Marmion Avenue and Ocean Reef Road/ Gnangara Road over the next 20 years.  For Marmion Avenue, operating expenditure was estimated at $15.7M which includes regular verge maintenance and carriageway maintenance such as sweeping, stormwater cleaning, etc. Capital expenditure was estimated at $21.1M which excludes dualling of the road (which has been funded by State Government), but includes possible intersection upgrades and resurfacing, giving a total expenditure of $36.8M over the 20 year period 2018/19 to 2037/38.  Similar analysis for Ocean Reef Road/ Gnangara Road shows and operating expenditure of $7.1M and a capital expenditure of $10.6M giving a total expenditure of $17.7M.

 

It is noted that the web release from MRWA, shown as Attachment 1, that there will be a change in the State Funds to Local Roads Funding Agreement to reflect this transfer of responsibility from Local Government to State Government. No details of these funding changes have been provided to Local Government which is one of the points raised by Administration as requiring further information from MRWA.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council ENDORSES the comments (Attachment 2) provided by Administration to Western Australian Local Government Association on Main Roads WA Road Classification Process.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Microsoft Word - Future Roads Project Website release 2017 FINAL

18/18454

 

2.

Proposed Changes to Road Classification Methodology & MRWA Guidelines - Letter to WALGA

18/23939

Minuted

 

 

 


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Community & Place

Community Facilities

CP01-02/18      Grant to Upgrade Floodlighting at Abbeville Park

File Ref:                                               32956 – 17/428547

Responsible Officer:                            Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To consider the successful Local Projects Local Jobs (LPLJ) grant to upgrade floodlighting at Abbeville Park, Mindarie.

Background

Location

 

Abbeville Park is located at 17 Abbeville Circle in Mindarie and includes an active playing area, cricket wickets, two changerooms and toilets (no showers), carpark, floodlighting (not to Australian Standard), playground, basketball hoop and passive park furniture. Refer to Attachment 1 for aerial map.

 

Property Type

Crown Land - COW Managed

Lot No.

12424

Reserve No.

43899

Reserve Purpose

Public Recreation

Lot Area

4.4ha

POS Hierarchy (LPP4.3)

Neighbourhood Active

 

The multipurpose reserve is used by Mindarie Football Club (soccer), Mindarie Little Athletics Club, Quinns Rocks Junior Cricket Club and the Department of Education (Mindarie Primary School).

 

Active Reserve Master Plan

 

As part of the City’s Active Reserve Master Plans, Abbeville Park underwent a concept plan that identified a number of upgrades including the provision of additional storage rooms and a floodlighting upgrade to 50 lux (Attachment 2). Both projects are listed on the City’s Capital Works Program and Long Term Strategic Plan respectively as follows:

 

Storage Rooms (PR-4118):

·    2017/18: Design - $10,000 (underway)

·    2018/19: Construct - $85,000

 

Floodlighting Upgrade:

·    2018/19: Design - $30,000

·    2019/20: Construct - $320,000

Detail

The Local Projects Local Jobs (LPLJ) initiative is administered by the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries (DLGSCI). The program provides grants to community organisations to deliver important upgrades to facilities and programs.

 

An LPLJ grant of $400,000 has been committed to Mindarie Football Club and awarded to the City for upgrades at Abbeville Reserve.

 

In discussions with Mindarie FC and the Local Member it was determined that the LPLJ grant should be used bring the floodlighting upgrade project forward to this financial year and increase the upgrade to 100 lux. Any remaining funds will be put towards the construction of the storage rooms in 2018/19.

 

As per the City’s Sports Floodlighting Policy (Attachment 3):

 

“Clubs may apply to increase or improve the illumination levels beyond the specific standard…The cost of the installation will be the responsibility of the club or clubs allocated the facility.”

 

Consequently Mindarie FC has requested to use the LPLJ grant to increase the floodlighting from the City standard 50 lux (training levels) to 100 lux (match levels).

 

A draft Project Management Plan has been developed and a summary of the key tasks is provided below. Note this schedule is subject to further refinement through the Project Management Plan phase.

 

Key Tasks / Milestones

Anticipated Start

Anticipated Finish

Council Approval of Budget

Feb 2018

Feb 2018

Design and Costing Procurement

Mar 2018

Mar 2018

Detailed Design & Construction Documentation

Apr 2018

Apr 2018

LPLJ Grant Documentation

Apr 2018

Apr 2018

Consultation

May 2018

May 2018

Permits and approvals

May 2018

May 2018

Construction Tender

Jun 2018

Jun 2018

Director Approval to award Contract

Jun 2018

Jul 2018

Construction

Aug 2018

Nov 2018

Handover

Nov 2018

Nov 2018

LPLJ Acquittal

Nov 2018

Nov 2018

Consultation

Administration has been in consultation with Mindarie FC, the Local Member and the Department of LGSCI.

 

Consultation for the project will be carried out in line with the City’s Community Engagement Policy to “Inform” relevant stakeholders.

Comment

In regards to the Abbeville Park Storage Rooms (PR-4118), design procurement is currently underway with the following tasks anticipated below:

 

Key Tasks / Milestones

Anticipated Start

Anticipated Finish

Design procurement

1 Dec 2017

31 Jan 2018

Concept design

1 Feb 2018

14 Mar 2018

Development Approval

15 Mar 2018

15 May 2018

Construction procurement

15 May 2018

30 Jun 2018

Construction

1 Jul 2018

30 Sept 2018

Handover

30 Sept 2018

30 Oct 2018

 

The current funding breakdown is summarised below:

 

Financial Year

Funding Source

Total

Municipal Fund

Grants

Cont.

Reserves

Loan

TPS

2017/18

$0

$10,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$10,000

2018/19

$85,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$85,000

Total

$85,000

$10,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$95,000

 

Any remaining grant funds after the completion of the floodlighting project will be used to supplement the funding of the storage rooms.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.1 Create opportunities that encourage community wellbeing and active and healthy lifestyles

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O15  Project Management

Low

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Manage

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s Strategic/Corporate risk register. 

Policy Implications

As indicated, this project will comply with the Community Engagement and Sports Floodlighting Policies.

Financial Implications

The current Long Term Financial Plan Capital Works Program to upgrade the Abbeville floodlights to 50 lux is listed as follows:

 

Financial Year

Funding Source

Total

Municipal Fund

Grants

Cont.

Reserves

Loan

TPS

2018/19

$30,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$30,000

2019/20

$215,000

$105,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$320,000

Total

$235,000

$105,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$350,000

 

It is proposed that 2017/18 Capital Works Program be amended to include the upgrade to Abbeville floodlights to 100 lux. On this basis the proposed funding source and staging would be as follows:

 

Financial Year

Funding Source

Total

Municipal Fund

Grants

Cont.

Reserves

Loan

TPS

2017/18

$0

$15,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$15,000

2018/19

$0

$385,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$385,000

Total

$0

$400,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$400,000

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.      ACCEPTS the Local Projects Local Jobs Grant of $400,000 for upgrades at Abbeville Reserve;

2.      APPROVES BY ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the budget amendment for the Abbeville Floodlighting Upgrade from the current:

Financial Year

Funding Source

Total

Municipal Fund

Grants

Cont.

Reserves

Loan

TPS

2018/19

$30,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$30,000

2019/20

$215,000

$105,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$320,000

Total

$235,000

$105,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$350,000

To the proposed:

Financial Year

Funding Source

Total

Municipal Fund

Grants

Cont.

Reserves

Loan

TPS

2017/18

$0

$15,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$15,000

2018/19

$0

$385,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$385,000

Total

$0

$400,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$400,000

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Aerial - Abbeville Park, Mindarie

17/432250

 

2.

Abbeville Park - Concept Plan

14/370006

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Community Safety & Emergency Management Report

CP02-02/18      Terms of Reference - Bush Fire Advisory Committee

File Ref:                                               20848 – 17/440700

Responsible Officer:                            Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider and approve the draft Terms of Reference for the establishment of a Bush Fire Advisory Committee (BFAC).

Background

The proposed establishment of a BFAC has come about as a result of a request from the Volunteer Bushfire Brigades Executive Management Team meeting held in September 2017.

 

Consequently, the establishment of the committee was considered by Council at its meeting held on 7 November 2017 (CP08-11/17), in which Council resolved the following:

 

“That Council:-

1.   ENDORSE the establishment of a Bush Fire Advisory Committee;

2.   NOTES the Terms of Reference are under development;

3.   REQUESTS Administration to undertake the necessary processes to establish the Bush Fire Advisory Committee; and

4.   ENDORSES the Elected Member nominee to the Bush Fire Advisory Committee being Cr Newton.”

Detail

The draft Terms of Reference have been included as (Attachment 1) and drafted in accordance with the City’s Management Procedure for Committees and Working Groups.

 

The purpose of the committee is to provide advice to Council regarding matters relating to the Bush Fires Act 1954, Section 67(1):

 

A local government may at any time appoint such persons as it thinks fit as a bush fire advisory committee for the purpose of advising the local government regarding all matters relating to the preventing, controlling and extinguishing of bush fires, the planning of the layout of firebreaks in the district, prosecutions for breaches of this Act, the formation of bush fire brigades and the grouping thereof under group brigade officers, the ensuring of cooperation and coordination of bush fire brigades in their efforts and activities, and any other matter relating to bush fire control whether of the same kind as or a different kind from, those specified in this subsection.

 

Membership of the committee has been proposed as follows:

 

Voting:

·    Council’s appointed representative on the Local Emergency Management Committee (LEMC);

·    Chief Bush Fire Control Officer;

·    Deputy Chief Bush Fire Control Officers;

·    One nominated representative from each Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade.

 

Non Voting:

·    City of Wanneroo Chief Executive Officer or delegate;

·    Manager Community Safety and Emergency Management or delegate;

·    Training Coordinator (Volunteer Brigade Members);

·    One representative from Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES);

·    One representative from Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions.

Consultation

The draft Terms of Reference have been considered by the City’s Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades Executive Management Team.

Comment

The Bush Fire Advisory Committee will be established pursuant to Section 67 of the Bush Fires Act 1954.  The City’s objective is to make the City of Wanneroo a safe community by managing the risk of fire through the delivery and implementation of fire prevention, preparedness, response and recovery strategies.

 

It is the objective of this committee to advise the Council on matters relating to:

 

·    Strategic actions with respect to Fire Management Plans, other related bush fire mitigation issues and community education initiatives;

·    The effective use of personnel, training, equipment, protective clothing and communication facilities; and

·    Advice on annual fire breaks notices issued under Section 33 of the Bush Fires Act 1954.

 

Further benefits of establishing the BFAC will include:

 

·    Create a forum to discuss strategic matters for the provision of fire and emergency services within the City;

·    Continue to build a strong, effective and collaborative working relationship between the City, DFES and the brigades;

·    Provide timely advice to Council on matters relating to bush fire mitigation and planning.

 

Once the Terms of Reference for the BFAC have been approved, arrangements will be made for the first meeting to be held.

Statutory Compliance

Section 5.8 of the Local Government Act 1995 states –

“A local government may establish committees of 3 or more persons to assist the council and to exercise the powers and discharge the duties of the local government that can be delegated to committees.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.2    Safe Communities

1.2.1 Enable community to be prepared and to recover from emergency situations

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O23 Safety of Community

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Community and Place

Manage

 

The above risks relating to the issue contained within this report have been identified and considered within the City’s Corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council APPROVES the Terms of Reference for the Bush Fire Advisory Committee as detailed in (Attachment 1).

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Terms of Reference - Bush Fire Advisory Committee (January 2018)

17/356906

Minuted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              136

CP03-02/18      Voluntary Surrender of Dogs and Cats Proposed Amendment to Fees and Charges

File Ref:                                               2027V02 – 18/7622

Responsible Officer:                            Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil       

 

Issue

To consider amending the City of Wanneroo’s Schedule of Fees and Charges in relation to the voluntary surrender of dogs pursuant to defined criteria, and removing reference for the Manager Community Safety and Emergency Management to waive certain fees at their discretion.

Background

Where a dog or cat is voluntarily surrendered to an authorised officer a fee is payable in accordance with the City’s prescribed Fees and Charges schedule.

 

An authorised officer may seek approval to have the scheduled fee for the voluntary surrender of a dog waivered where a dog has been involved in a serious attack and the owner voluntarily agrees to surrender the dog in the public interest.

 

The City’s current 2017/2018 Schedule of Fees and Charges (17/171343) identifies fees, as detailed below, that may be waivered at the Manager Community Safety and Emergency Management’s discretion:

·    Impound/sustenance Fee (first 7 days);

·    Surrender of Dogs; and

·    Surrender of Cats.

Detail

As a result of revised delegations for waiving fees and charges, when authorised officers are investigating a serious dog attack and a determination is made that the voluntary surrender of the animal and the waiver of the voluntary surrender fee is in the public interest, they must:

 

·    Seek agreement from the owner to the voluntary surrender of the dog;

·    Prepare a report to the Director Corporate Strategy and Performance or Chief Executive Officer (who are the only officers with delegated authority to waiver prescribed fees), seeking approval to waiver the voluntary surrender fee in the public interest.

 

The 2017/18 surrender fee per dog is $300.  This fee recovers some of the time taken by Rangers to engage with the dog owner, take possession of the dog, and the costs associated with impounding and feeding the dog for up to seven (7) days.  After this period if the dog passes behavioural testing it may be adopted or transferred to the Shenton Park dog home.  However, if behavioural testing determines the dog to be aggressive the dog will be destroyed by a veterinarian.

 

In instances where surrender occurs due to a dog having committed a serious attack, the surrender fee includes the destruction of the dog as soon as practicable by a veterinarian.

 

Records relating to surrendered dogs for the period 2016-17 indicate that a total of 41 dogs were surrendered in this period, with 14 of these surrendered due to dog attacks.

 

If the fee waiver is approved, the officer must return to the owner’s property and take possession of the animal.

 

The delay in taking possession of the animal whilst awaiting approval for the waiver of the scheduled fee provides owners the opportunity to change their minds regarding the voluntary surrender of the animal, which may result in increased operational duties for the officer and taking legal measures to seize the animal under warrant. Such seizures are often distressing for animals and their owners.

 

To streamline the voluntary dog surrender process, it is proposed to seek Council approval to amend the Schedule of Fees and Charges to remove the payment of a fee for the voluntary surrender of a dog involved in a serious attack, where the circumstances meet the following public interest criteria.

 

Public Interest Criteria

·    The dog has been involved in an attack that has caused serious injury or death to a person or animal; or

·    The dog has caused injury to persons or animals on multiple occasions.

 

The definition that is applied to serious injury is an injury requiring medical or veterinary attention in the nature of a broken bone, a laceration requiring sutures, the total or partial loss of sensation or function in a part of the body, or an injury requiring cosmetic surgery.  This definition is recognised and used by Local Governments across Australia.

 

The Public Interest Criteria is not intended for the fees to be waivered for all surrendered animals, only those that present a significant risk.

Consultation

Consultation was undertaken with relevant internal Service Units.

Comment

Under the City’s current delegations the authority to waiver a scheduled fee is at the discretion of the Director Corporate Strategy and Performance or the Chief Executive Officer. 

 

The timeframe involved in seeking this approval may result in adverse outcomes such as the dog owner reconsidering voluntary surrender and necessitating judicial process to seize the dog under warrant.

 

Further, the current Schedule of Fees and Charges contains wording that indicates the Manager Community Safety and Emergency Management can waive fees for impound/sustenance, surrender of dogs and surrender of cats at their discretion which is in contravention of the delegated authority.  The proposed amendments to the Schedule of Fees and Charges are intended to correct this situation.

Statutory Compliance

Local Government Act 1995, Section 6.12 - Power to defer, grant discounts, waive or write off debts.

 

Legislative provision (LGA s.6.19) also requires a local public notice to be given of fees and charges imposed or changed after the budget is adopted.

 

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.2    Safe Communities

1.2.1 Enable community to be prepared and to recover from emergency situations

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-023 Safety of Community

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Community & Place

Manage

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s existing Corporate Risk Register. Action Plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Whilst there may be a small reduction in income from the collection of fees, a greater saving can be expected from the reduction in the number of court actions to have relevant dogs seized.

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council APPROVES BY ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the amendment of the Fees and Charges Schedule to:-

 

1.      REMOVE the reference that fees may be waived at Manager Community Safety and Emergency Management discretion for impound fees listed below:

·        Impound/sustenance Fee (first 7 days)

·        Surrender of Dogs

·        Surrender of Cats

 

2.      INSERT a reference that the following fees do not apply to dogs that have been voluntarily surrendered by the owner and meet the below public interest criteria:

·        Impound/sustenance Fee

·        Surrender of Dogs

 


 

 

3.      INSERT “Public Interest Criteria”

·        The dog has been involved in an attack that has caused serious injury or death to a person or animal; or

·        The dog has caused injury to persons or animals on multiple occasions.

 

 

Attachments: Nil


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              140

CP04-02/18      Establishment of Two Rocks State Emergency Services (SES)

File Ref:                                               1904 – 18/24977

Responsible Officer:                            Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil       

 

Issue

To consider the establishment of a new State Emergency Services (SES) Unit at Two Rocks to be co-located at the Two Rocks Fire Station with the Two Rocks Bush Fire Brigade.

Background

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) currently provides SES volunteers to the Cities of Joondalup and Wanneroo through the Wanneroo/Joondalup SES Unit located in a purpose built facility situated in the City of Joondalup.

 

As a result of a capability review conducted by DFES of SES units in the metropolitan region, a gap was identified in delivery of SES services in the expanding North Coastal Region within the jurisdictions of the City of Wanneroo and the Shire of Gingin. Options were explored to develop a plan to build capacity for provision of a timely and effective response to natural hazard incidents, and addressing the identified capability gap.

 

It was recognised that the most suitable option was to establish a SES unit co-located at Two Rocks in conjunction with the Two Rocks BFB. 

 

DFES approached the City and the Two Rocks BFB initially in July 2017 seeking permission for this proposal.  Permission was granted in November 2017 for the SES to co-locate temporarily until a purpose built facility is constructed.  At the time, no discussion transpired relating to the broader implications for the City resulting from the establishment of a new SES Unit, including with the Emergency Services Levy (ESL) grant funding.

Detail

The SES Unit at Two Rocks will initially be a group of approximately 20 members with the following basic operational roles:

 

·        Unit Management;

·        Storm Damage;

·        Urban Search and Rescue (USAR Category1);

·        Land Search;

·        Incident Triage;

·        Incident Control Centre (Level 1);

·        Incident Management; and

·        Miscellaneous – Transport and incident support

 

DFES advise their responsibilities will be to manage all aspects of operational response inclusive of issuing and funding management of personal protective clothing, insurance for vehicles, equipment and volunteers during all operational incidents, workers compensation and injury management and day to day management of the volunteers.

 

It should be noted that the ESL provides funds through the Local Government Grant Scheme (LGGS) to local governments via Capital or Operating grants for BFBs and SES Units where applicable.  This means that the City of Wanneroo will be required to administer the LGGS monies allocated for the operating cost of the new SES Unit and will involve the ESL budget allocations and acquittal of monies expended under LGGS.  Operating grants are paid to Local Governments annually in July, October, January and April in equal quarterly instalments.

 

It is anticipated this will not impose a greater burden on the City for the acquittal process as this will be incorporated into the current LGGS acquittal forms currently administered and submitted by the City for the BFBs.

Consultation

Consultation has been undertaken with DFES and the Two Rocks Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade who are in agreement with the proposed co-location with the Two Rocks SES Unit.

Comment

It is proposed that in the future a new six bay co-location facility will be built on the current Two Rocks BFB site.  This will be subject to application and approval of Capital Building Works through the LGGS process and may take up to three (3) to four (4) years for this to eventuate.

Statutory Compliance

Part 3A of the Fire and Emergency Services Act 1998 relates to the State Emergency Services functions and powers.

 

The administration of the grant income and associated expenditure for the Two Rocks SES Unit will be undertaken in accordance with the LGGS Manual for Capital and Operating Grants.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.2    Safe Communities

1.2.1 Enable community to be prepared and to recover from emergency situations

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O23 Safety of Community

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Community and Place

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s Corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

DFES advised that SES units differ from a BFB in that there is no expectation of municipal funding contributions from the City.  However, there may be from time to time a budget overspend at the end of a financial year which the City will either be reimbursed by DFES, or may have to cover until such time as the following financial year’s budget is allocated and the City will be refunded for the overspend.  Any overspend will only be incurred by mutual agreement of the City and the DFES Regional Superintendent.

 

All vehicles allocated to the new SES unit will be transferred under the control of the City and any costs associated with those vehicles will be funded from allocated LGGS monies.  This includes vehicle insurance (for all non-operational periods) and registration.  Vehicle maintenance will be managed by the City and all costs funded from LGGS monies. This is similar to the arrangement currently in place with BFB vehicles.

 

As part of the proposal to co-locate the SES with the BFB, the City will be responsible for the LGGS budget allocations and operational management of expenditure.  Both these aspects will however be in conjunction with DFES to ensure budgets are allocated correctly and due diligence is adhered to when expenditure requests are received.

 

State grant funding will be received by the City from DFES on a quarterly basis. Upon completion of the financial year Administration will be required to complete an acquittal process not dissimilar to the current process with the BFBs.

 

As part of the 2017/2018 Mid-Year Budget Review, $22,000 has been included as operating income together with a corresponding $22,000 in expenditure in anticipation of the new SES Unit in Two Rocks being established.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.      ENDORSES the establishment of State Emergency Services (SES) Unit at Two Rocks;

2.      NOTES the new SES Unit co-location at Two Rocks Fire Station in conjunction with the Two Rocks Bush Fire Brigade (BFB); and

3.      APPROVES the City, in conjunction with DFES, administering the Local Government Grant Scheme (LGGS) Emergency Services Levy (ESL) budget allocated for the operating costs of the new Two Rocks SES Unit.

 

 

Attachments: Nil  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              143

 

Community Services

CP05-02/18      Youth Strategy 2017/18 - 2020/21

File Ref:                                               32318 – 17/424711

Responsible Officer:                            Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To present the City of Wanneroo’s draft Youth Strategy 2017/18–2020/21 for adoption.

Background

The City of Wanneroo’s Corporate Business Plan 2017/2018 commits to the development and implementation of a Youth Strategy. The City offers a range of services to young people residing within the City including information provision, education services and programs.  Youth Service delivers school holiday and term programs and activities through four community facilities including youth and community centres. Youth specific community engagement, community events and outreach services are also provided.  The draft Youth Strategy 2017/18-2020/21 (Attachment 1) has been developed through an extensive consultation process and provides a vision for the City of Wanneroo in ensuring that young people are valued, empowered and supported to reach their full potential and connected to community to support a quality lifestyle.

 

It is evident through global and local youth strategies and policy changes, as well as the findings from youth and community engagement, that the City has a role to play in meeting the needs and aspirations of young people within the community. In alignment with the City’s Strategic Community Plan and the Corporate Business Plan this role is changing to be more strategic in nature, rather than the traditional model that focuses only on direct service provision. The Youth Strategy provides a vision for young people in community and includes three driving principles focus the City’s efforts to be responsive to the changing community profile and needs, and to ensure efficient, sustainable and agile services for young people within the City of Wanneroo.

Detail

The Youth Strategy was guided by community consultation and State and Federal policy including:

·        The National Strategy for Young Australians;

·        Closing the Gap;

·        Social Inclusion Agenda;

·        The Convention of the Rights of the Child;

·        Our Youth – Our Future – Western Australia’s Youth Strategic Framework; and

·        Government of Western Australia’s Delivering Community Services in Partnership Policy.

 

State-wide consultation has commenced through the Department of Communities with the launch of the Better Choices: Youth in WA discussion paper.  This paper is designed to start a discussion on how best to reform Western Australia’s Youth Service system and provides young people with the opportunity to have their say and help shape the future of youth services. Recommendations from the paper will help inform the State Government’s five-year Youth Strategy and three-year action plan for the improvement of youth support services. 

 

The City of Wanneroo Youth Service will remain cognisant of current policy, practice and legislation relevant to young people.  Where a significant shift in State or Commonwealth policy occurs, an internal review will be facilitated of the actions aligned to the City of Wanneroo Youth Strategy to ensure they remain agile and responsive to the needs of young people within our community. 

 

The vision of the Youth Strategy is that young people are valued, empowered and supported to reach their full potential and connected to community to support a quality lifestyle.

 

The Strategy is built on three core principles:

 

Principle One: Health, Safety and Wellbeing

Goal: The community is safe and welcoming for all.  Young people’s health, safety and wellbeing are promoted to support their personal and social development.

Definition: The City facilitates and advocates for information and access to relevant health and wellbeing services for young people, including the promotion of positive health, safety and wellbeing initiatives and messages. The City facilitates and advocates for enhanced communication of information and services relevant to young people.  

 

Principle Two: Participation, Leadership and Celebration

Goal:  Young people’s strengths are recognised and they are supported to be engaged.

Definition: The City advocates for young people in the community and is a place where the ideas and opinions of young people are encouraged and valued. Young people are empowered to contribute to the future of our community and the community actively recognises and celebrates their diversity and strengths. The facilitation and delivery of activities and events aligned to community needs and interests, enriches young people’s participation in community.

 

Principle Three: Learn and Work

Goal: Young people are provided with opportunities to learn and work.

Definition: The City provides and supports opportunities which encourage and connect young people to employment and learning opportunities. By being informed of current and future employment trends the City will support online education, entrepreneurship and volunteering. Scholarships are promoted and supported in recognition of young people’s commitment to education and community.

Consultation

The City’s main consultation informing the development of the Youth Strategy were the CATALYSE survey and the consultation branded YSpeak!  This consultation encompassed a range of engagement activities involving young people, key stakeholders and schools and engaged with over 1300 young people.  More recently Yspeak! Yanchep Survey has been undertaken within the northern corridor to further inform the development of the City’s Youth Strategy vision and principles.

Comment

The City’s Youth Service has historically focused on the delivery of programs within youth centres and the delivery of school holiday activities.  This model of service delivery is not attracting high numbers of young people to the programs.  There is an opportunity to further explore the needs and interests of young people within the broader community and the differentiation of needs across different localities. 

 

The MARKYT Community Scorecard outcomes and other City consultation activities have identified that the broader community lack awareness of services that the City provides for young people, and that they have an expectation that services are provided in place through an engaging and proactive outreach model which builds community awareness and supports young people who do not live close to youth centres.  In response to this feedback, a number of actions within the draft Youth Strategy refer to the review of service models, including the City’s youth centre model and youth outreach models.

Statutory Compliance

The Youth Strategy supports and complements the following plans and strategies:

·        Early Childhood Strategy;

·        Economic Development Strategy & Action Plan;

·        Library Services Strategy;

·        Community Hubs Model;

·        Access and Inclusion Plan;

·        Reconciliation Action Plan; and

·        Strategic Community Plan 2017/2018 – 2026/2027.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.4    Connected Communities

1.4.1 Connect communities through engagement and involvement

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

All costs of developing the draft Youth Strategy have been captured in the City’s 2017/18 budget.  Ongoing costs on delivering actions within the Strategy will be subject to relevant operational and capital budget approvals.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council ADOPTS the Youth Strategy as per Attachment 1.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

DRAFT Youth Strategy 2017/18 - 2020/21

17/356190

Minuted

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              146

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              160

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              167

 

Corporate Strategy & Performance

Business & Finance

CS01-02/18      Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 30 November 2017

File Ref:                                               25974 – 17/413414

Responsible Officer:                            Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 30 November 2017.

Background

In accordance with Local Government Regulations, the Financial Activity Statement has been prepared in compliance with the following:

 

1.       Regulation 34(1) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to prepare a statement of financial activity each month, presented according to nature and type, by program, or by business unit.  For the 2017/18 financial year the statement of financial activity will be presented by nature and type.

 

2.       Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to adopt a percentage or value, calculated in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, to be used in statements of financial activity for reporting material variances.  For the 2017/18 financial year 10% and a value greater than $100,000 will be used for the reporting of variances.

Detail

Summary

 

OVERALL SUMMARY OF CURRENT MONTH FINANCIAL FIGURES

 


 

Result from Operations

 

 

 

Capital Program

 

 

OVERALL COMMENTS ON YEAR-TO-DATE (YTD) FIGURES

 

Result from Operations

 

 

Capital Program Progress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment Portfolio Performance

 

 

DETAILED ANALYSIS OF STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (ATTACHMENT 1)

 

Comments relating to the Statement of Comprehensive Income are provided under the following two sections:

a)      Current month comparison of actuals to budgets, and

b)      Year to date and end of year comparison of actuals to budgets.

 

 

a)      Current Month Comparison of Actuals to Budgets

The below table highlights the operating performance for the current month and identifies variances of actual to budget for each category of Revenue & Expense. 

 

 

 

Total Comprehensive Income

A favourable variance of +$180K was observed in November.  The larger contributor of the favourable variance was Operating Grants, Subsidies & Contributions which relates to payments from the Department of Communities for the upgrades of community centres (+$300K).  Some components for these grants are capital in nature and will be rectified in mid-year review.  There was also an invoice raised to the Department of Fire and Emergency Services for the Two Rocks Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Facilities (+$204K).  Town Planning Scheme Revenue however offset the favourable variance through a reversal of a previous month invoice due to a developer deferring contribution through a deed.  Town Planning Scheme Expenses also showed an unfavourable variance due to a final payment relating to a matter recently settled in the Supreme Court (-$458K).

 

Depreciation resulted in a favourable variance (+$504K) for the month of November.  A large number of plant items have reached their minimum written down values and have not been replaced when compared to the Long Term Financial Plan, and as a consequence are not depreciable.  It is noted that the depreciation budget was based on the Long Term Financial Plan.

 

Employee expenses also presented an unfavourable outcome for November through lower recognition of utilised annual leave resulting in an increased provision balance.  Higher temporary personnel expenses (-$138K) across a large number of service units have also contributed to the unfavourable variance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      Year to Date and End of Year Comparison of Actuals to Budgets

 

 

Details for the variances are outlined below.

 

Operating Revenues

 

Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions (Actual $5.8m, Revised Budget $4.4m)

 

The positive variance to November relates to payments from the Department of Communities for the upgrades of Girrawheen Seniors Community Hall and Clarkson Youth Centre.  There was also an invoice raised to the Department of Fire and Emergency Services for the Two Rocks Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Facilities which was not included the revised budget.  Additionally the first two instalments for the 2017/18 Financial Assistance Grant from the State Government was higher than budgeted.  There was also a grant received in August from the Department of Education for school oval maintenance which was not anticipated to be received until the end of the financial year.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Materials and Contracts (Actual $19.7m, Revised Budget $24.6m)

 

The majority of the favourable variance relates to lower contract expenses in Parks Maintenance and Assets Maintenance.  The contract expenses in these areas have been budgeted on an assumption of equal expenditure throughout the year however seasonal weather changes have resulted in the reduction of maintenance requirements to November.  Whilst a majority of these costs are attributable to Parks and Assets maintenance it is noted that a number of service units that incur these costs and are below budget.  Contract expenses for the following units make up +$779K of favourable variance: Advocacy and Economic Development, Waste Services, Communications, Marketing and Events, Customer and Information Services, Construction Services, People and Culture, Emergency Management and Safety Services, Hospitality, Transactional Finance, Property Services, Building Services, Aquamotion, Place Activation and Cultural Development.

 

In Engineering Maintenance there are a number of seasonal work programmes that have only recently commenced including jetting (+600K), road patching works (+$100K) and beach cleaning activities (+75K).

 

Within building maintenance  a number of programmes/contracts which are yet to take place including pest control, electrical compliance testing and asbestos inspections.  There is also a number of new buildings such as the Civic Centre Extension, the Yanchep Surf Life Saving club building and leased sites which will become the City’s responsibility later in the financial year.  These responsibilities include building maintenance, water consumption, fire testing, controlled waste and pest control.

 

Within Parks and Conservation Management underspend is primarily related to the timing of weed control that is based on programmed schedules.  It is noted that the post fire weed control program will be reduced due to a reduction of control burns.  The underspend is also related to works not yet commenced in the areas of streetscape and tree watering contracted works, ongoing turf renovations, Irrigation maintenance/repairs and beach cleaning due to wet winter as well as a late summer.  Additionally the sand renourishment program (+$250K) will not be due until April 2018.

 

Refuse removal expenses were also lower than budgeted due to a late invoice relating to Mindarie Regional Council tip fees being receipted after the November close off.

 

Consulting fee expenses for year to date to November were also lower than budgeted reflecting lower requirements than anticipated.

 

Depreciation (Actual $16.3m, Revised Budget $18.7m)

 

Depreciation presented a favourable variance to November (+$2.5m).  This is a result of the asset system being rolled over with new revaluations recorded.  It is noted that a large number of plant items have reached their written down value and have not been replaced, a greater portion of infrastructure assets are not depreciable than originally forecast with the Long Term Financial Plan.  Depreciation budgets will be reassessed during the mid-year review process to align budgets with new asset values allowing a more accurate depreciation expense calculation on a monthly basis.

 

Insurance Expenses (Actual $0.6m, Revised Budget $0.7m)

 

The favourable result for November is due to annual premiums being lower than budgeted.

 

Other Revenue & Expenses

 

Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions (Actual $3.4m, Revised Budget $6.5m)

The unfavourable variance is related to expected grants yet to be received.  The majority of receipts are awarded on progress of capital works projects. 

 

 

 

Contributed Physical Assets (Actual $0.0m, Revised Budget $25.0m)

The year to November resulted in an adverse variance due to no recognition of contributed assets from developers.  Further discussions are taking place between relevant service units to ascertain information required to provide reasonable quarterly estimates on the contributed assets. 

 

Profit / Loss on Asset Disposals (Actual $1.2m, Revised Budget $208K)

 

The favourable variance is a result of Tamala Park Regional Council land sales.  The sale proceeds were recognised in November while the budget was built with the expectation to realise the sale in December. 

 

Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Income (Actual $12.6m, Revised Budget $4.4m)

TPS Income had a positive variance to November due to revenue received relating to development at Nicholson Road and East Road not budgeted for this financial year.  Income related to lots 25/26 at Rangeview Road being recognised however not budgeted until 2021/22.  Finally there were contributions deferred by deed relating to Cell 9 however were repaid earlier than expected.

 

Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Expenses (Actual $8.9m, Revised Budget $1.3m)

The adverse variance to November largely relates to the 22 East Road development which was originally budgeted for 2016/17 however applications were received late leading to expenditure being recognised in the current financial year.  A final payment (-458K) relating to a legal matter settled via the Supreme Court has also contributed to the variance.

 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION (Attachment 2)

Net Current Assets

When compared to the opening position Net Current Assets have increased by $102.2m which largely reflects the timing of Rates receipts for 2017/18.

Current Receivables are mainly comprised of collectable Rates income ($55.2m).  The majority of the remaining current receivables relates to Sundry Debtor accounts ($3.7m) and Emergency Services Levy collections ($2.2m).

Non-Current Assets

Year to date Non-Current Assets have increased by $4.0m from 2016/17 actuals.  The movement is mainly the recognition of capital related works in progress.

Non-Current receivables largely relate to Deferred Pensioner Rebates; being funds that cannot be collected until the Pensioner ceases to reside at the rateable property.

Non-Current Liabilities

Year to date Non-Current Liabilities have increased by $2.8m which is mainly attributed to a draw down on the new loan facility for the Yanchep DCP.  The existing loan with the Western Australia Treasury Corporation remains unchanged and when combined with the new loan make up 98% of total Non-Current Liabilities.

 

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

 

The table below presents data on relevant financial ratios, comparing the minimum standard expected as per the Department of Local Government, Sport & Cultural Industries status at the beginning of the financial year, and year to date figures.  An explanation of the purpose of each ratio is also provided together with commentary where a ratio does not meet the minimum standard (highlighted in Red).  A green highlight is used where the minimum standard is met or exceeded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAPITAL PROGRAM

 

The current status of the Capital Program is summarised below by Sub-Program category.

 

 

As at 30 November 2017 the City has outlaid $19.8m, which represents 23% of the revised $85.3m budget.  Currently the City has $20.6m of committed expenditure and is in the process of finalising procurement on a further $9.4m by the end of the calendar year.  Administration will work closely with the project managers to maintain delivery momentum.

 

During the calendar month of November, $5.1m was outlaid. Significant capital expenditure for works undertaken in November included:

·    $883K Civic Centre extension

·    $859K Road Resurfacing Program

·    $358K Mary Lindsay Homestead Building, Yanchep

·    $311K Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club

·    $244K Little Athletics Building Kingsway RSC

·    $164K Neaves Road Upgrade, Mariginiup

·    $166K New Playground Installations

·    $162K Yanchep District Sports Amenities Building

·    $115K Kingsway Stage 3 Traffic Treatments

·    $114K Parks Asset Renewal Program

·    $111K Building Assets Renewal Program

·    $106K Ridgewood Reserve Sports Amenities Building

·    $104K Yanchep District Playing Fields

 

Significant (LTD) commitments remaining in the capital works program as at 30 November included:

·    $4.2m – Civic Centre Extension

·    $2.5m – Banksia Grove Sports Ground, Banksia Grove

·    $2.0m – Quinns Rocks Beach Coastal Protection Works

·    $1.4m – Vehicle Replacement - Waste Management (Domestic)

·    $1.2m – Upgrade Mirrabooka Avenue, Darch/Landsdale

·    $900K – Road Resurfacing Program

·    $500K – Irrigation Infrastructure Replacement Program

·    $500K – Kingsway Stage 3 Traffic Treatments         

 

Projects that were in advanced stages of procurement and likely to be finalised by end of the calendar year included:

·    $2.5m – Kingsway Olympic Clubrooms

·    $1.0m – Marangaroo Golf Course Irrigation Replacement

·    $900K – Park Assets Renewal

·    $500K – Aquamotion Changerooms Refurbishment

·    $620K – Marmion Avenue Dualling – Design

·    $600K – Neerabup Industrial Area Sewerage and Water Main Upgrade

·    $600K – Grandis Park Skate Park

·    $250K – Kingsway Cricket Club Turf Wicket Replacement

·    $200K – Peace Park, Koondoola

·    $200K – Yanchep District Playing Field Playground

 

As at 30 November 2017, the City has outlaid $9.2m (74%) of the $12.4m adjusted carry forward budget from 2016/2017.

 

Significant commitments against carry forward projects included:

·    Domestic Waste Vehicle Replacement  – $1.3m

·    Motivation Drive, Wangara: Lot 9005 contaminated sites investigation/remediation – $175K

·    Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club - Pinjar Park Old Yanchep Road, contaminated sites – $201K

·    Develop Industrial Estate, Neerabup – $241K

·    Mary Lindsay Homestead Building – $642K

·    Mary Lindsay POS – $191K

·    Irrigation Replacement Program – $528K

·    City Entry Statements – $327K

 

To further expand on the Capital Works Program information above, key capital projects are selected to be specifically reported on, which are itemised in the Top Capital Projects attachment to this report (Attachment 3).

 

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO (Attachment 4)

 

In accordance with the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 (and per the City’s Investment Policy), the City invests solely in the following highly secured investments in Australian currency:

1.      Deposits with authorised deposit taking institutions and the Western Australian Treasury Corporation for a term not exceeding three years;

2.      Bonds that are guaranteed by the Commonwealth Government or a State or Territory for a term not exceeding three years.

 

As at the current month end, the City holds an investment portfolio (cash & cash equivalents) of $436.7m (Face Value), equating to $421.1m inclusive of accrued interest.  The City’s year to date investment portfolio return has exceeded the Bank Bill index benchmark by 0.89% pa (2.65% pa vs. 1.76% pa), however it is noted that Interest Earnings were budgeted at a 2.75% yield.

All investments undertaken have been to provide the City with the most effective return whilst also adhering to the internal investment policy.

 

RATE SETTING STATEMENT (Attachment 5)

 

The Rate Setting Statement represents a composite view of the finances of the City, identifying the movement in the Surplus/(Deficit) based on the Revenues (excluding Rates), Expenses, Capital Works and Funding Movements, resulting in the Rating Income required.  It is noted that the closing Surplus/(Deficit) will balance to the reconciliation of Net Current Assets Surplus/(Deficit) Carried Forward (detailed below).

 

Consultation

This document has been prepared in consultation with Responsible Officers for review and analysis.

Comment

The budget figures within this report incorporate approved budget amendments.

 

As per item 2 in Background, comments on material variances have been provided.

 

In reference to tables provided in the report, the following colours have been used to categorise three levels of variance:

·        Green >+10%,

·        Orange <+/-10%, and

·        Red >-10%.

Statutory Compliance

This monthly financial report complies with Section 6.4 of the Local Government Act 1995 and Regulations 33A and 34 of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “4     Civic Leadership

4.2    Good Governance

4.2.2 Provide responsible resource and planning management which recognises our significant future growth

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

·        Accounting Policy

·        Strategic Budget Policy

·        Investment Policy

 

Financial Implications

 

As outlined above and detailed in Attachments 1 – 5

Voting Requirement

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council RECEIVES the Financial Activity Statements and commentaries on variances to YTD Budget for the period ended 30 November 2017, consisting of:

1.      November 2017 YTD Actuals;

2.      November 2017 YTD Statement of Financial Position and Net Current Assets; and

3.      November 2017 YTD Material Financial Variance Notes

 

Attachments:

1.

November 2017 Statement of Comprehensive Income

17/427443

Minuted

2.

November 2017 Statement of Financial Position

17/427681

Minuted

3.

Top Projects 2017-18 - November 2017

16/151914[v21]

Minuted

4.

November 2017 Rate Setting Statement

17/427693

Minuted

5.

November 2017 Investment Report

17/420158

Minuted

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              184

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              192

CS02-02/18      Financial Activity Statement for the Period Ended 31 December 2017

File Ref:                                               25974 – 18/1516

Responsible Officer:                            Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       5         

 

Issue

To consider the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 December 2017.

Background

In accordance with Local Government Regulations, the Financial Activity Statement has been prepared in compliance with the following:

 

1.       Regulation 34(1) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to prepare a statement of financial activity each month, presented according to nature and type, by program, or by business unit.  For the 2017/18 financial year the statement of financial activity will be presented by nature and type.

 

2.       Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to adopt a percentage or value, calculated in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, to be used in statements of financial activity for reporting material variances.  For the 2017/18 financial year 10% and a value greater than $100,000 will be used for the reporting of variances.

Detail

Summary

 

OVERALL SUMMARY OF CURRENT MONTH FINANCIAL FIGURES

 

Result from Operations

 

 

Capital Program

 

 

OVERALL COMMENTS ON YEAR-TO-DATE (YTD) FIGURES

 

Result from Operations

 

 

Capital Program Progress

 

 

Investment Portfolio Performance

 

 

DETAILED ANALYSIS OF STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (ATTACHMENT 1)

 

Comments relating to the Statement of Comprehensive Income are provided under the following two sections:

a)      Current month comparison of actuals to budgets, and

b)      Year to date and end of year comparison of actuals to budgets.

 

 

a)      Current Month Comparison of Actuals to Budgets

The below table highlights the operating performance for the current month and identifies variances of actual to budget for each category of Revenue & Expense. 

 

 

Total Comprehensive Income

A favourable variance of +$3.3m was observed in December.  The larger contributor of the favourable variance was Town Planning Scheme expenses where lots 56 and 57 are no longer proceeding this financial year and resulted in a saving of approximately $5.2m in   expenditure. This was partially offset by Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies & Contributions resulting in an unfavourable variance due mainly to progress payments not being received in December. Some components for these grants are capital in nature and will be rectified in mid-year review.  Fees and charges also resulted in an adverse variance due to swim school bookings being budgeted for December ($180K) however not being recognised until the following month. Additional rubbish bin requests were also lower than expected. Within engineering maintenance we observed a favourable result due to seasonal weather conditions impacting on required works to be undertaken. Conservation maintenance reflected a favourable result which relates to the timing of weed control programs being delayed due to seasonal weather conditions. Parks maintenance also has delays in various programs due to weather conditions.

 

Depreciation resulted in a favourable variance (+$495K) for the month of December.  A large number of plant items have reached their minimum written down values and have not been replaced when compared to the Long Term Financial Plan, and as a consequence are not depreciable.  It is noted that the depreciation budget was based on the Long Term Financial Plan.

 

Employee expenses also presented an almost balanced position for December. Within these expenses the capital salary recoveries were slightly higher than budgeted contributing to the favourable variance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      Year to Date and End of Year Comparison of Actuals to Budgets

 

 

Details for the variances are outlined below.

 

 

Operating Revenues

 

Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions (Actual $5.9m, Revised Budget $4.6m)

 

The positive variance to December relates to payments from the Department of Communities for the upgrades of Girrawheen Seniors Community Hall and Clarkson Youth Centre.  There was also a receipt from the Department of Fire and Emergency Services relating to the Two Rocks Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Facilities which was not anticipated.  Additionally the first two instalments for the 2017/18 Financial Assistance Grant from the State Government was higher than budgeted.  There was also a grant received in August (+$213K) from the Department of Education for school oval maintenance which was not anticipated to be received until the end of the financial year.

 

Fees and Charges (Actual $7.6m, Revised Budget $8.6m)

 

The unfavourable variance relates to the reduction of facility user entry fees as well as the cancellation of swim school classes at some of the Cities recreational facilities. Additional rubbish bin requests have also been lower than expected which has resulted in reduced income to December. 

 

Operating Expenses

 

Materials and Contracts (Actual $24.2m, Revised Budget $29.8m)

 

The majority of the favourable variance relates to lower contract expenses in Parks Maintenance and Assets Maintenance.  The contract expenses in these areas have been budgeted on an assumption of equal expenditure throughout the year however seasonal weather changes have resulted in the reduction of maintenance requirements to December. 

Whilst a majority of these costs are attributable to Parks and Assets maintenance it is noted that a number of service units that incur these costs and are below budget.  Contract expenses for the following units make up +$940K of favourable variance: Advocacy and Economic Development, Customer and Information Services, People and Culture, Communications, Marketing and Events, Community Facilities, Emergency Management and Safety Services, Community Services, Health and Compliance Services and Infrastructure Capital Works.

 

Within Engineering Maintenance, contract expenses have been budgeted on an assumption of equal expenditure throughout the year however seasonal weather changes have resulted in some works commencing later than originally planned.

 

Other variances to note include:

 

Within Building Maintenance there are a number of new buildings and leased sites which will become the City’s responsibility later in the financial year which have resulted in the current underspend.

 

The year to date underspend in Conservation is primarily related to the timing of weed control throughout the year that is based on post fire weed control and programmed seasonal weed control schedules.  Whilst there is an underspend in the year to date actuals to December 2017, it is noted that the Commitments reflect that purchase orders have been raised for works to the end of the financial year.

 

The year to date underspend in Parks Maintenance reflects works not yet commenced in the areas of streetscape and tree watering contracted works, ongoing turf renovations, Irrigation maintenance/repairs, weed mitigation control and beach cleaning/sand renourishment.

 

Refuse removal expenses were also lower than budgeted due to a late invoice relating to Mindarie Regional Council tip fees being receipted after the December close off.

 

Consulting fee expenses for year to date to December were also lower than budgeted ($462K expenditure vs $1.0m budget) reflecting lower requirements than anticipated.

 

Depreciation (Actual $19.5m, Revised Budget $22.5m)

 

Depreciation presented a favourable variance to December (+$3.0m).  This is a result of the asset system being rolled over with new revaluations recorded.  It is noted that a large number of plant items have reached their written down value and have not been replaced, a greater portion of infrastructure assets are not depreciable than originally forecast with the Long Term Financial Plan.  Depreciation budgets will be reassessed during the mid-year review process to align budgets with new asset values allowing a more accurate depreciation expense calculation on a monthly basis.

 

Insurance Expenses (Actual $0.7m, Revised Budget $0.8m)

 

The favourable result for December is due to annual premiums being lower than budgeted.

 

Other Revenue & Expenses

 

Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions (Actual $3.5m, Revised Budget $7.8m)

The unfavourable variance is related to expected grants yet to be received.  The majority of receipts are awarded on progress of capital works projects. 

 

Contributed Physical Assets (Actual $0.0m, Revised Budget $25.0m)

The year to December resulted in an adverse variance due to no recognition of contributed assets from developers. Discussions have continued between relevant service units to ascertain information required to provide reasonable estimates on the contributed assets. As a result it has been determined that estimates will be recorded when practical completion of developments have been received from developers. 

 

Profit / Loss on Asset Disposals (Actual $1.3m, Revised Budget $0.5m)

 

The favourable variance is a result of Tamala Park Regional Council land sales.  The sale proceeds have been higher than advised during the budget development. The forecast for the remaining financial year will be reviewed as part of the Mid Year Review. 

 

Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Income (Actual $13.9m, Revised Budget $6.4m)

TPS Income had a positive variance to December due to revenue received relating to development at Nicholson Road and East Road not budgeted for this financial year.  Income related to lots 25/26 at Rangeview Road being recognised however not budgeted until 2021/22.  Finally there were contributions deferred by deed relating to Cell 9 however were repaid earlier than expected.

 

Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Expenses (Actual $9.7m, Revised Budget $6.5m)

The adverse variance to December largely relates to the 22 East Road development which was originally budgeted for 2016/17 however applications were received late leading to expenditure being recognised in the current financial year.  It is also noted that the variance was offset by an underspend in Cell 9 due to lots 56 and 57 no longer proceeding this financial year.

 

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION (Attachment 2)

Net Current Assets

When compared to the opening position Net Current Assets have increased by $90.6m which largely reflects the timing of Rates receipts for 2017/18.

Current Receivables are mainly comprised of collectable Rates income ($46.5m).  The majority of the remaining current receivables relates to Sundry Debtor accounts ($2.7m) and Emergency Services Levy collections ($2.1m).

Non-Current Assets

Year to date Non-Current Assets have increased by $3.7m from 2016/17 actuals.  The movement is mainly the recognition of capital related works in progress.

Non-Current receivables largely relate to Deferred Pensioner Rebates; being funds that cannot be collected until the Pensioner ceases to reside at the rateable property.

Non-Current Liabilities

Year to date Non-Current Liabilities have increased by $2.7m which is mainly attributed to a draw down on the new loan facility for the Yanchep DCP.  The existing loan with the Western Australia Treasury Corporation remains unchanged and when combined with the new loan make up 98% of total Non-Current Liabilities.

 

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

 

The table below presents data on relevant financial ratios, comparing the minimum standard expected as per the Department of Local Government, Sport & Cultural Industries status at the beginning of the financial year, and year to date figures.  An explanation of the purpose of each ratio is also provided together with commentary where a ratio does not meet the minimum standard (highlighted in Red).  A green highlight is used where the minimum standard is met or exceeded.

 

 

 

 

 

CAPITAL PROGRAM

 

The current status of the Capital Program is summarised below by Sub-Program category.

 

 

 

As at 31 December 2017 the City has outlaid $23.1m, which represents 27% of the revised $85.3m budget. The City had $18.4m of committed expenditure to the end of December.

 

During the calendar month of December $3.5m was outlaid. Significant capital expenditure for works undertaken in December included:

 

·        $561K Road Resurfacing Program

·        $375K Banksia Grove Sports Ground

·        $299K Civic Centre extension

·        $199K Quinns Rocks Beach Coastal Protection Works

·        $155K Old Yanchep Road

·        $142K Develop Neerabup Industrial Estate

·        $126K Building Assets Renewal Program

·        $97K Mary Lindsay Homestead Building

$2.0m Total

 

 

Significant (LTD) commitments in the capital works program as at 31st December included:

 

·        $4.0m – Civic Centre Extension

·        $2.1m – Banksia Grove Sports Ground, Banksia Grove,

·        $1.8m – Quinns Rocks Beach Coastal Protection Works,

·        $1.4m – Vehicle Replacement - Waste Management (Domestic

·        $1.2m – Upgrade Mirrabooka Ave, Darch/Landsdale

·        $0.6m – Mary Lindsay Homestead Building, Yanchep

·        $0.5m – Irrigation Infrastructure Replacement Program

·        $0.5m – Kingsway Stage 3 Traffic Treatments

$12.1m Total

 

As at 31 December 2017, the City had outlaid $10.5m (85%) of the $12.4m adjusted carry forward budget from 2016/2017.

 

Significant commitments against carry forward projects included: 

 

·        $2.1m - Banksia Grove Sports Ground

·        $1.4m  - Domestic Waste Vehicle Replacement

·        $627K - Mary Lindsay Homestead Building

·        $534K - Irrigation Replacement Program

·        $360K – Little Athletics Building, Kingsway RSC

·        $355K – Floodlighting for eastern netball courts, Kingsway Netball Facility

·        $331K – Parks Asset Renewal Program

·        $252K  - City Entry Statements

$6.0m Total

 

To further expand on the Capital Works Program information above, key capital projects are selected to be specifically reported on, which are itemised in the Top Capital Projects attachment to this report (Attachment 3).

 

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO (Attachment 4)

 

In accordance with the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 (and per the City’s Investment Policy), the City invests solely in the following highly secured investments in Australian currency:

1.      Deposits with authorised deposit taking institutions and the Western Australian Treasury Corporation for a term not exceeding three years;

2.      Bonds that are guaranteed by the Commonwealth Government or a State or Territory for a term not exceeding three years.

 

As at the current month end, the City holds an investment portfolio (cash & cash equivalents) of $405.5m (Face Value), equating to $410.2m inclusive of accrued interest.  The City’s year to date investment portfolio return has exceeded the Bank Bill index benchmark by 0.88% pa (2.64% pa vs. 1.76% pa), however it is noted that Interest Earnings were budgeted at a 2.75% yield.

All investments undertaken have been to provide the City with the most effective return whilst also adhering to the internal investment policy.

 

RATE SETTING STATEMENT (Attachment 5)

 

The Rate Setting Statement represents a composite view of the finances of the City, identifying the movement in the Surplus/(Deficit) based on the Revenues (excluding Rates), Expenses, Capital Works and Funding Movements, resulting in the Rating Income required.  It is noted that the closing Surplus/(Deficit) will balance to the reconciliation of Net Current Assets Surplus/(Deficit) Carried Forward (detailed below).

 

Consultation

This document has been prepared in consultation with Responsible Officers for review and analysis.

Comment

The budget figures within this report incorporate approved budget amendments.

 

As per item 2 in Background, comments on material variances have been provided.

 

In reference to tables provided in the report, the following colours have been used to categorise three levels of variance:

·        Green >+10%,

·        Orange <+/-10%, and

·        Red >-10%.

Statutory Compliance

This monthly financial report complies with Section 6.4 of the Local Government Act 1995 and Regulations 33A and 34 of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “4     Civic Leadership

4.2    Good Governance

4.2.2 Provide responsible resource and planning management which recognises our significant future growth

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

·        Accounting Policy

·        Strategic Budget Policy

·        Investment Policy

 

Financial Implications

 

As outlined above and detailed in Attachments 1 – 5

Voting Requirement

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council RECEIVES the Financial Activity Statements and commentaries on variances to YTD Budget for the period ended 31 December 2017, consisting of:

1.      December 2017 YTD Actuals;

2.      December 2017 YTD Statement of Financial Position and Net Current Assets; and

3.      December 2017 YTD Material Financial Variance Notes

 

Attachments:

1.

Statement of Comprehensive Income December 2017

18/6785

Minuted

2.

Statement of Financial Position December 2017

18/6787

Minuted

3.

Top Projects 2017-18 - December 2017 - 20180116

16/151914[v22]

Minuted

4.

Rate Setting statement December 2017

18/6788

Minuted

5.

Investments December 2017

18/6792

Minuted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              210


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              211

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Ordinary Council Meeting 06 February, 2018                                              217

 

Transactional Finance

CS03-02/18      Warrant of Payments for the Period to 30 November 2017

File Ref:                                               1859 – 17/421971

Responsible Officer:                            Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil         

 

Issue

Presentation to the Council of a list of accounts paid during the month of November 2017, including a statement as to the total amounts outstanding at the end of the month.

Background

Local Governments are required each month to prepare a list of accounts paid for that month and submit the list to the next Ordinary Meeting of the Council.

 

In addition, it must record all other outstanding accounts and include that amount with the list to be presented.  The list of accounts paid and the total of outstanding accounts must be recorded in the minutes of the Council meeting.

Detail

The following is the Summary of Accounts paid in November 2017:

 

Funds

Vouchers

Amount

Director Corporate Services Advance A/C

Accounts Paid – November 2017

   Cheque Numbers

   EFT Document Numbers

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

Less Cancelled Cheques

Town Planning Scheme

Manual Journal

RECOUP FROM MUNICIPAL FUND

 

 

110929 - 111274

3054 - 3081

 

 

$941,155.91

$13,408,180.53

$14,349,336.44

 

($4,693.80)

 ($463,495.58)

($20,966.41)

$13,860,180.65

Municipal Fund – Bank A/C

Accounts Paid – November 2017

Municipal Recoup

Direct Payments

Payroll – Direct Debits

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

 

 

$13,860,180.65

$35,951.50

$3,593,553.87

$17,849,686.02

Town Planning Scheme

Accounts Paid – November 2017

                           Cell 5

                           Cell 7

                           Cell 8

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

 

 

 

$148,766.19

$5,753.40

$308,975.99

$463,495.58

 

At the close of November 2017 outstanding creditors amounted to $1,811,865.99.

Consultation

Nil

Comment

The list of payment (cheques and electronic transfers) and the end of month total of outstanding creditors for the month of November 2017 is presented to the Council for information and recording in the minutes of the meeting, as required by the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

Statutory Compliance

Regulation 13(1) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 requires a local government to list the accounts paid each month and total all outstanding creditors at the month end and present such information to the Council at its next Ordinary Meeting after each preparation.  A further requirement of this Section is that the prepared list must be recorded in the minutes of the Council meeting.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2023:

 “4     Civic Leadership

4.3    Progressive Organisation

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Warrant of Payments Information Only

Low

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Transactional Finance Manager

Accept

 

“There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.”

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council RECEIVES the list of payments drawn for the month of November 2017, as summarised below:-

 

Funds

Vouchers

Amount

Director Corporate Services Advance A/C

Accounts Paid – November 2017

   Cheque Numbers

   EFT Document Numbers

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

Less Cancelled Cheques

Town Planning Scheme

Manual Journal

RECOUP FROM MUNICIPAL FUND

 

 

110929 - 111274

3054 - 3081

 

 

$941,155.91

$13,408,180.53

$14,349,336.44

 

($4,693.80)

 ($463,495.58)

($20,966.41)

$13,860,180.65

Municipal Fund – Bank A/C

Accounts Paid – November 2017

Municipal Recoup

Direct Payments

Payroll – Direct Debits

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

 

 

$13,860,180.65

$35,951.50

$3,593,553.87

$17,849,686.02

Town Planning Scheme

Accounts Paid – November 2017

                           Cell 5

                           Cell 7

                           Cell 8

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

 

 

 

$148,766.19

$5,753.40

$308,975.99

$463,495.58

 

WARRANT OF PAYMENTS NOVEMBER 2017

 

 

 

 

PAYMENT

DATE

DESCRIPTION

AMOUNT

00110929

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$792.84

00110930

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$548.38

00110931

01/11/2017

James Millward 

$1,000.00

 

 

  Refund - Verge Bond Overpayment

 

00110932

01/11/2017

Suzanne Imrie 

$100.00

 

 

  Refund - Verge Bond Overpayment

 

00110933

01/11/2017

Ivan Pantic 

$100.00

 

 

  Refund - Verge Bond Overpayment

 

00110934

01/11/2017

R. Outred 

$360.00

 

 

  Vehicle Crossing Subsidy

 

00110935

01/11/2017

D Patel 

$360.00

 

 

  Vehicle Crossing Subsidy

 

00110936

01/11/2017

Yanchep Two Rocks Community Recreation Association Incorporated

$3,000.00

 

 

  Donation - Christmas In The Park - Charnwood Park - 9 December 2017

 

00110937

01/11/2017

Vicki Angage 

$100.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110938

01/11/2017

Wanneroo Civic Choir Incorporated 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110939

01/11/2017

Kevin Francis 

$850.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110940

01/11/2017

Jessica Dabasia 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110941

01/11/2017

Steven Evans 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110942

01/11/2017

Jitesh Bhudia 

$850.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110943

01/11/2017

Australia Karen Organization WA Incorporated 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110944

01/11/2017

Stephanie Grossetti 

$100.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110945

01/11/2017

Vishva Hindu Parishad of Australia 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110946

01/11/2017

Yanchep Districts Junior Football Club 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110947

01/11/2017

Tracey Going 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110948

01/11/2017

M Thompson & L Malynn 

$400.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110949

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$259.09

00110950

01/11/2017

MiLi Markets 

$342.00

 

 

  Refund - Deposit On Room Hire - Booking Cancelled - Cultural Development

 

00110951

01/11/2017

MiLi Markets 

$500.00

 

 

  Refund - Deposit On Room Hire - Booking Cancelled - Cultural Development

 

00110952

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$394.99

00110953

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$789.61

00110954

01/11/2017

Stirling Skills Training Incorporated 

$154.00

 

 

  Refund - Hire Fees - Re-Issue Of Stale Cheque

 

00110955

01/11/2017

Perth Concrete Pools 

$156.65

 

 

  Refund - Building Services Levy - Overpayment - Re-Issue Of Stale Cheque

 

00110956

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$1,677.90

00110957

01/11/2017

Tatum-Clio Doran 

$360.00

 

 

  Vehicle Crossing Subsidy

 

00110958

01/11/2017

The Smith Family 

$3,300.00

 

 

  Community Funding - Christmas Celebration At Roseworth Primary School 10.12.2017

 

00110959

01/11/2017

Classic Home and Garage Innovations 

$432.00

 

 

  Refund - Development Application - Not Required

 

00110960

01/11/2017

Celebration Homes Pty Ltd 

$73.00

 

 

  Refund - Planning Fees - Cancelled

 

00110961

01/11/2017

K. McAuliffe 

$100.00

 

 

  Refund - Infringement Notice Partially Paid

 

00110962

01/11/2017

T Mosscrop 

$60.00

 

 

  Dog Registration Refund - Deceased

 

00110963

01/11/2017

J Dohler 

$77.50

 

 

  Dog Registration Refund - Sterilisation

 

00110964

01/11/2017

I Webster 

$77.50

 

 

  Dog Registration Refund - Sterilised

 

00110965

01/11/2017

L Walker 

$75.00

 

 

  Dog Registration Refund - Sterilisation

 

00110966

01/11/2017

Owen Santa Maria 

$360.00

 

 

  Vehicle Crossing Subsidy

 

00110967

01/11/2017

Ashleigh Lawrence 

$99.52

 

 

  Refund - Swimming Lessons - Cancelled

 

00110968

01/11/2017

M Maxwell 

$97.70

 

 

  Refund - Building Application Fee - Not Required

 

00110969

01/11/2017

Alkimos Seahawks AFL Club 

$850.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110970

01/11/2017

Sami Nayeem 

$84.00

 

 

  Key Bond Refund

 

00110971

01/11/2017

Romeo Reeder 

$84.00

 

 

  Key Bond Refund

 

00110972

01/11/2017

Balga Cricket Club 

$84.00

 

 

  Key Bond Refund

 

00110973

01/11/2017

Romeo Reeder 

$84.00

 

 

  Key Bond Refund

 

00110974

01/11/2017

Claire Hobson 

$57.05

 

 

  Refund Hire Fees

 

00110975

01/11/2017

Shirni Yati Shah 

$540.00

 

 

  Bond Refund

 

00110976

01/11/2017

Melanie Jarman & Sandy Jarman 

$360.00

 

 

  Vehicle Crossing Subsidy

 

00110977

01/11/2017

Cassandra Tyler 

$360.00

 

 

  Vehicle Crossing Subsidy

 

00110978

01/11/2017

True North Church 

$3,300.00

 

 

  Community Funding Program - Carols On The Green 2017

 

00110979

01/11/2017

Julie Elizabeth Ayre 

$12.50

 

 

  Refund - Swimming Lessons Cancelled - Term 3 2017

 

00110980

01/11/2017

TPG + Place Match 

$196.00

 

 

  Reimbursement - Development Application JDAP Fee - Assessed By The City

 

00110981

01/11/2017

Wanneroo Secondary College 

$400.00

 

 

  Bond Refund - Gallery

 

00110982

01/11/2017

Satterley Property Group

$181.10

 

 

  Refund - Partial Refund Of Fees Not Expended Processing Amendment No. 2 To The Jindalee North Agreed Structure Plan No 88

 

00110983

01/11/2017

Rates Refund

$3.45

00110984

01/11/2017

Homebuyers Centre Pty Ltd 

$4,000.00

 

 

  Refund - Street & Verge Bond

 

00110985

01/11/2017

JCORP Pty Ltd Trading As Impressions 

$2,000.00

 

 

  Refund - Street & Verge Bond

 

00110986

01/11/2017

Ventura Home Group Pty Ltd Trading As Smart Homes 

$2,000.00

 

 

  Refund - Street & Verge Bond

 

00110987

01/11/2017

Outdoor World Wangara 

$2,000.00

 

 

  Refund - Street & Verge Bond