Proof_CouncilAgenda_Coverpage_Template_Governance

 

 

 

 

 

 

BRIEFING PAPERS

FOR ELECTED MEMBERS’

BRIEFING SESSION

 

Draft Only

 

 

 

 

 

to be held at

the Council Chambers (Level 1), Civic Centre,

23 Dundebar Road, Wanneroo

on 03 March 2020 commencing at 6:00pm


PROCEDURE FOR FULL COUNCIL BRIEFING

PRINCIPLES

A Council Briefing occurs a week prior to the Ordinary Council Meeting and provides an opportunity for Elected Members to ask questions and clarify issues relevant to the specific agenda items before council.  The briefing is not a decision-making forum and the Council has no power to make decisions.  The briefing session will not be used, except in an emergency, as a venue or forum through which to invoke the requirements of the Local Government Act 1995 and call a special meeting of Council.

 

In order to ensure full transparency the meetings will be open to the public to observe the process.  Where matters are of a confidential nature, they will be deferred to the conclusion of the briefing and at that point, the briefing session closed to the public.  The reports provided are the Officers’ professional opinions.  While it is acknowledged that Elected Members may raise issues that have not been considered in the formulation of the report and recommendation, it is a basic principle that as part of the briefing sessions Elected Members cannot direct Officers to change their reports or recommendations.

 

PROCESS

The briefing session will commence at 6.00 pm and will be chaired by the Mayor or in his/her absence the Deputy Mayor.  In the absence of both, Councillors will elect a chairperson from amongst those present.  In general, Standing Orders will apply, EXCEPT THAT Elected Members may speak more than once on any item, there is no moving or seconding items, Officers will address the Elected Members and the order of business will be as follows:-

 

Members of the public present may observe the process and there is an opportunity at the conclusion of the briefing for a public question time where members of the public may ask questions (no statements) relating only to the business on the agenda.   The agenda will take the form of:

Ø  Attendance and Apologies

Ø  Declarations of Interest

Ø  Reports for discussion

Ø  Tabled Items

Ø  Public Question Time

Ø  Closure

 

Where an interest is involved in relation to an item, the same procedure which applies to Ordinary Council meetings will apply.  It is a breach of the City’s Code of Conduct for an interest to not be declared.  The briefing session will consider items on the agenda only and proceed to deal with each item as they appear.  The process will be for the Mayor to call each item number in sequence and ask for questions.  Where there are no questions regarding the item, the briefing will proceed to the next item.

 

AGENDA CONTENTS

While every endeavour is made to ensure that all items to be presented to Council at the Ordinary Council Meeting are included in the briefing papers, it should be noted that there will be occasions when, due to necessity, items will not be ready in time for the briefing session and will go straight to the Full Council agenda as a matter for decision.  Further, there will be occasions when items are TABLED at the briefing rather than the full report being provided in advance.  In these instances, staff will endeavour to include the item on the agenda as a late item, noting that a report will be tabled at the agenda briefing session.

 

AGENDA DISTRIBUTION

The Council Briefing agenda will be distributed to Elected Members on the FRIDAY prior to the Council Briefing session.  Copies will be made available to the libraries and the Internet for interested members of the public.  Spare briefing papers will be available at the briefing session for interested members of the public.

 

DEPUTATIONS

Deputations will generally not be heard prior to the Council Briefing session and are reserved for prior to the Ordinary Council meeting.

 

RECORD OF BRIEFING

The formal record of the Council Briefing session will be limited to notes regarding any agreed action to be taken by staff or Elected Members.  No recommendations will be included and the notes will be retained for reference and are not distributed to Elected Members or the public. 

 

LOCATION

The Council Briefing session will take place in the Council Chamber in the Civic Centre.


COMMONLY USED aCRONYMS AND THEIR mEANING

Acronym

Meaning

 

 

ABN

Australian Business Number

 

 

ACN

Australian Company Number

 

 

Act

Local Government Act 1995

 

 

CBP

City of Wanneroo Corporate Business Plan

 

 

CHRMAP

Coastal Hazard Risk Management & Adaption Plan

 

 

City

City of Wanneroo

 

 

CPI

Consumer Price Index

 

 

DBCA

Department of Biodiversity Conservation and Attractions

 

 

DFES

Department of Fire and Emergency Services

 

 

DOE

Department of Education Western Australia

 

 

DOH

Department of Health

 

 

DPLH

Department of Planning Lands and Heritage

 

 

DPS2

District Planning Scheme No. 2

 

 

DLGSCI

Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

 

 

DWER

Department of Water and Environmental Regulation

 

 

EPA

Environmental Protection Authority

 

 

GST

Goods and Services Tax

 

 

JDAP

Joint Development Assessment Panel

 

 

LTFP

Long Term Financial Plan

 

 

MRS

Metropolitan Region Scheme

 

 

MRWA

Main Roads Western Australia

 

 

POS

Public Open Space

 

 

PTA

Public Transport Authority of Western Australia

 

 

SAT

State Administrative Tribunal

 

 

SCP

City of Wanneroo Strategic Community Plan

 

 

WALGA

Western Australian Local Government Association

 

 

WAPC

Western Australian Planning Commission

 


 

 

 

Briefing Papers for Tuesday 3 March, 2020

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Item  1_____ Attendances_ 1

Item  2_____ Apologies and Leave of Absence_ 1

Item  3_____ Reports_ 1

Planning & Sustainability  1

Strategic Land Use Planning & Environment  1

3.1                         Petition PQ01-10/19 "Request for the City of Wanneroo to Declare a Climate Emergency" 1

3.2                         Review of Local Planning Policy 3.3: Fauna Management  10

3.3                         Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan - Annual Review of Costs  19

3.4                         Draft WA Aviation Strategy 2020  41

Approval Services  44

3.5                         Consideration of Amendment No. 4 to the East Wanneroo Cell 3 Approved Structure Plan No. 5  44

3.6                         Local Planning Policies  71

Assets  84

Infrastructure Capital Works  84

3.7                         Tender No 19192 - Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building Construction  84

Waste Services  93

3.8                         Better Bins Funding Agreement  93

Community & Place  116

Community Facilities  116

3.9                         Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan  116

3.10                      Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review   131

3.11                      Outcomes of the 2019 Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund  180

3.12                      Hinckley Park, Hocking - Outcomes of Community Consultation  184

Corporate Strategy & Performance  204

Business & Finance  204

3.13                      Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 January 2020  204

Transactional Finance  233

3.14                      Warrant of Payments for the Period to 31 January 2020  233

Council & Corporate Support  296

3.15                      Donations to be Considered by Council - March 2020  296

Chief Executive Office  303

Governance & Legal  303

3.16                      Compliance Audit Return 2019  303

3.17                      Extension of Review Dates for Council Policies  320

3.18                      Internal Audit of Regulation 17 (2019) by William Buck  324

Item  4_____ Motions on Notice_ 350

Item  5_____ Late Reports (to be circulated under separate cover) 350

Item  6_____ Public Question Time_ 350

Item  7_____ Confidential_ 350

7.1                         Appointment of Acting Chief Executive Officer  350

Item  8_____ Date of Next Meeting_ 350

Item  9_____ Closure_ 350

 


Agenda

 

Good evening Councillors, staff, ladies and gentlemen, we wish to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land we are meeting on, the Whadjuk people.  We would like to pay respect to the Elders of the Nyoongar nation, past and present, who have walked and cared for the land and we acknowledge and respect their continuing culture and the contributions made to the life of this city and this region.

Item  1      Attendances

Item  2      Apologies and Leave of Absence

Item  3      Reports

Declarations of Interest by Elected Members, including the nature and extent of the interest. Declaration of Interest forms to be completed and handed to the Chief Executive Officer.

Planning & Sustainability

Strategic Land Use Planning & Environment

3.1    Petition PQ01-10/19 "Request for the City of Wanneroo to Declare a Climate Emergency"

File Ref:                                              26259 – 19/421108

Responsible Officer:                           A/Director Planning & Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

The City received a petition requesting the Council to declare a climate emergency.

Background

On 9 October 2019, the City received a petition submitted by a secondary school student, including six signatures and a list of 733 electronic petition signatures, as well as four letters addressed to Mayor Tracy Roberts in support of the petition. The petition was formally received at Ordinary Council Meeting held on 15 October 2019.

This initiative arises from a global movement where 1,191 jurisdictions in 24 countries have declared a climate emergency. Populations covered by jurisdictions that have declared a climate emergency amount to 290 million citizens, with 18.3% of these living in the United Kingdom. A scientific paper declaring a climate emergency has been signed by more than 11,000 scientists around the world. The paper published in the journal BioScience states, that “planet Earth is clearly and unequivocally facing a climate emergency”. The paper highlights the issue of inaction in relation to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the consequent impacts on climate, environment and the society. Despite the 1997 Kyoto Protocol and 2015 Paris Agreement GHG emissions are still raising.

Detail

The petition states that “by declaring a climate emergency, it would highlight that climate change is real and demonstrate that Council is willing to commit and work towards fighting one of the biggest threats against humanity”

 

The petition raises issues in relation to impacts of climate change and the need to take action to mitigate those. It requests the City to undertake the following initiatives:

 

·     More support for climate events (encourage people to attend climate strikes, i.e. Student Strike 4 Climate);

·     Renewing and strengthening our commitment to climate action in reference with the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy (increase targets and threat levels);

·     Helping in the education of youth about climate change and how they can help (more visits and programs ensuring the youth are educated on this crisis);

·     Encouraging more public transport, walking, riding and reducing electricity use (benefits of catching public transport, for the environment); and

·     An increase in climate propaganda, (social networks and presence at local areas such as shopping malls – climate change posters).

 

In Western Australia, a number of local governments have declared a climate emergency, including the City of Fremantle, City of Swan, City of Vincent, Town of Victoria Park, Shire of Denmark, Augusta-Margaret River Shire Council and Shire of Mundaring.

 

A significant number of local governments from across Western Australia have committed to the Western Australian Local Government Association’s (WALGA) Climate Change Declaration that demonstrates their acknowledgment of the impacts of climate change and their commitment to developing locally appropriate mitigation and adaptation strategies to manage climate change. To date, 40 Local Governments have signed the Declaration, representing 65% of the State’s population. According to WALGA, becoming a signatory of the declaration will further support WALGA to advocate for the appropriate funding and development of legislative mechanisms to support Local Government climate change management.

 

Recently, the Australian Medical Association joined other health organisations around the world including the American Medical Association, the British Medical Association, and Doctors for the Environment Australia in recognising climate change as a health emergency.

 

The City is actively responding to the issue of climate change on many fronts that it has jurisdiction over and is addressing most of the initiatives requested by the petition.  This includes the preparation and implementation of a number of strategies, policies and action plans relating directly or indirectly to mitigating factors contributing to climate change.

 

In line with the City’s Strategic Community Plan outcomes relating to Resource Management (i.e. minimise impacts of climate change; seek alternative ways to improve energy efficiency; and proactively manage the scarcity of water through sustainable local water management strategies), on 24 September 2019 Council adopted its Environment Policy. The Policy is the City’s commitment to protecting and enhancing its natural environment and incorporating the principles of ecologically sustainable development throughout its operations.  The Policy states Council’s commitment to address climate change including:

·    Protecting the natural environment from pollution and degradation that are within the City’s mandate and capability;

·    Enhancing the natural and built environment through strategic planning and responsible operations;

·    Aligning the City’s practices with sustainable development principles to encourage efficient use of resources, reduced waste generation and minimise the City’s corporate environmental footprint where practicable;

·    Adapting to the changing climate and where practical, minimising its contribution towards climate change;

·    Encouraging residents and businesses to implement ecologically sustainable practices;

·    Establish clear objectives, targets and indicators to monitor environmental performance and sustainable development; and

·    Incorporating a philosophy of continual improvement and innovation to ensure the City is responding appropriately to future growth, whilst improving its environmental performance and resource use over time.

As part of the City’s integrated and holistic approach to manage the environment and promote sustainability, including addressing the issue of climate change, the City is currently implementing a range of strategies and plans (see Attachment 1 for visual representation):

·     Local Environment Strategy - Encompasses biodiversity protection, waste reduction, liveability, energy reduction/efficiency, water availability/quality; and highlights the mitigation of climate change impacts and community preparedness to respond to climate change events;

·     Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy - Addresses urban heat, tree canopy, energy and water efficiency/reduction, and coastal monitoring;

·     Energy Reduction Plan - Addresses the reduction of energy use by the City’s operations which in turn will reduce emissions associated with climate change;

·     City’s Investment Policy - Council approved an amendment to the policy in April 2019 stating that in exercising its power of investment, preference is to be given to investments with institutions that have been assessed to have no current record of funding fossil fuels;

·     Water Conservation Plan & Waterwise Council Action Plan - focusses on reducing water use across the City’s operations, as well as community education;

·     Coastal Hazard Risk Management and Adaptation Plan - Identifies coastal risks associated with climate change impacts and how the City should respond to these.

·     Strategic Waste Management Plan 2016 - 2022 - Addresses waste reduction and recycling, including community education;

·     Bushfire Risk Management Plan - Planning to prevent negative outcomes from extreme weather events;

·     Environmental Management System - Ensures management processes identify measures to protect the environment including climate change impacts;

·     Transport Strategy 2019/20 - Ensuring the City creates a balanced and sustainable transport future, including increased public transport use; and

·     Wanneroo Cycle Plan 2018/19 - 2021/22 - Aims to create a cycle friendly environment which provides a credible alternative to car use.

Consultation

No consultation has been undertaken in this regard.

Comment

The City acknowledges the need to address climate change and already implements a number of initiatives relevant to the petition. However it is not recommended that the Council declares a climate emergency but to become a signatory to the WALGA Climate Change Declaration. This is a more credible and balanced mechanism to acknowledge the importance of climate change, whilst demonstrating a commitment to initiatives that will address climate change within the context of the jurisdiction and influence of local government.

 

WALGA Climate Change Declaration is a voluntary opportunity for Councils to demonstrate their commitment to locally appropriate climate change management, and to participate in a sector-wide leadership approach. Becoming a signatory of the WALGA Climate Change Declaration would involve the Mayor signing a declaration document such as the draft prepared (Attachment 2) based on the WALGA supplied template. WALGA encourages the template to be modified to suit each Local Government, and as such form part of the process of becoming a signatory. WALGA will provide a certificate for signing and display by the City.

 

In addition, the City will:

 

·    Continue implementing existing measures/plans to adapt to and mitigate climate change within City’s jurisdiction and ability, including the Waterwise Council Action Plan, Bushfire Risk Management Plan, Energy Reduction Plan and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy;

 

·    Continue improving emissions-related data collection and monitoring in order to allow for establishing baselines and monitor the progress;

 

·    Align existing and develop new action plans to achieve set targets by reducing energy and water use, decreasing fossil fuel use, and incorporating better urban design and building practices. This addresses petition point number 2 relating to renewing and strengthening the City’s commitment to climate action and the review of the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy;

·    Increase community education and awareness through joining the Sustainable Schools Alliance Program, improving website content, and join programs such as the 'City Power Partnership' program that makes public pledges on reducing carbon emissions indicating the City’s commitment towards climate change. These initiatives address petition points number 3 and number 5 relating to the education of youth about climate change, how they can help and climate related communication; and

 

·    Continue implementation of the City’s Transport Strategy 2019/20 and the Wanneroo Cycle Plan 2018/19 - 2021/22, which addresses petition point number 4 relating to encouragement of greater use of public transport, walking, and cycling.

It should be noted that target setting will require more research including finalisation of emissions-related data collection and monitoring process. Data collection process is in progress therefore additional work will only be required for target setting. Administration will report back to Council on the target setting approach recommended for the City. The City is also planning to undertake a review of the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy and the Energy Reduction Plan, which will incorporate the targets approved by the Council.

Becoming a signatory of the WALGA Climate Change Declaration will also provide leverage to the City when approaching State Government to obtain more support and funding for addressing the issues of climate change that are often State Government controlled but rest with LGA’s to implement. Example of these includes transport, fire risk mitigation and regional fire management, illegal clearing, and density and urban planning.

Following the recent bush fires locally and interstate, it is important to place additional emphasis on implementation of the City’s Bushfire Risk Management Plan to ensure the existent short-term risk to life and property is addressed. At the same time maintaining the focus on mitigating the impacts that are contributing to the cause is vital provided it is in jurisdiction and influence of local government.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Natural)

3.1    Resource Management

3.1.1  Minimise impacts of climate change

 

3.1.3  Proactively manage the scarcity of water through sustainable local water management strategies

3.2    Enhanced Environment

3.2.1  Maximise the environmental value of beaches nature reserves and parklands

3.2.2  Collaborate with relevant State agencies with a focus on the enhancement of the natural environment

4        Civic Leadership

4.1    Working with Others

4.1.1  Build effective partnerships and demonstrate leadership in local government at regional, state and national levels

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O22 Environmental Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Planning and Sustainability

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O23 Safety of Community

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Planning and Sustainability

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S05 Water Availability

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Planning and Sustainability

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S06 Climate Change

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Planning and Sustainability

Manage

 

The above risks relating to the issue contained within this report have been identified and considered within the City’s Strategic and Corporate risk registers. 

Policy Implications

Issues raised in this report align with the City’s Environment Policy which states Council’s commitment to adapt to changing climate and to minimise its contributions towards climate change. 

Financial Implications

In the event Council becomes a signatory to the WALGA Climate Change Declaration, it is expected there would minimal financial implications. Potential actions identified through the planned review of the existing Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy such as installation of additional solar photovoltaics on buildings would be considered under existing budgetary provisions or through the usual budget planning processes.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.       ENDORSES the City of Wanneroo becoming a signatory of the Western Australian Local Government Association Climate Change Declaration;

2.       NOTES the continuation of the City’s integrated approach to climate change through implementing existing measures to adapt to and mitigate climate change, within the City’s jurisdiction and ability, including the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategy, Energy Reduction Plan, and Waterwise Council Action Plan; and

3.       NOTES that the City will continue to improve data collection and management associated with greenhouse gas emissions to allow for setting baselines and targets and setup ongoing monitoring.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Diagram - Visual Representation of CoW approach to Climate Change

20/1391

 

2.

WALGA Climate Change Declaration - CoW draft wording

20/6586

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                                  7

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                13

3.2    Review of Local Planning Policy 3.3: Fauna Management

File Ref:                                              34620 – 19/481019

Responsible Officer:                           A/Director Planning & Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To consider the draft revised Local Planning Policy 3.3: Fauna Management (LPP 3.3) included as Attachment 1.

Background

At its meeting on 13 November 2018 Council resolved to adopt LPP 3.3 (Attachment 2). The Policy provides guidance on fauna management within development sites with a focus on macro-fauna such as kangaroos and emus.

 

LPP 3.3 has recently been subject to an unscheduled review due to lessons learned with the implementation of the Policy that have demonstrated the Policy may not be as effective as originally intended under some circumstances. The review focuses on providing further clarity to the operation of the policy, specifically with regards to fauna containment, fencing, and fauna management options. These proposed changes are minor and they are intended to improve the effectiveness of the Policy.

Detail

The structure, objectives and overall intentions of the draft revised Policy remain unchanged from the previous version. However, modifications are proposed to some of the policy provisions in Parts 1 and 2 to make the requirements of the Policy more clear to developers and land owners.

 

The key changes proposed to be made to LPP 3.3 are shown in Attachment 1 and are as follows:

 

Proposed changes to Part 1

 

·     One change is proposed in Part 1, which outlines the principles of responsible fauna management in response to development. Provision 1.2 is proposed to be amended to include the landowner alongside the developer as the parties responsible for proactive fauna management.

 

Proposed Changes to Part 2

 

·     Provision 2.2.2 in the revised LPP addresses fauna containment and fencing and has been moved higher up the list of provisions in this section in order to emphasise the importance of this step in fauna management and to ensure it is undertaken prior to any disturbance of the site. The provision has also been amended to more clearly specify the extent of fencing (that it is to encompass the land holding subject to development), as well as the duration for which the fencing is required to be present (i.e. across all stages of development).

 

·     A new provision 2.2.3 has been added, requiring that the fencing when installed, include appropriate signage to direct enquiries to the developer/landowner, and the DBCA concerning native fauna.

 

·     A new provision 2.2.4 has been added, explaining that developers and land owner must demonstrate that all available fauna management options have been considered. The intention of this provision is to reiterate the importance of seeking DBCA advice on all matters related to options for fauna management, and that this occurs early in the process.

 

·     Provision 2.2.6 (previously provision 2.2.3) has also been updated to reiterate the position of the DBCA, adding reference to management programs needing to be informed by advice provided by the DBCA.

 

·     Provision 2.2.8 (previously provision 2.2.5) and provision 2.2.10 (previously provision 2.2.7) are proposed to be removed as it is duplicating requirements of other provisions.

 

·     Provision 2.3 is proposed to be added to require fauna management actions to be undertaken as early as possible in the planning and development stages.

 

·     Provision 2.4 is now removed as this relates to operational procedures dealt with as appropriate.

Consultation

The Policy has been updated following consultation with relevant service units within the City.

 

Subclause 5(2) of the deemed provisions of DPS 2 states that modifications to Local Planning Policies that are considered to be minor in nature are not required to be publicly advertised. The amendments do not affect the objectives of the Policy and are to further clarify the intent and ensure that appropriate action is taken at the appropriate time by developers and landowners. There is no substantive change to the scope of the policy.  On this basis Administration is of the opinion that a public advertising process is not required in this instance. Administration is therefore recommending to Council that it considers adopting draft revised LPP 3.3 without advertising for public comment.

Comment

LPP 3.3 was prepared and adopted by Council to address issues associated with kangaroo populations on the urban periphery and avoid resultant conflict with residents and traffic in urban settings. LPP 3.3 is intended to ensure land owners/developers meet their responsibilities under state legislation for native fauna on their land. The logic behind LPP 3.3 is that, first, kangaroo habitat on the urban periphery is at ‘over-capacity’ for the populations that exist, and second, that habitat continues to diminish as urban development continues.

 

Hence, LPP 3.3 is designed to make all developers and land owners ensure they deal with the kangaroo populations on their land in an appropriate and humane way prior to any disturbance of that habitat, and that they do not simply drive kangaroos on to other properties or adjacent habitat, thereby exacerbating the overall problem and placing the cost of taking action on other landowners.

 

While the LPP was initially prepared with ‘greenfield’ development sites in mind, Administration is confident that the LPP applies to ‘brownfield’ contexts as well (i.e. vegetated sites supporting kangaroos within the existing urban setting).

 

Since its initial adoption, LPP 3.3 has provided developers and landowners with much needed information on the City’s requirements for planning proposals that may have an adverse impact on fauna such as kangaroos and emus.

 

 

These proposed modifications have arisen as a result of experience in implementation of the policy. Administration has found the provisions in the existing Policy were not clear on the requirements to contain the entirety of the land holding for the duration of the development. This lack of clarity may have resulted in fauna being unmanaged due to inadequate or no fencing in some development sites.

 

The revised LPP 3.3 also reinforces the need for developers and landowners to liaise with the DBCA on fauna management options early in the planning and development process so that the correct advice can be received and to potentially reduce assessment and approval times for Vegetation and Fauna Management Plans.

Statutory Compliance

Clause 5 of the deemed provisions of DPS 2 outlines the procedure involved in amending a local planning policy. The procedure for amending a Policy is the same as creating a new one, with the exception that the Local Government can waive the requirement to advertise if, in its opinion, the amendment is of a minor nature.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Natural)

3.2    Enhanced Environment

3.2.1  Maximise the environmental value of beaches nature reserves and parklands

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O22 Environmental Management

High

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Planning and Sustainability

Manage

Ineffective environmental management systems may lead to a lack of environmental awareness, control and possible breach of environmental obligations resulting in financial losses, irreparable damage to the environment and the City's reputation.

Policy Implications

The revised LPP 3.3, if adopted by Council, would supersede the existing Policy.

Financial Implications

Nil

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.       Pursuant to Subclause 5 (2) of the deemed provisions of DPS 2, ADOPTS the final draft revised Local Planning Policy 3.3: Fauna Management included in Attachment 1;

 

2.       Pursuant to Subclause 4 (4) of the deemed provisions of DPS 2, PUBLISHES notice of its adoption of the Policy in the Wanneroo Times and North Coast Times Community newspapers; and

 

3.       FORWARDS a copy of the adopted Policy to the Western Australian Planning Commission for its information.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Local Planning Policy 3.3: Fauna Management - Tracked Changes

19/389759

Minuted

2.

Local Planning Policy 3.3: Fauna Management

19/20707

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                   16

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3.3    Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan - Annual Review of Costs

File Ref:                                              23156V02 – 20/62008

Responsible Officer:                           A/Director Planning & Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       4         

 

Issue

To consider the revised cost estimates for the Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan (DCP).

Background

Amendment No. 122 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 was gazetted in September 2014 and introduced the DCP provisions into DPS 2. The Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan and Cost Apportionment Schedule were subsequently adopted by Council in April 2015 (PD07-04/15). The DCP identifies various community facilities and provides estimates on the total cost, estimated contributions and the timing for the delivery of infrastructure within the Yanchep-Two Rocks area, including:

·     Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club;

·     Yanchep District Open Space (Splendid Park); and

·     Capricorn Coastal Node Facilities.

The DCP is subject to an annual review requirement to ensure that the cost contribution is correctly set to ensure the collection of sufficient funds to cover the cost of approved infrastructure items over the life of the DCP.

To assist in stakeholder engagement, the Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan Advisory Committee (TAC) was established to inform the implementation of the DCP. The TAC provides information to the City on the number of new dwellings created during the review period and predictions for dwelling yields in future years.  It also provides advice on cost estimates for infrastructure, land valuations and the design, timing and preferred location of facilities.

The TAC consists of representatives of Parcel Property, Peet, Yanchep Beach Joint Venture (YBJV), Development WA, Primewest, Capricorn Village Joint Venture (CVJV), Fini Group, and Korda Mentha in accordance with the Terms of Reference agreed by Council on 10 November 2015 (PS07-11/15).

Council on 24 July 2018 resolved to increase the Yanchep-Two Rocks DCP cost contribution amount from $2,780 per dwelling to $3,485 per dwelling. On 13 November 2018, Council considered Amendment 166 to DPS 2 and resolved to extend the operating period of the DCP from 10 years to 16 years and approved the revised costs, subject to the gazettal of Amendment 166.

On the 18 June 2019, Amendment 166 to DPS 2 was gazetted and the cost per dwelling reduced from $3,485 to $3,175 (current rate). In addition to extending the operation period to 16 years, the annual review of costs introduced the ‘ID Forecast’ projections to estimate future dwelling yields rather than the use of landowner estimates, which were proven to be overly optimistic. Due to the current slow market conditions in the development sector, however, it is noted that even the ID Forecast projections are currently higher than the number of dwellings being created on the ground.

Detail

Technical Advisory Committee

 

At the meeting on 20 November 2019, the TAC considered the outcomes of the annual review for the Yanchep-Two Rocks DCP (as outlined in Attachment 1) and agreed that Council should proceed to advertise the revised costs in accordance with the provisions of DPS 2.

 

In addition, the TAC considered the ‘disbanding’ of the Committee in favour of a less formal working group and meet only as required; and the City undertaking further discussions with CVJV in relation to the coastal node design and associated DCP costs.  The TAC also requested further updates to the landowners on the progress of the land acquisition for the Yanchep District Open Space/Splendid Park and other cost factors (including borrowing), in accordance with the consultation requirements of DPS 2.

 

The TAC was formed under the Local Government Act 1995 and has no delegation for decision-making. There is no elected member representation and all matters requiring Council consideration require a separate report to Council, in accordance with DPS 2. The various landowner memberships, in effect, terminated on the day of the Ordinary Council elections in accordance with its Terms of Reference.

 

The majority of the infrastructure works have been completed with the only significant remaining costs being associated with the Capricorn Coastal Node and land compensation for the Yanchep District Open Space/Splendid Park. The provisions of DPS 2 provide the statutory basis for consultation and consideration of costs as part of the annual review process, which will be reported to Council on an annual basis. The disbanding of the Yanchep-Two Rocks TAC is therefore supported without the need to seek further membership. The intent to disband the TAC will be advertised to landowners along with the annual review of costs and reported back to Council in due course. 

 

Infrastructure costs

A summary of the updated cost estimates for each facility is detailed below. The below costs include the actuals to date and the estimated remaining costs.

Facility

2018/2019

Approved Costs

2019/2020

Annual Review

Difference

Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club

$7,961,163

$7,939,850

-$21,313

Yanchep District Open Space

 

 

 

- Land

$6,400,000

$6,080,000

-$320,000

- Oval groundworks

$2,873,996

$2,873,996

0

- Oval landscaping

$5,308,188

$5,318,646

$10,458

- Pavilion

$3,039,028

$2,781,721

-$246,849

Capricorn Coastal Node Facilities

$2,289,531

$2,158,873

-$130,658

TOTAL

$27,871,906

$27,153,086

-$718,820

Loans to fund Infrastructure

On behalf of the DCP, the City has borrowed funds from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, equating to $9 million currently.   Further borrowing of approximately $4.6 million will be required over the next 12 months to facilitate the DCP’s portion of the land acquisition of Yanchep District Open Space/Splendid Park ($4.2mil) and to make a cost apportionment adjustment between the City and the DCP, which is based on the total estimated dwelling yield proposed in the annual review.

 

The remaining interest payment of $3,627,301 has been included into the cost apportionment table. This borrowing cost relates to the total estimated loan servicing cost for the life of the DCP with the repayment of the principal borrowing not occurring until the end of the operational period (2030).

 

The remaining Coastal Node cost ($2,158,873) does not form part of the borrowing projections, as further borrowing by the DCP beyond current commitments is not recommended due to the high levels of borrowing already incurred. This position may be re-considered if market conditions improve during the operational period of the DCP.

 

To minimise any additional borrowing, the City will continue to liaise with CVJV who are progressing with the remaining coastal node design and construction works, as scheduled in the Capital Expenditure Plan (CEP) of the DCP for 2021/2022. 

Consultation

As outlined above, the TAC was consulted in November 2019 on the outcomes of the annual review and accepted the findings of the review for the purpose of landowner consultation under DPS 2.

 

Clause 11.6 of Schedule 14 of DPS 2 requires that where the review recommends that costs increase, the City shall invite comment from affected landowners for a period of not less than 28 days before making any decision to increase the costs that will apply through the DCP.

In accordance with Clause 11.7 of Schedule 14 of DPS 2, Council is required to consider any submissions received and within 90 days decide whether or not to increase the costs applicable through the DCPs.  As the DCP contribution rate is recommended to be increased, Administration will prepare a subsequent report for Council (post-advertising) to consider the submissions received and to adopt the revised costs.

Comment

The majority of infrastructure spending has been completed through the City’s capital works programme, with the main exception being land compensation payable to the landowner (YBJV) for Yanchep District Open Space/Splendid Park, the Yanchep Coastal Code works and minor landscaping works associated with the Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club.

·     Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club – This project is predominately complete with the exception of $56,000 required for the remaining rehabilitation works, which are scheduled for the 2019/2020 financial year. All other costs have been finalised and included into the cost estimates (actual costs). The total estimated cost for these works is $7,939,850 (including remaining rehabilitation works), which represents a minor reduction to the cost estimates used in 2018/2019 ($7,961,163) by $21,313.

 

·     Yanchep District Open Space – Construction costs including oval groundworks, landscaping and pavilion construction were completed for $10,974,363, with no remaining expenditure. A saving of $246,849 was achieved for the pavilion component of this cost.  The acquisition of the Yanchep District Open Space/Splendid Park land is due to be completed by April 2020 in accordance with the agreement between the City and YBJV. The current land valuation was prepared by Independent Valuers of WA and recommends a reduction in the land value from $6,400,000 to $6,080,000 (refer Attachment 2). The land acquisition discussions are ongoing with consideration for the recent valuation and the City’s agreement with YBJV. In accordance with clauses 12.3 and 12.4 of Amendment 122 to DPS 2, YBJV may object to the valuation and request a review of the valuation, and if after the review the parties do not agree the valuation, YBJV may apply to the State Administrative Tribunal for review of the valuation under part 14 of the Planning and Development Act 2005.

 

·     Capricorn Coastal Node Facilities – The detailed design and relevant approvals are being progressed by CVJV in consultation with the City and the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC). A minor reduction in the estimated costs from $2,289,531 to $2,158,873 was recommended by quantity surveyors Donald Cant Watts Corke (refer Attachment 3).   The coastal node cost estimates were based on a ‘template’ design for infrastructure works. However, CVJV has recently obtained detailed planning approval from the WAPC for the coastal node development, which is scheduled for construction in the 2020/2021 financial year. The City will use the detailed design costs to determine a reasonable scope of works that may be included based on the original template design and will report the findings to Council and affected landowners as part of the next annual review in 2021. In the recent meeting with CVJV it was discussed that this would be prefunded by CVJV as the DCP has not scheduled this cost until 2021/2022.

Despite a decrease in the overall costs of $718,820, the annual review recommends that the contribution rate increases from $3,175.25 to $3,398.77. The increase is associated with a lower than expected dwelling creation and a reduction in the total estimated dwelling yield from 10,868 to 10,220 by 2030. In this regard, dwelling creation is still tracking below the ID Forecasts for the area in this financial year, which is likely to result in further increases to rates and the City’s proportion of the infrastructure costs, unless dwelling yields increase into the future during the operation period of the DCP (2030).   This will depend on the recovery of the housing market and the improvement of the State’s economy.

It should be noted that Administration has based the 2019/2020 budget on the estimated dwelling yields recommended in the ID forecast and has not lowered the income estimates in the budget as part of the mid-year review due to the significant uncertainty regarding dwelling creation for the remainder of the financial year, where a further 300 dwellings would need to be created to align with the ID Forecast of 348 dwellings (48 dwellings created to date) by 30 June 2020.

Although the term "dwelling” is used, the intent in the DCP is that it relates to a built dwelling. However, where contributions are to be made on subdivisions, the term dwelling may also be taken to mean the number of lots. Where multiple or grouped dwelling sites are proposed, their contributions will be based on the initial subdivided lot, as well as any additional planned dwellings at the time of application for planning approval.

Statutory Compliance

The annual review process, including consultation requirements, is outlined in DPS 2.  It is noted that in terms of the provisions of DPS 2, landowners may object to the amount of a cost contribution and request a review by an independent expert. If this does not result in the cost contribution being acceptable to the landowners then landowners can request that the cost contribution be determined through a process of arbitration.  A similar right exists for the process of determining the value of any land to be acquired through the DCP.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “4     Civic Leadership

4.2    Good Governance

4.2.1  Provide transparent and accountable governance and leadership

 

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-G09 Long Term Financial Plan

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S23 Stakeholder Relationships

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

CEO

Manage

 

The above risks relating to the issue contained within this report have been identified and considered within the City’s Strategic Risk Registers.  The Annual review of the DCP will assist in addressing the impacts of the strategic risk relating to Long Term Financial Planning (LTFP) as it will ensure that appropriate budget monitoring, timing and provisions are considered.  In addition, the strategic risk relating to Stakeholder Relationships will apply as a key element in the DCP review process to maintain effective engagement with relevant stakeholders.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

The annual review of costs has recommended a decrease in total costs by $718,820.  This is primarily due to a reduction in the final costs for the Yanchep Surf Life Saving Club and District Open Space/Splendid Park.  It should be noted that the final land acquisition costs for Splendid Park will not be known until April 2020 at the earliest and could be subject to determination by the State Administrative Tribunal in accordance with DPS 2 if disputed by the landowner. Despite the decrease in the overall costs, the annual review recommends that the contribution rate increase from $3,175.25 to $3,398.77. The increase is associated with a continued lower than expected level of dwelling creation in this DCP area and reduction in the total estimated dwelling yield from 10,868 to 10,220.

 

The cost of DCP facilities is required to be equitably apportioned between the City and developing landowners. This apportionment is required to reflect the proportionate contribution of the existing community (3089 dwellings) and new development (7131 dwellings estimated) towards the need for the facilities.  This cost apportionment methodology was endorsed by Council and is set out in the DCP Report and Cost Apportionment Schedule.

 

The apportionment methodology was based on the ‘user pays’ principles and results in the City’s and DCP liability changing each year depending upon the total estimated dwelling yield. The apportionment of costs is adjusted annually between the City and DCP to reflect this cost sharing methodology.

 

The annual review recommends a revised apportionment, where the City’s obligation will increase from 28.42% to 30.23% and the DCP obligation will reduce from 71.58% to 69.77% to reflect the total estimated dwelling yield, as per the following.

 

·     Existing community / City contribution        -        30.23% of total DCP Cost (3089 dwellings)

·     New growth / Development contribution     -        69.77% of total DCP Cost (7131)

This cost apportionment between the City and the DCP directly related to the total dwelling yield estimate, which has reduced from 10,868 to 10,220, since the last review and consists of actuals to date and the remaining dwelling yield forecast for the remainder of the DCP operational period. Variations in the total dwelling yield will in-turn impact on the development contribution rate, as well as the City’s proportion of municipal funding.

 

The annual review recommendation results in a greater contribution rate to landowners (increase of $224 per dwelling) and an increase in the City’s proportion of the facility costs from $7,469,531 to $7,522,336 (increase of $52,805).

 

It should be noted that the City directly funds its proportion of the project costs at the time of construction and therefore loan borrowing costs and Administration costs are met entirely by the DCP.

 

The recommendations of the annual review were reviewed by the City’s external auditors William Buck in January 2020 and a copy of their findings has been included as Attachment 4. The audit opinion is ‘the DCP costs incurred, estimates for remaining development works, and proposed CPD rate of $3,398.77 (as per DPS 2 CPD formula) were fairly stated and in compliance to DPS 2 and SPP 3.6’.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

Recommendation

That Council as RECOMMENDED by the Audit and Risk Committee meeting held on 18 February 2020:-

 

1.       NOTES the outcome of the annual review of the Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan as depicted in Attachment 1;

 

2.       ENDORSES the revised Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan cost estimates in accordance with Clause 11.4 of District Planning Scheme No. 2 as outlined in Attachment 1, including:-

 

a)      A decrease in the total infrastructure costs from $27,871,906 to 27,153,086 as outlined in Attachment 1;

 

b)      An increase in the cost per dwelling from $3,175.25 to $3,398.77, as depicted in Attachment 1; and

 

c)      Pursuant to Clause 11.6 of Schedule 14 of District Planning Scheme No. 2 NOTIFIES affected landowners of the recommendations of the Annual Review and INVITES comment in writing from those landowners for a period of 28 days, including the request for the termination of the Yanchep Two Rocks Technical Advisory Committee; and 

 

3.       NOTES that the Yanchep-Two Rocks Development Contribution Plan Technical Advisory Committee SUPPORTS the approach set out in 2 above.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

YTR DCP Annual Review 2019 Attachment

19/500375

Minuted

2.

Attachment 2 - YTR Valuation 2019

19/500413

 

3.

Community Facilities Cost Report - September 2019 (Final Issue) (2)

19/455969

 

4.

Attachment 4 - WILLIAM BUCK EXTERNAL AUDIT

19/501344

 

  


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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                43

3.4    Draft WA Aviation Strategy 2020

File Ref:                                              7324 – 20/68502

Responsible Officer:                           A/Director Planning & Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil       

 

Issue

To consider a submission on the draft Western Australian Aviation Strategy 2020 (Aviation Strategy), seeking support for a future airport in the northern part of the Perth region.

Background

In August 2010, the State Government released ‘Directions 2031 and Beyond’, a high-level spatial framework and strategic plan to establish a vision for the future growth of the metropolitan Perth and Peel region. Directions 2031 and Beyond’ included the following implementation initiative for a prosperous city:

“7. Evaluate rationale for the construction of a third airport to service the metropolitan region. A process is urgently required to enable suitable sites to be identified now so that buffer zones may be included in future planning projects for establishing the type of airports required.”

It is understood that following this, a study on the matter was undertaken however, this study has not been completed.

Detail

The State Government released the draft Aviation Strategy for public comment on 10 February 2020. The draft Strategy is intended to set out the actions and future policy approach to foster improved airfare affordability and to ensure the aviation industry continues to support future growth of the State.

The draft Strategy acknowledges that the State Government has commenced investigations to identify suitable sites for a second civic aviation airport to Perth airport and a second general aviation airport to Jandakot airport.

In this regard, the action proposed in the draft strategy is that the State Government progresses investigations in relation to suitable sites for a second civil and general aviation airport to service the metropolitan region, and that this be undertaken by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage, on behalf of the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC).

The Strategy recognises that community access to air services is critical to regional liveability and attracting jobs to the regions. It also seeks to identify and realise tourism opportunities by drawing more visitors to the State through expanding the air route network.  Achieving the actions within the Strategy will require collaboration, engagement, innovation and transparency from airlines, airport operators, State, Commonwealth and local governments, and the resources and tourism sector, to positively impact airfares and air services.

Consultation

Nil

Comment

Council has previously endorsed a number of submissions on draft State Government strategies which have included reference to the matter of a possible future airport in or near the north-west metropolitan sub-region. These include:

 

·    A submission on the draft North-West Sub-Regional Planning Framework, which was endorsed by Council on 21 July 2015. This submission included a recommendation that the study being undertaken by the government on the siting of future airports for the Perth-Peel region should be required to give particular attention to the economic benefits such a proposal would have for this sub-region, and how this would support the broader strategic objectives for the region as a whole; and

 

·    A submission on the draft Perth Transport Plan @ 3.5 million and Beyond, endorsed by Council on 11 October 2016. This included the same recommendation as the above.

 

Council has more recently endorsed, as part of its Advocacy Factsheet: Freight, that the City of Wanneroo and adjacent regions offer many advantages in terms of geography, links with freight corridors and land availability and that the City should be considered when undertaking a site selection study for Perth’s second airport.

 

Low volume high margin and perishable exports such as flowers and live fish lend themselves to air freight. As Perth’s population and freight tasks increase pressure will be placed on its current primary passenger airport to accommodate demand by freight providers in the State and also interstate and overseas markets who expect just in time delivery. This high degree of air traffic has many risks in a residential area and Perth will need to consider if the current site will provide enough capacity for future growth.

 

The fact sheet also includes a diagram showing a proposed ‘Aerotropolis (2nd International Airport)’ location in the north-east part of the City of Wanneroo (An Aerotropolis refers to an area or region whose infrastructure, land use and economy is centered on an airport).

 

There is considerable economic merit in locating an additional airport in Wanneroo. Wanneroo forms part of a $1 billion per annum regional food zone producing over 60 agricultural products. It alone contributes 34% of the total gross value of agricultural commodities produced in the Perth region. In 2017/18, agriculture in the City contributed $327.71 million to output/total sales and created 1,040 total jobs.

 

An airport could facilitate further growth in this sector by servicing export markets. Its location in Wanneroo, within close proximity to Perth’s ‘Northern Food Bowl’, would allow for the faster and more direct transportation of fresh produce overseas as well as to other regions including the State’s north-west. An airport in Wanneroo could also stimulate different land use options and new industries in the region such as fishing and aquaculture.

 

The release of the draft Aviation Strategy provides an opportunity for the City to advocate for an airport in the northern part of the Perth region. It is therefore recommended that a submission be made on this matter.

Statutory Compliance

Nil


 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “2     Economy

2.2    Strategic Growth

2.2.5  Attract investment development and major infrastructure

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S12 Economic Growth

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Chief Executive Officer

Manage

 

Lack of consideration towards opportunities for major infrastructure in the City could limit its prospects for economic growth and development.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

The recommended submission will be prepared by Administration with the cost covered by the City’s operating budget.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council AUTHORISES the Chief Executive Officer to include a submission to the Department of Transport on the draft Western Australian Aviation Strategy 2020, supporting the progression of the current investigations to identify suitable sites for a second civil aviation and second general aviation airport, and requesting that these investigations consider the merits of siting these airports in or near the northern part of the Perth region.

 

 

Attachments: Nil  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                50

 

Approval Services

3.5    Consideration of Amendment No. 4 to the East Wanneroo Cell 3 Approved Structure Plan No. 5

File Ref:                                              20608-04 – 20/52101

Responsible Officer:                           A/Director Planning & Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       8         

 

Issue

To consider submissions received during public advertising of Amendment No. 4 to the East Wanneroo Cell 3 Approved Structure Plan No. 5 (ASP5).

 

Applicant

Catriona Tatum

Owner

Gabriel Morrow

Location

Lot 68 (71) High Road, Wanneroo

Site Area

2.0383 hectares

MRS Zoning

Urban

DPS 2 Zoning

Residential

 

Background

On 31 May 2017, the proponent requested the City consider an amendment to ASP5 to recode Lot 68 (71) High Road, Wanneroo (site) from Residential R20 to R40.

Detail

The site

 

The site is bounded by Amos Road to west and north and residential development to the east. A dwelling and shed gaining access from High Road are located on the site. The site is well vegetated. The East Wanneroo Primary School is approximately 150 metres south-west of the subject site. A location plan is provided as Attachment 1.

 

The Proposal

 

The applicant proposes to recode the site from Residential R20 to Residential R40 and justifies the proposal as follows:

 

·     The site is located one kilometre from the Wanneroo Town Centre, 150 metres from the East Wanneroo Primary School and 400 metres from the Wanneroo Secondary College; and

·     The site is serviced by public transport.

Consultation

On 10 July 2017, the Administration advised that the amendment would be advertised.

 

The Amendment was then advertised for public comment for a period of 28 days from 18 July to 15 August 2017 by means of an on-site sign, an advertisement in the Wanneroo Times newspaper, the City’s website and letters written to adjoining landowners.

 

The City received 12 submissions including one from the Department of Education (DoE). One submitter supported the proposal; Nine submitters objected to the proposal; one supported but proposed that the lots should face inwards; and DoE did not object to the proposal.

 

Administration did not finalise a report to Council immediately following public consultation as the applicant had yet to submit a Bushfire Management Plan (BMP) as the site is identified as a bushfire prone area. A BMP was provided on 19 June 2019.

 

Due to the passage of time since the amendment was advertised on 18 July 2017, the City re-advertised the amendment for a period of 35 days (seven days more than the statutory period of 28 days) from 5 December 2019 to 9 January 2020 by way of writing to those to whom the City had written during the first round of advertising and placing a notice on the City’s website. The City received three submissions including one from DoE. Two submissions objected to the proposal and DoE did not raise any objection to the amendment proposal. Of the two submissions objecting to the proposal one was a joint submission signed by 12 residents. None of the submitters during the second round made a submission during the first round excepting for DoE.

 

A summary of submissions received during the two rounds of public comment period and Administration’s response to the issues raised in the submissions are included as Attachment 3.

 

The major issues raised in the submissions objecting to the proposal are;

 

·        Increase in traffic;

·        Loss of vegetation and Animal Habitat;

·        Does not satisfy the objectives of LPP3.1 to provide affordable housing;

·        R40 development could become a ghetto; and

·        To consider the development as a private estate.

 

These issues are discussed in detail in the Comment section below.

Comment

Submitters Issues

 

Increase in Traffic

 

Concerns have been raised that the proposed amendment will generate a considerable volume of traffic that would affect the normal flow of traffic on Amos Road and High Road. To address the traffic issues the applicant submitted a Traffic Impact Assessment (TIA).

 

The amendment proposal could result in up to 64 dwellings. At a rate of 8 vehicle trips per dwelling per day, the total expected volume of traffic generated would be 512 vehicles per day (vpd) of which 40% (204 vpd) is expected to exit via Amos Road and 60% (308 vpd) via High Road.

 

Amos Road and High Road are 20 metres wide with a 7.2-metre wide carriageway. As per the provisions of the Western Australian Planning Commission’s (WAPC) Liveable Neighbourhoods Policy, these roads have a capacity to carry an indicative traffic volume of 3,000 vpd. The 2018 traffic volumes on Amos Road and High Road were recorded as 419 and 1584 vpd respectively. On the basis of the above information, Administration considers that the additional volume of traffic generated by the potential future development will not impact the normal flow of traffic on these roads.

 

Some submitters have pointed out that if the lots created along High Road were to gain access from High Road it could cause some traffic issues during the school hours. Further consideration on access can be addressed at the subdivision stage. However, it would not be reasonable to restrict access to High Road in this regard.

 

Some submitters have noted that vehicles parked on the road near the schools could cause some issues for the schools. In this regard it is noted that under the provisions of the City’s Parking Local Law 2015 a person can park a vehicle in a thoroughfare unless there is a restriction (clause 4.1). If street parking becomes an issue during the school hours, then as per the provisions of the City’s Parking Local Law, a no-parking sign during school hours could be installed by the City if it is determined to be necessary.

 

Loss of vegetation & Animal Habitat

 

The applicant provided a Flora and Fauna Management Plan, which identifies the vegetation conditions as ranging from very good to completely degraded. Approximately 60% of the vegetation is degraded to completely degraded, 35% is in good condition and only about 5% is in very good condition. Attachment 4 is the vegetation condition map.

 

Recoding of the land to R40 is unlikely to result in any further loss of vegetation than would be lost if the land were to be developed at its current R20 coding. A condition requiring the identification and protection of any vegetation worthy of retention that is not impacted by the subdivisional works can be imposed by the WAPC in a future subdivision application.

 

Some submitters have strongly suggested that the owners of the amendment area be required to have an independent report on the number of bird species that use the area and perhaps breed in the several larger trees.

 

In this regard the applicant has advised as follows:

 

The summary of the Ecological report is that the subject site is too small to retain any areas of ecological value, and provides no linkages. There are a few foraging trees for the Carnaby's cockatoo on site, but does not provide for significant foraging or nesting habitat.

 

The report conclusion states the following:

 

The ecological surveys undertaken within the subject area have found that whilst the native vegetation present is a small and fragmented patch, it retains some ecological values. In particular, the potential of the vegetation to provide some habitat to black cockatoos is noted. It is recommended that measures be undertaken to retain habitat trees within the future development where possible. However given the future urban
use of the land, it is recognised that there is limited opportunity for significant vegetation retention onsite. Prior to any clearing being undertaken within the subject area, approvals may be required at the state subdivision approval or Native Vegetation Clearing Permit and federal (EPBC Act referral assessment) level.

 

Administration considers that the applicant has provided sufficient information which demonstrates recoding of the land from R20 to R40 is unlikely to result in further loss of vegetation, and notes that the applicant’s report demonstrates the need to consider tree retention for the purposes of habitat where possible. Retention of vegetation will be considered in further detail at the subdivision stage.

 


 

Affordable Housing

 

One submitter raised concerns that the proposal does not align with Objective 2 of LPP 3.1 which is to address housing affordability within the City by providing a variety of housing stock. The submitter stated based on REIWA land sales figures and research on local WA buildings, that a three bedroom house and land package could cost between $320 - $380,000 (based on land coded R40 with a land size ranging from 220m2 to 300m2) which could result in costs being greater than the current median house price in Wanneroo of $332,000. The submitter also quotes a four bedroom house and land package on R20 coded land (average lot size of 450m2) could be around $425,000, which is below the current median house price of $480,000. Whilst these figures do indicate the cost of a new house and land package on R40 land may be higher than the current median house price, it is important to understand that median house prices are derived from sales of established developments, In Wanneroo, this could include development that is several decades old the value of which may not be comparable with newer development. The amendment will introduce an alternative housing choice within the surrounding established R20 area at a lower cost than developing a new four bedroom dwelling at the current R20 code (based on the submitters figures) which demonstrates that Objective 2 of LPP 3.1 has been satisfied.

 

Additional Comments

 

Local Planning Policy 3.1- Local Housing Strategy Implementation (LPP3.1)

 

LPP3.1 provides the framework to guide the planning and development of increased housing density in the housing precincts that are identified in the policy. The policy also guides other infill development areas located outside those housing precincts. The amendment area is located outside of the Wanneroo Housing precinct as shown in Attachment 5. Therefore Section 9 in Part 2 of the policy relevant to Other Infill Development will apply.

 

Subsection 9.1 (b) of LPP3.1 states that:

 

Where the land concerned is the subject of an approved structure plan under DPS2, the application for amendment of that Structure Plan must include an assessment of how the proposal:

 

i.   Is appropriate within the broader planning framework provided by the Structure Plan;

ii.   Satisfies the criteria in Table 3 of this Policy relating to infill development and increased density; and

iii.  Supports the objectives and recommendations of the Local Housing Strategy.

 

The proposed amendment satisfies these criteria as follows:

 

1.         The ASP 5 area is well established and is comprised predominantly of single residential development at the R20 density with pockets of R40 coded residential land north of Belgrade Road. The proposed R40 lots will not be out of character within the existing structure plan area, particularly given the proximity of the land to a local school (150 metres) and a high frequency bus route. The proposed R40 Density is considered to be appropriate within the broader planning framework set out by ASP 5.

 

2.         The proposal satisfies Table 3 of the policy as demonstrated below:


 

Table 3 Criteria for other Infill Development and increased Density

No.

Criterion

Policy Application

Comment

1.

Easy access/close proximity to Activity Centres

R40 between 401 and 800 metres from an edge of Activity Centre excluding Local Centres.

The subject land is approximately one kilometre from the edge of the Wanneroo Activity Town Centre. Therefore the proposal does not satisfy this criterion being greater than 800 metres from Wanneroo Activity Centre.

2.

Easy access/close proximity to public transport with priority towards rail nodes and bus interchanges.

R60 within 250 metres of a high frequency bus route designated stops. High frequency bus route is defined as having a minimum of four services per hour during peak periods.

The subject land is located between 200 and 400 metres from high frequency bus route No. 467 as shown in Attachment 7.

 

 

In regard to the above two criteria it is noted that Council, at its meeting of 1 March 2016, considered an amendment to LPP 3.1 (ref item PS01-03/16). The amendment only affected infill development outside the housing precincts. The purpose of the amendment was to ensure that high density development outside the housing precincts was only to be permitted in appropriate locations that were within a walkable catchment of an activity centre or to a well serviced public transport connection. Following public consultation the amendment to LPP3.1 was adopted by Council at its meeting of 26 April 2016 (ref item PS10-04/16). In view of the amendment to LPP3.1, the subject amendment proposal is required to satisfy one of the above two criteria. Administration is of the view that the proposal would satisfy Criterion No.2 as discussed below.

 

LPP3.1 does not define “Peak Periods” of the bus routes and therefore Administration has referred to the WAPC’s State Planning Policy 7.3 – Residential Design Codes (R-Codes) which defines “Peak Periods” as 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Within these Peak Periods, there are 11 and 9 bus services provided respectively on Scott Road.

 

LPP3.1 was based on the City’s 2005 Housing Strategy, which was based on the WAPC’s then draft LN policy Edition 3, and recommended a target density of 20-30 dwelling units per site hectare within 250 metres of a main bus route.

 

The current LN policy makes provision for locating bus stops conveniently for the walkable catchment served at an average spacing of 300-400 metres (Element 2 – Requirement 26). The LN policy considers 400 metres to be a walkable distance for daily needs. Therefore applying the provisions of the LN policy, the amendment area is considered to be within a walkable distance of 400 metres to a high frequency bus route and stop.

 

Although LPP 3.1 identifies higher density development may be appropriate within 250 metres of a high frequency bus route, regard should also be given to walkable catchment efficiency as outlined in Liveable Neighbourhoods (LN). LN considers that typically, most people will walk up to 400 metres for daily activities and up to 800 metres to a train station or town centre. The amendment area falls predominantly within a 400 metre catchment area of high frequency bus route 467 (designated stop on Scott Road) which demonstrates the land is in close proximity to public transport as required by Criterion No. 2. 

3.       The objectives of LPP3.1 are as follows:

 

·    To address State government policy to increase housing density within the existing urban footprint of the metropolitan region and meet State Government infill housing targets;

·    To address housing affordability within the City by providing a variety of housing stock;

·    To better utilise existing infrastructure and amenities in existing suburbs by providing additional dwellings in close proximity; and

·    To promote higher density development in appropriate locations.

 

The proposed amendment supports the objectives of LPP3.1 as follows:

 

·    It addresses the WAPC’s State Planning Policy 3 – Urban Growth and Settlement by proposing higher density development in areas accessible to transport and services

·    The proposed R40 density addresses housing affordability by providing a variety of housing stock;

·    The proposed amendment would better utilise the existing infrastructure and amenities available in this locality; and

·    As demonstrated in Table 3 above the amendment promotes R40 density in an appropriate location.

 

Bushfire Management Plan (BMP)

 

The applicant submitted a BMP prepared by a qualified consultant. Attachment 8 is the Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) contour map identifying a BAL rating of 12.5 over most of the site except for some of the site fronting High Road, which is rated BAL29.

 

The BMP was referred to the Department of Fire Emergency Services (DFES) for comment. DFES advised that the BMP has adequately identified issues arising from the bushfire risk assessment and supported the recommendations of the BMP.

 

Proposed recoding

 

The proposed amendment depicts a road across the site between High Road and Amos Road. This is only a concept and is not part of a typical structure plan. The applicant has amended the proposal to remove the road reserve and correctly show the entire site being recoded from R20 to R40. A road reserve will be created through a future subdivision application if one is necessary for future development. Administration has discussed this with the applicant who is supportive of this change.

 

Considering the above matters it is recommended that the proposed amendment be supported.

Statutory Compliance

This Structure Plan Amendment has been processed in accordance with the requirements of DPS2 and the deemed Regulations.

 

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.1  Create opportunities that encourage community wellbeing and active and healthy lifestyles

Risk Management Considerations

There are no existing Strategic or Corporate risks within the City's existing risk registers which relate to the issues contained in this report.

Policy Implications

This proposal has been assessed under the provisions of the City’s Local Planning Policy 3.1: Local Housing Strategy Implementation, the WAPC’s State Planning Policy 3 – Urban Growth and Settlement, Liveable Neighbourhoods policy and State Planning Policy 7.3 – Residential Design Codes.

Financial Implications

Under the provisions of DPS2, at the time of either subdivision or development the applicant will be required make a developer contribution.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority.

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.      Pursuant to subclause 20(2)(e) of the deemed provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 RECOMMENDS to the Western Australian Planning Commission that the proposed Amendment No. 4 to the East Wanneroo Cell 3 Approved Structure Plan No. 5 as contained in Attachment 2 to the report be approved WITH MODIFICATION to recode the entire amendment area as Residential R40 and to delete the road reserve shown in the amendment plan;

2.      Pursuant to subclause 20(2) of the deemed provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No. 2 PROVIDES a copy of the report on the proposed amendment to the Western Australian Planning Commission including the schedule of submissions and the City’s response and recommendations; and

3.      ADVISES the submitters of its decision.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Location Plan

18/451853

 

2.

Attachment 2  - Part 1 of the Amendment

18/451632

Minuted

3.

Attachment 3 - Schedule of submissions and Administration's response

20/65323

 

4.

Attachment 4 - Vegetation Condition

18/451636

 

5.

Attachment 5- Wanneroo Housing Precinct

18/451646

 

6.

Attachment 6 - Bus routes

20/5103

 

7.

Attachment 7 - Distance from the bus stop

20/2490

 

8.

Attachment 8 - BAL contour map

19/435996

 

 


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3.6    Local Planning Policies

File Ref:                                              3446 – 20/65760

Responsible Officer:                           A/Director Planning & Sustainability

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       3         

 

Issue

To consider proposed Local Planning Policies prior to the preparation of a report to Council.

Background

As part of the consideration of the City’s planning framework, Administration has identified the need for a number of policies.

 

The three draft policies identified below were presented to Elected Members for discussion at the Council Forum held on 24 February 2020.

 

A copy of the draft policies is included as Attachments 1, 2 and 3.

 

Draft Policy

Purpose

LPP 4.25: Substantial Commencement

To provide guidance on  what constitutes substantial commencement of development

LPP 4.11: Variations to Building Envelopes

To provide guidance on the circumstances that may be considered to modify Building Envelopes

LPP 2.10: Sea Containers

To guide the use of Sea Containers

Detail

Through the course of daily operations and delivery of the planning approvals service to the community, Administration has identified several opportunities to introduce new Local Planning Policies (LPPs) that will serve to clarify and make easier the requirements and processes for these matters.

 

LPP’s are prepared under the provisions of District Planning Scheme No.2 and form an important part of the City’s Planning framework. LPPs provide guidance and direction on the City’s approach and position on various planning matters, particularly where discretion is being sought or expectations need to be made clear for the community.  LPP’s also provide for a level of consistency in approach and certainty in relation to planning proposals.

 

A brief explanation of each of the proposed new LPP’s is provided below.

 

LPP 4.25: Substantial Commencement

 

The purpose of this proposed policy is to provide guidance on what amount of work determines when a development has been substantially commenced. This is important for dealing with matters where an approval has (or is nearly) expired and works may have commenced or little if any work has actually been undertaken on site.

 

It is necessary to be able to clearly advise developers and the community whether an approval has lapsed or if sufficient work has been undertaken enabling works or a land use to continue.  However, this is not a matter that is clearly defined under the Planning and Development Act or regulations.

This proposed policy will assist with responding to enquiries regarding the validity of development approvals and to enable clear and consistent advice to be provided.

 

Applications for development approval are typically issued with a requirement that they are commenced within a specified timeframe (the default is two years) otherwise the approval lapses and a new approval will be required.  Time limited approvals are necessary to ensure that development is commenced in a reasonable timeframe and because the planning framework changes from time to time.

 

LPP 4.11: Variations to Building Envelopes

 

The intent of this policy is to introduce objectives and standards to guide landowners who seek to vary the building envelope on their property. It will also assist Administration to consider such applications in a consistent manner against a clear set of objectives.

 

Building envelopes are created in various zones for the purpose of restricting the area of a lot which may be built upon.  This policy is intended to apply to lots with building envelopes in the various zones. The purpose of Building Envelopes is usually to contain development and prevent clearing of sites in order to protect and retain vegetation while allowing sensitively located development.

 

Administration often receives applications for seeking to modify the size, location or extent of a building envelope.  However there is no specific criteria in DPS 2 that sets out the basis for considering requests to vary building envelopes.

 

The proposed criteria includes the need to have regard to matters such as loss of vegetation, geophysical constraints (karst etc), the location of dwellings on adjoining lots, impact on neighbours and the landscape. The policy also clarifies that more than one building envelope on a site can be considered as well as variations to the size and shape of the envelope provided the objectives are met.

 

LPP 2.10: Sea Containers

 

This policy has been developed to guide and control the use of Sea Containers and ensure that they meet an acceptable standard and do not adversely impact on the amenity of a locality.  This is to be achieved through the introduction of objectives and criteria dealing with the standard, nature and positioning of sea containers.

 

The use of sea containers has become increasingly common in a variety of building applications. Due to their material strength and that they are relatively cheap they are seen by some as a cost effective solution for a range of building needs from dwellings to sheds and even for commercial structures such as shops and hotels. 

 

Sea containers come in a variety of sizes and are typically used for temporary or permanent storage in a variety of situations. They are also used as transportable site offices among a range of other uses.  The City has received only a small number of development applications for sea containers over recent years and there have been no complaints related to their use or appearance.

 

The use of Sea Containers as a building material can be permitted in all areas of the City, but their use and appearance needs to be managed as they can have a negative impact due to their height and scale on adjoining properties and affect the amenity of a locality. 

Consultation

In accordance with Clause 4 of the DPS2 Deemed Provisions, it is necessary to formally advertise a proposed LPP for a period of not less than 21 days.

Administration is proposing to advertise the proposed LPPs for a period of 42 days.  This is consistent with the way other LPPs have been advertised and allows more time for the provision of comments.  Advertising will be undertaken by way of the following:

 

·    Notification in the Wanneroo Times newspaper;

·    Display at the Civic Centre and on the City’s website; and

·    Letter to the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage.

Comment

The procedures for preparing, amending and revoking LPPs are set out in the Deemed Provisions of DPS 2, which prescribe that a LPP can be prepared on any matter related to the planning and development of its Scheme area, and must be based on sound town planning principles and may address either strategic or operational considerations in relation to matters to which the policy applies.

 

The proposed LPPs are based on sound planning principles and address operational considerations in the assessment and consideration of development applications.  The proposed policies have been set out to improve the manner in which development and other planning proposals are processed and considered and will enhance the City’s planning framework by setting appropriate controls and putting in place consistent measures.

 

The LPP’s will guide potential applicants on what the City will and will not take into account when considering proposals.

Statutory Compliance

The above draft LPPs have been prepared in accordance with Division 2 – Local Planning Policies of DPS 2 which outlines the circumstances and procedures for which a local government may prepare a local planning policy.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “4     Civic Leadership

4.2    Good Governance

4.2.2  Provide responsible resource and planning management which recognises our significant future growth

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-C01 Compliance Framework

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Manager Governance and Legal

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO O01 Relationship Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Manage

               

The above risks relating to the issues contained within this report have been identified and considered within the City’s Corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

The preparation of these draft policies will provide additional guidance and direction to assist in achieving the City’s objectives of delivering orderly and proper planning.

Policy Implications

The preparation of the above policies is undertaken by Administration to ensure that the City achieves its strategic goals and by conforming to current statutory and legislative provisions through the use of local planning policies.

Financial Implications

The costs associated with undertaking the preparation of the proposed LPPs can be met from the current Planning and Sustainability operational budget.

 

Voting Requirements

 

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.         Pursuant to Clause 4 of the Deemed Provisions of the City of Wanneroo District Planning Scheme No.2, resolves to PREPARE the following Local Planning Policies, as contained in Attachments 1,2 and 3:

 

a)      Local Planning Policy 4.25: Substantial Commencement;

b)      Local Planning Policy 4.11: Variations to Building Envelopes;

c)      Local Planning Policy 2.10: Sea Containers; and

 

2.         ADVERTISES the Local Planning Policies, as shown in Attachments 1, 2 and 3, for a period of 42 days by way of the following:-

 

a)      An advertisement published in the Wanneroo Times newspaper at the commencement of the advertising period;

b)      Display at the City of Wanneroo’s Civic Centre Building and on the City of Wanneroo’s website; and

c)      Letter to the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage.

 

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Local Planning Policy No. 4.25: Substantial Commencement

20/59902

Minuted

2.

Local Planning Policy No. 4.11: Variations to Building Envelopes

20/67641

Minuted

3.

Local Planning Policy No. 2.10: Sea Containers

20/60005

Minuted

 

 

 

 


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Assets

Infrastructure Capital Works

3.7    Tender No 19192 - Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building Construction

File Ref:                                              32966 – 19/357186

Responsible Officer:                           Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider Tender No. 19192 for the Construction of Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building, Alkimos.

Background

The project is listed in the 2019/2020 Capital Works Program and involves the design and construction of a sport amenities building at Leatherback Park, an active public recreation reserve located off Fairy Parade in Alkimos.  The site is on Lot 9337 on Reserve Number 33506 with a total land area of approximately 4.46ha and is City managed Crown land. There are currently three transportable structures on site; one is used as a storage shed and the other two as change areas/toilets. There are no other existing community or changeroom facilities on site or within the vicinity of Leatherback Park. The reserve is currently used by Alkimos Pirates Lacrosse Club, Alkimos Ball Club, Brighton Seahawks Junior Football Club, Eglinton District Cricket Club, Alkimos Beach Primary School and the West Perth District Football Development for competitions.

 

Tender No 19192 includes site preparation works, construction of the new sports amenities building and fit out, and will include a multi-purpose room, two changerooms, kiosk, first aid room, umpire room, cleaner’s room, timer locked public toilets, verandas, electrical and communications room, bin store and other associated services.

Detail

Tender No. 19192, for the Construction of Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building, was advertised on 9 October 2019 and closed on Wednesday 30 October 2019.

 

A non-mandatory site briefing was held on 15 October 2019 at Leatherback Park in Alkimos to provide tenderers the opportunity to inspect the existing site and 4 addendums were issued prior to the closing of the tender. 

 

Essential details of the proposed contract are as follows:

 

Item

Detail

Contract Form

Major Works AS4000

Contract Type

Lump Sum

Contract Duration

32 weeks (from site possession date and excluding defects liability period)

Contract Award Date

11 March 2020

Site Possession

Late March 2020

Completion Date

Early November 2020

Defects Period

12 Months

Extension Permitted

No

Rise and Fall

Maximum Perth All Groups CPI increases upon extensions.

Tender submissions were received from the following companies:

Company (full entity name)

Company (abbreviated name)

Business Address (Suburb)

Hoskins Investments Pty Ltd ATF M R Hoskins Family Trust T/A AE Hoskins Building Services

AE Hoskins

Osborne Park

Bistel Construction Pty Ltd

Bistel

Hillarys

Geared Construction Pty Ltd 

Geared

Gnangara

LKS Constructions (WA) Pty Ltd

LKS

Malaga

M Construction (WA) Pty Ltd

M Construction

Leederville

Maintenance & Construction Services Australia Pty Ltd

MACS

Kwinana

Mitie Construction Pty Ltd

Mitie

Hillarys

Shelford Construction Pty Ltd

Shelford

East Rockingham

Tender validity for all compliant tender submissions was successfully extended until 30 March 2020 to enable award postponement pending the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) grant funding outcomes.

Shortlisting Criteria

The tender included a provision that submissions exceeding 5% over the City’s construction pre-tender estimate may not be considered and excluded from further assessment. On that basis, the following four submissions were evaluated further:

Company (abbreviated name)

AE Hoskins

Bistel

Geared

Shelford

Tender Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation panel comprised:

·    Project Manager (Chair) – Infrastructure Capital Works;

·    Project Manager – Infrastructure Capital Works;

·    Planning Officer – Community Facilities;

·    Project Architect – Lee Syminton Architect Pty Ltd; and

·    Occupational Safety & Health Officer – People and Culture.

Probity Oversight

Oversight to the tender assessment process was undertaken by the City’s Contracts Officer.

 

Tender submissions were evaluated in accordance with the Procurement Evaluation Plan (PEP).  The PEP included the following selection criteria:

Item No

Description

Weighting

1

Organisational Experience

25%

2

Key Personnel Experience

25%

3

Methodology

25%

4

Occupational Health & Safety

20%

5

Quality Management

5%

Price was not included in the Qualitative Criteria, but was considered as part of the overall value for money assessment and the minimum acceptable baseline for Qualitative Criteria being set at 50%.

Evaluation Criteria 1 – Organisational Experience (25%)

Assessment of this criterion considered the tenderers experience in successfully supplying services of similar nature and circumstance with consideration given to project relevance, type, size and complexity. Based on the response provided by the tenderers the assessment of this criterion has resulted in the following ranking:

Tenderer

Ranking

Geared

1

Shelford

1

Bistel

3

AE Hoskins

4

Evaluation Criteria 2 – Key Personnel Experience (25%)

The tenderers’ resources as presented in its tender submissions were assessed in order to evaluate their capacity to meet the requirements of the contract.  Assessment of this criterion considered the tenderer’s key personnel who will be involved in the project with consideration given to project experience, relevant industry qualifications and type, size and complexity of projects previously undertaken.  Based on the response provided by the tenderers, the assessment of this criterion has resulted in the following ranking:

Tenderer

Ranking

Geared

1

Shelford

1

Bistel

3

AE Hoskins

4

Criteria 3 - Methodology (25%)

The tenderers’ methodology as presented in the tender submissions was assessed in order to evaluate their capacity and capability to meet the requirements of the contract.  Assessment of this criterion considered the tenderers’ project management procedures and project methodology, as presented in their tender submissions to evaluate the tenderers’ understanding, methods and construction programme to meet the relevant timeframe of the contract. Based on the response provided by the tenderers, the assessment of this criterion has resulted in the following ranking:


 

 

Tenderer

Ranking

Geared

1

Bistel

2

Shelford

3

AE Hoskins

4

 

Evaluation Criteria 4 – Occupational Health & Safety (20%)

Evidence of safety and quality management policies and practices was assessed from the tender submissions.  The assessment for safety management was based on the tenderers’ responses to an Occupational Health and Safety Management System Questionnaire included within the tender documentation. All tenderers provided details of their safety management systems. Based on the response provided by the tenderers, the assessment of this criterion has resulted in the following ranking:

Tenderer

Ranking

AE Hoskins

1

Shelford

2

Bistel

3

Geared

3

Evaluation Criteria 5 - Quality Management Systems (5%)

Evidence of quality management certification and quality management policies, practices and procedures was assessed from the tender submissions. All tenderers provided details of their quality management systems. Based on the response provided by the tenderers, the assessment of this creation has resulted in the following ranking:

Tenderer

Ranking

Bistel

1

Geared

1

Shelford

1

AE Hoskins

4

Overall Weighted Assessment and Ranking

Tenderer’s submissions were reviewed in accordance with the Procurement Evaluation Plan and were assessed for the necessary resources, previous experience, capability, safety and quality management systems to undertake the construction works.

 

The overall weighted assessment resulted in the following tender ranking:

Tenderer

Ranking

Geared

1

Shelford

2

Bistel

3

AE Hoskins

4

The baseline for the Qualitative Criteria was set at 50% with the four shortlisted tenderers achieving an acceptable qualitative assessment.


 

Tendered Price Ranking

Tenderers’ price submissions were reviewed and confidential Attachment 1 provides the detailed price information. Price comparisons were undertaken for the primary scope and also the full works, including the optional item. This tender report and recommendation considers the full works including the option to construct the multipurpose room.

 

Tenderer

Ranking

Bistel

1

Shelford

2

Geared

3

AE Hoskins

4

Overall Comment

Of the four tenderers who achieved an acceptable qualitative assessment, the combined assessments for Price vs Qualitative scores were reviewed. Whilst all conforming tenderers presented good quality submissions, Bistel provided the best value for money. Bistel is therefore recommended as the successful tenderer for this project.

Consultation

Throughout the design phase of the project the City worked collaboratively with key stakeholders, sports clubs and user groups. The public comment process with nearby residents, various sporting clubs and user groups was undertaken from February to March 2019.

 

As reported in CP03-04/19 Concept Design – Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building, the public comment period for the project was open for a period of four weeks from 18 February to 15 March 2019. An information letter which included the concept and site plan was posted to 835 residents within a 400m radius of the park. Liaison with Department of Education and the Alkimos Beach Primary School regarding the approval of concept plans was carried out on 6 March 2019.

 

Key internal stakeholders have been engaged during various stages of the design phase, and were invited to provide comment at several stages.

Post tender award and during the construction phase, the City will provide regular progress updates on key project milestones or events; post information on City’s webpage and media channels.

Statutory Compliance

Tenders were invited in accordance with the requirements of Section 3.57 of the Local Government Act 1995. The tendering procedures and evaluation complied with the requirements of Part 4 of the Local Government (Functions and General) Regulations 1996.

 

Necessary building permit application will be made by the recommended tenderer following the tender award.


 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.2  Facilitate opportunities within the City to access peak and elite activities

 

          “3      Environment (Built)

         

                   3.4 Activated Places

3.4.2 Provide safe spaces, centres and facilities through our infrastructure management and designs for community benefit and recreation”

Enterprise Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O07 Purchasing

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O08 Contract Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O17 Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

Financial and Performance Risk

Financial Risk

An independent financial risk assessment was undertaken as part of the tender evaluation process by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. The outcome of this assessment advised that Bistel has a ‘Satisfactory’ financial capacity to undertake the contract.

 

As per tender requirements, Bistel Constructions Pty Ltd is required to provide two bank guarantees with a combined total of 5.0% of the contract value, 2.5% to be returned at practical completion and 2.5% to be returned at finalisation of defects liability, to be paid to the City within 14 days of acceptance of tender.

 

Performance Risk

Bistel undertook the works for the Yanchep Surf Club including civil works and Yanchep Sports Amenities Building for the City in 2017, delivering an excellent quality build on schedule and within budget. No claims, disputes or notices of default are registered against the company.

 

Independent reference check from City of Rockingham confirmed the recommended tenderer has achieved positive results across all criteria for a similar contract and is highly recommended to undertake work included in this contract.

 

Social and Environmental (Sustainable Procurement) Considerations

The Tender document included this consideration as a non-weighted criterion and all conforming submissions were deemed to satisfy this requirement.

 

Broader Economic Impact Implications for the City of Wanneroo

The Tender document included broader economic impact implications as a non-weighted criterion through the use of a Buy Local questionnaire. Tender Number 19192 was advertised in October 2019, before the City’s current tender selection criteria was updated to include ‘Buy Local’ as a weighted criteria.

 

Bistel confirmed that it has seven employees and seven subcontractors living and operating locally and are committed to materials and manufacturing goods from Wanneroo and surrounds where possible.

Policy Implications

Tenders were invited in accordance with the requirements of the City’s Purchasing Policy.

Financial (Budget) Implications

The table below summarises the available funding for the project, current expenditures and the recommended tender price by Bistel Construction Pty Ltd for the provision of major works for construction of Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building and Multipurpose Room and associated expenses:

PR-2990   Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building

Description

Expenditure

Budget

Budget:

 

 

Allocated Capital Works Budget for 2018/19 (PR-2990)

 

$40,000

Allocated Capital Works Budget for 2019/20 (PR-2990) ($165,000 reallocated to 20/21 at MYR)

 

$255,000

Allocated Capital Works Budget for 2020/21 (PR-2990)

 

$1,478,000

Expenditure:

 

 

Expenditure incurred in 2018/2019

$35,407

 

Expenditure incurred to date (2019/2020)

$53,718

 

Commitment to date

$40,568

 

Project Management & Professional Fees

$40,000

 

RFT 19192 – For construction of Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building (Total Lump Sum including Multipurpose room)

Recommended Tenderer – Bistel Constructions Pty Ltd

$1,420,773

 

Other Works (Transportable building relocation, pave extra footpath area as per school request, design & install reticulation, CCTV and turf etc.)

$75,976

 

Construction Contingency (for main works & multipurpose room)

$106,558

 

Total Expenditure

$1,773,000

 

Total Funding

 

$1,773,000

 

The City requested an amount of $555,667 through the CSRFF grant funding process; however, only $400,000 was successful. Therefore, it is proposed that the shortfall of $155,667 in the draft 2020/21 Capital Budget will be sourced from Municipal Funds.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       ACCEPTS the tender submitted by Bistel Constructions Pty Ltd for Tender No.19192, for the provision of Major Works for Construction of Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building and Multipurpose Room at the Fixed Lump Sum Price of $1,420,772.28 in accordance with the terms and conditions specified in the tender document and subject to the City receiving all necessary permits and approvals; and

2.       NOTES the addition of $155,667 of Municipal Funding in the draft 2020/2021 capital budget to cover the shortfall of the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) grant for the construction of Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building and Multipurpose Room.

 

Attachments:

1.

Attachment 1 - Tender 19192 Leatherback Park Confidential attachment

20/57709

 

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                   92

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                98

 

Waste Services

3.8    Better Bins Funding Agreement

File Ref:                                              1458V02 – 20/65987

Responsible Officer:                           Director Assets

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       1         

 

Issue

To consider Better Bins Kerbside Collection Program Funding Agreement with the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation.

Background

The Waste Authority, on behalf of the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation (DWER), offers funding to local governments through the Better Bins Kerbside Collection Program (Better Bins). The Better Bins program encourages the use of a three bin system, general waste, commingled recycling and food organics and/or garden organics, to support greater source separation and higher recovery rates.

 

Better Bins funding is determined by the type of kerbside services provided by local governments and the number of households to which services are provided. The Better Bins funding methodology is provided below:

 

 

Council considered Item No AS04-03/18 - Better Bins Program Application at its meeting on 6 March 2018 and resolved to:

 

“1.  AUTHORISES Administration to prepare an application for funding under the Waste Authority’s “Better Bins” program for the introduction of a three bin system;

 

2.   AUTHORITISES the Chief Executive Officer to consider, approve and submit an application for the Waste Authority’s “Better Bins” program which will include the program objectives, community education and information program, roll out details and ongoing data collection, development of key performance indicators (KPIs) and reporting program;

 

3.   REQUESTS that a further report be prepared and presented to Council to provide full details of the ‘Better Bins Program’ including financial analysis, risk and implications associated with the Program before any final decision on the implementation of the Program or the acceptance of any offer of funding; and

 

4.   NOTES that the Director Assets will present to Council the outcome of the Waste Service Review by mid-2018 which will provide strategic direction on the preferred service model for waste and which will have a direct bearing on this application.”

 

Administration initiated action to implement Council’s decisions, with Council considering a further report at its meeting on 21 August 2018, Item No AS02-08/18 - Service Delivery Review - Waste Services and resolved (in part) to:

“1.   RECEIVES the “Waste Services Service Delivery Review 2018 – Report”;

2.    ENDORSES the implementation of the Draft “Waste Services Service Delivery Review 2018 – Transition Plan” as detailed in Attachment 2;

3.    ENDORSES the City’s application for funding through the Better Bins Kerbside Collection Program;”

This report considers the details of the action taken by Administration and the funding agreement negotiated with DWER.

Detail

Implementing a FOGO three bin system fully aligns with the objectives of the recently published Western Australia Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery State Waste Strategy 2030.

 

To fully understand all waste management options available to the City for organics processing, a non-procurement Expression of Interest was developed and published in January 2019. Six submissions were received that concluded Food Organics and Garden Organics (FOGO) processing could be available locally (within the City’s boundary) and information on the likely costs.

 

In line with the Better Bins Program, Waste Services Service Delivery Review Transition Plan and the City’s Strategic Waste Management Plan, a detailed business case was developed to assess the suitability of a Three Bin Kerbside Collection System (Better Bins program) for separately collected food and garden organics waste.

 

The business case for the implementation of a Three Bin Kerbside Collection System was considered by Council at its meeting on 2 July 2019; Item No AS06-07/19, and resolved in part, to:

“1. APPROVES the implementation of the Three Bin Kerbside Collection System (as per Options 2B and 3B in the Business Case) in line with the Waste Authority’s Better Bins program, that separately collects Food and Garden Organics wastes for onward processing by a third party contractor in to an Australian Standard AS 4454-2012 compliant product;

2.  AUTHORISES administration to invite tenders for the commissioning of a suitable contractor to process the City’s Food and Garden Organics waste;

3.  SEEKS a further report following the completion of the tender process as per Recommendation 2, detailing the implementation schedule including key milestones and dates, risk mitigation strategies, and deployment details;

4.  AUTHORISES the Chief Executive Officer to finalise and authorise the Better Bins Program Funding Agreement with the Waste Authority.”

 

In September 2019 a tender for the Provision of FOGO Processing was advertised; six responses were received. Following the City’s evaluation of the tender submissions, it became apparent that the waste management industry had not developed its FOGO processing options significantly since the EOI process conducted by the City in December 2018. As a result:

•    No FOGO option would be available by the City’s target date of 1 July 2020;

•    No processing options are available within the City’s boundaries; and

•    The gate fee proposed by tenderers was higher than previously indicated from the earlier EOI process.

 

Following this, Council considered Item No AS02-12/19 at its meeting on 10 December 2019 and resolved, in part to:

“1. DECLINES all tender submissions for Tender No. 19168 Provision of Food Organics and Garden Organics Processing, in accordance with the conditions of tendering; and

2.  AUTHORISES administration to invite tenders for the commissioning of a suitable contractor for the processing City’s Garden Organic materials to enable the implementation of the Three Bin Kerbside Collection System (as per Options 2A and 3A as explained in the report); that separately collects Garden Organics for onward processing by a third party contractor.”

 

In line with Council’s decision, Administration is now developing the Three Bin Kerbside System project based on separate garden organics (GO) processing until such time as industry matures and FOGO processing becomes available locally. This project would be based on households on 400sqm lots and over receiving a third GO bin (approximately 56,000 households); all other households remaining on a two bin system with the option for all other households to opt in to the three bin system.

 

As per the above Council decision of 2 July 2019, a Better Bins Kerbside Collection Application was submitted to the Waste Authority/Department of Water and Environmental Regulation on 11 July 2019.

 

A Funding Agreement offer was made to the City on 11 October 2019. The $2,520,000 grant funding offered was in line with the City’s intention to provide a FOGO service to approximately 84,000 properties, information below refers:

 

The Funding Agreement was reviewed by the City’s Legal Services and after consultations, changes to the Funding Agreement were and accepted by both DWER and the City; and an amended Funding Agreement was received on 17 December 2019.

 

Following receipt of the amended Funding Agreement, the City informed DWER of the Council decision of 10 December 2019 to implement a three bin system based on Garden Organics (GO) process and not FOGO processing; and highlighted the potential change in funding allocation as not all households would receive a third bin.

 

Administration met with DWER on 3 January 2020 to discuss the proposed changes that were required to funding agreement. DWER was satisfied that the City had fully exhausted all avenues to secure FOGO processing associated with the implementation of a Three Bin FOGO Kerbside Collection System. Administration subsequently secured the best outcome the City could achieve and obtained DWER’s agreement to provide the full $2.52M funding. DWER advised that all households (up 84,000) will receive the $30 full funding allocation per household on the proviso the City commits to transitioning to FOGO in line with the objectives of The Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2030 (State Waste Strategy and subject to market readiness). As per the proposed funding agreement, funding is allocated across three financial years as per the following the payment schedule:

 

 

A copy of the Better Bins Program Funding Agreement is provided as Attachment 1 to this report.

Consultation

Consultation has occurred with external stakeholders including the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation and Waste Authority.

Comment

In line with Council decisions, Administration has liaised with DWER on an ongoing basis and negotiated an outcome for the City which enabled the receipt of maximum funding under the Better Bins Program. It is noted that in agreeing to the provision of this funding, DWER has taken into account the City’s efforts to implement waste management solutions as per The Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2030 (State Waste Strategy); and that the City is now proposing to implement the Three Bins Kerbside Collection System based on separate Green Organics (GO) processing as responses for the tender for the Provision of Food Organics and Garden Organics Processing confirmed that the waste management industry has not developed its FOGO processing options yet.

 

It is recommended that Council endorses the Funding Agreement for Better Bins Kerbside Collection Program between the City and the State of Western Australia; and authorises the Chief Executive Officer to execute the agreement as provided in Attachment 1.

Statutory Compliance

Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act 2007, Western Australian Waste Avoidance and Resource Strategy 2030.


 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “3     Environment (Natural)

3.3    Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Waste

3.3.3  Create and promote waste management solutions

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O22 Environmental Management

High

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Planning & Sustainability

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O17 Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy and Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O21 Competitive Services Costings

High

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Community and Place

Manage

 

The above risk/s relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s Strategic/Corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

 

Council also concluded when developing their risk appetite in line with Enterprise Risk Management that it in terms of the strategic implications 3, Environmental Natural, 3.3.3 Create and promote waste management solutions, Council is prepared to accept moderate risk to reputation and financial risk in assisting and guiding a change in community perceptions and behaviours to achieve sustainable outcomes.

Policy Implications

The details and recommendation made in this report are in alignment with the Waste Management Services Policy, Strategic Waste Management Plan and Waste Local Law 2016.

Financial Implications

Subject to Council’s decisions on the recommendations made in this report, the City will receive Better Bins Program funding allocation of $2,520,000 as per the following payment schedule:

A financial analysis of the Three Bin Kerbside Collection System project has been undertaken. It is noted that there will likely be significant capital and operational expense to purchase and roll out the waste bins, including the extra annual cost of collection. Indicative financial modelling concludes the Three Bin Kerbside Collection System project will require approximately $7M capital funding and $1.2M operational funding over three financial years; appropriate funding provision including the receipt of the Better Bins Program funding allocation of $2,520,000 will be listed for Council’s consideration in the City’s annual budgets and Long Term Financial Plan.

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

 

1.         ENDORSES the Funding Agreement for Better Bins Kerbside Collection Program between the City and the State of Western Australia as referenced in this report; and

 

2.         AUTHORISES, BY ABSOLUTE MAJORITY, the Chief Executive Officer to execute the Funding Agreement for Better Bins Kerbside Collection Program between the City and the State of Western Australia.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

City of Wanneroo/Better Bins - Funding Agreement - final revision 3 Feb 2020

20/49450

 

  


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                 115

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                              124

 

Community & Place

Community Facilities

3.9    Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan

File Ref:                                              35395 – 19/470455

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       2         

 

Issue

To consider the draft Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan.

Background

Wanneroo Raceway (the Raceway) is Crown land vested under a management order to the City of Wanneroo.  The City leases the site to the WA Sporting Car Club (WASCC).  The land comprises of an area of approximately 60 hectares, being a portion of 440 (Lot 12748) Wattle Avenue, Neerabup.  The City receives an annual rent from WASCC based on a turnover formula in the lease. 

 

The WASCC has occupied the site since 1969 and more recently under a lease that commenced on 1 October 2001 for a term of 21 years which is due to expire 30 September 2022.  The permitted purpose of the site under the lease arrangement is “motor racing, any other sporting activities, any charitable or philanthropic use and any other activity involving the use of the racing circuit”. At its meeting held on 27 November 2018, Council resolved to extend the existing lease, by way of an option, for a further 11 years.

 

The WASCC oversees the management of the Raceway which is used extensively throughout the year by its members and other motoring entities, including the Perth leg of the annual V8 Supercars Australia event.  In addition to the track, the lease area comprises numerous buildings such as the media and administration centre, and pit lane and associated structures.

 

Wanneroo Raceway is identified in the State Sporting Facilities Plan (2013) as the State’s primary venue for national and international level motorsport events.  In 2009 the Department of Sport and Recreation (DSR) completed a Business Case and supporting master plan for the Raceway.  The Business Case supported State Government investment of $13.76 million to upgrade the facility and provide the minimum infrastructure to meet the needs of the V8 Super Cars Australia (V8SCA) event.  These works were completed in 2012.  The 2009 Business Case identified that demand for track time exceeds that currently available and an option existed for a second track to the north of the existing Raceway.

 

The development of the Master Plan has come about as a result of discussions which occurred in 2017 between the City’s Chief Executive Officer, the WA Sporting Car Cub and the then Director General of the Department of Sport and Recreation (now the Department of Local Government Sport and Cultural Industries – DLGSCI) in respect to the future development of the Raceway post the completion of the 2009 DSR Business Case and Master Plan report.

Detail

David Lanfear Consulting was appointed in June 2018 to undertake the development of the Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan (the Master Plan), in accordance with the 2018/19 Corporate Business Plan action.

 

The purpose of the Master Plan has been to guide the long term development of the site to enable the Raceway to become a focus of motor sport activity within WA, and to consolidate existing and potential future related activities within the one connected precinct.

 

The overall scope for the development of the Master Plan is as follows:

 

1.       Opportunities and limitations for the reconfiguration and expansion of the Raceway and associated infrastructure, using the existing site and the two Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions lots to the north;

2.       Prepare a cost plan for new and upgraded infrastructure;

3.       Development of a 10 year funding model, including routine and restorative maintenance requirements, to support the staging plan; and

4.       Review the governance and management model recommendations of the 2009 Business Case and Master Plan for the current and expanded Raceway facilities.

 

The identified Master Plan objectives are as follows:

 

·        Provision of separate, but interconnected, racing circuits for car and motor cycle racing (based on a notional multi use tracks ‘A’ and ‘B’);

·        Integrated and connected pit, administrative and ancillary facilities;

·        Considered linkages to existing motor-cross and go-kart facilities within the precinct;

·        Potential development of other motor sport and cycling facilities, including but not limited to the following:

o   Drift track;

o   Jet boat racing;

o   4WD training and rally;

o   Mountain bike trails;

o   BMX track.

·        Opportunities to link to ECU’s Motor Sport Program and motorsport opportunities within Australia and South East Asia.

·        Opportunities for the development of the site as a significant events precinct including the development of other ancillary activities which could co-exist on the current or future extended site, such as motor museum, function centre or other more visitor/family friendly attractions.

 

The methodology used in the development of the Master Plan is outlined below:

 

The draft Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan report (the Report) has been included as Attachment 1, with a copy available within the Elected Member’s Reading Room.

 

The key considerations taken into account in the development of the Master Plan included:

 

·        Wanneroo Raceway is a unique facility that has been identified as having the potential to deliver both community and economic benefit to the City;

·        The population within the Raceway’s 10km catchment will increase from 122,616 (2016) to 178,515 (2036);

·        Opportunity to attract tourism through an integrated events strategy;

·        The Raceway has an number of existing design deficiencies that will require addressing within the existing circuit;

·        The site has ageing infrastructure that is in need of improvement, in terms of both renewal and upgrades, notwithstanding required new infrastructure;

·        A number of existing environmental, water management, bush fire risk, Aboriginal heritage, planning and conservation constraints (refer to Section 3 of the Report);

·        Potential to accommodate a variety of non-motorised cycle sports, in particular the Wanneroo BMX Club; and

·        Identified a number of opportunities (based on industry benchmarking) to develop the site and surrounding land into a comprehensive motorsport and events destination.

 

The key design principles that underpinned the development of the Master Plan include:

 

·        Provision of a multi-functional extended event space which can be used by a variety of activities at one time;

·        Increase in potential use of the existing and proposed circuits by improving track split for simultaneous use, particularly for the club circuit, but also with the new proposed higher grade circuit infrastructure for attracting international events; 

·        Maximise the opportunity to develop discrete functional elements into land parcels that can be tested in the commercial market. To achieve this, the two circuits are not linked. On the basis that (and advice from the track designers) the additional cost would provide no commercial benefit. In addition, the non-compliant aspects of the existing circuit, if incorporated, would need to be addressed as the current grandfather clause would be negated;

·        A main event space between the two paddocks. The central area is designed to function like a park, with pathways, pedestrianised roads and cycle tracks that link all the major facilities together. It is this area that is recommended as being the major event area allowing access to the paddock areas, with elevated viewing in close proximity;

·        Accommodating major event populations by utilising adjacent land to the east (subject to statutory approvals and securing access by the land manager) as a large car park where people can come directly onto the site and into grandstands or walk to the central parkland area.

·        The grouping of the hotel, drivers club and museum in a central location. It is considered that the unification of these facilities could offer benefit to all, creating a hub of activity and providing the commercial motor club with catering and spa facilities from the hotel, and also with the motorsport heritage that can be found in the museum. These facilities have been grouped towards the south end of the secondary pit building where direct track access and ‘close to the action’ viewing can benefit both hotel guests and club/corporate members. The location is also closer to the main through road, providing relatively easy transport links and reducing the amount of vehicular traffic through the parkland.

·        An expanded parkland area which incorporates a number of paths and natural walkways. The intent is to ensure the parkland joins a number of activity areas via natural, parkland-style footpaths.

·        Provision of ‘Parkland’ and ‘Extreme’ zones identified on the Plan by blue and green boundaries which is intended to provide a pleasant and inviting environment where walking between events becomes part of the reason why visitors are attracted to the site.

·        The use of ‘natural’ paths to gain access to spectator areas. An example of this is in gaining access to Turn 1 of the new circuit to a temporary grandstand location overlooking one of the most exciting corners on the track.

·        Allowance for simultaneous use of the dirt oval/criterium circuit (use to be determined) with all FIA/FIM circuit permutations. This area also forms the central attraction for the extreme park and extreme park building, generating an attractive dynamic where track activity can be seen from all sides of the building. The extreme centre sits on the edge of the parkland and offers a secondary ‘club’ environment for the more extreme individual. This building should offer viewing areas, cafes and bars within walking distance to all the extreme activities.

 

Based on the potential need for additional infrastructure and to provide a development that maximises commercial opportunities, the following facility development components have been considered as part of the development of the Master Plan and have been ranked in accordance with the following priority list:

 

·        Priority 1: Essential element to drive income and sustainability of the site and/or essential club infrastructure components;

·        Priority 2: Marginal economic value but important extension of club activities;

·        Priority 3: Marginal development options to be considered. Possible future developments under investigation.

 

The following table provides a summary of key features included within the Master Plan, noting the probable cost of each priority area.

 

Development

Priority 1

Priority 2

Priority 3

FIA Grade 2 FIM Grade B Circuit, including

·      4.27 km | Main FIA Circuit

·      2.6 Km National Circuit

·      1.7 Km Club Circuit

·      Enhanced Spectator Area

·      Temporary Grandstand

·      Primary Paddock

·      Primary Pit Building

·      Secondary Paddock

·      Secondary Pit Building

·      750m Straight for Informal Drag Racing

·      Dedicated Extreme Sports Area – including speedway and/or dedicated criterium area and/or jet boat area (subject to further consideration).

Wanneroo Raceway

·      2.41km circuit with extended run-off noting Rationalise current infrastructure and improve as per previous 2009 Master Plan.

·      Links to enable existing track to be split for simultaneous use;

·      Vehicle overpass on the south side to gain entry to the central paddock area within impacting on users;

·      Temporary grandstand;

·      Existing hospitality;

·      Existing pedestrian overpass.

 

 

Driver experience centre

·      Operate within the existing Wanneroo Raceway circuit and where necessary be closed off to run as a separate smaller circuit.

·      Include pit lane, operations building, dynamic pad (180m x 60m), skid pan, irrigated kick plate, land change and 1.11km handling circuit.

 

 

Off Road Facilities

·      Integrating the existing FIM Motocross circuit within an extreme sport zone

·      Multi-Use Off Road Area

·      Dirt Speedway Oval (cars);

·      Alternative use of the speedway site for a criterium circuit.

·      Off road trails.

Non-automotive facilities

·      Existing Infrastructure and Storage – upgrade, refurbishment and eventual replacement;

·      Open Parkland;

·      Hotel;

·      Luxury Villas;

·      Potential Amphitheatre Location(s);

·      Commercial / Retail Units;

·      Extreme Park Welcome Centre;

·      BMX Track;

·      Pump Track;

·      Camping Area and Event Parking;

·      Existing Natural Trails;

·      Motor Museum;

·      Automotive Club House;

·      Infield Jet Boat Area;

·      Mountain Bike opportunities via existing trail networks.

Ancillary facilities

·      Site Welcome Structure ;

·      Parking Area ;

·      Protected Bushland;

·      Primary Access ;

·      Secondary Access;

 

 

COST

$183,436,175

$33,695,598

$13,898,002

 

Overall, the total estimate of probable cost is $231M, noting that each area of development will be subject to detailed business cases and feasibility studies.

 

Section 9 of the Report considers funding options, with the development of Public Private Partnerships and Private Sector Investment being the main focus. The indicative implementation plan for the Master Plan (Section 10 of the Report) has been included within Attachment 2, and identifies an 11 phase process from 2019 to 2030. This table also identifies high level responsibilities in respect to the project phases.

 

It should be noted that the role of the City will primarily be to advocate and facilitate the implementation of the Master Plan, noting that the Master Plan will be used to seek support at State and Federal Government levels and to further explore and develop partnership opportunities for infrastructure development.

 

Consultation

The development of the Master Plan included consultation with the following stakeholders:

 

·        Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries;

·        Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions;

·        Tourism WA (attempted);

·        WA Sporting Car Club;

·        Wanneroo BMX Club;

·        Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS);

·        Motorcycling WA (MWA);

·        Australian Drag Racing Association (ADRA);

·        Westcycle;

·        BMX WA;

·        Edith Cowan University; and

·        Queensland Raceway.

 

The consultation outputs have been outlined within Section 4 of the Report.

 

Following Elected Member’s consideration of the draft Master Plan in June 2019, Administration undertook specific stakeholder engagement with the WA Sporting Car Club and the Wanneroo BMX Club. The outcomes of this stakeholder engagement were as follows.

 

WA Sporting Car Club

Administration met with the President and General Manager of the WA Sporting Car Club on 14 August 2019. Administration was represented by the Chief Executive Officer, Director Community and Place, Executive Manager Governance and Legal and the Manager Community Facilities. Mr David Lanfear, from David Lanfear Consulting was also present and provided the WA Sporting Car Club representatives with an overview of the Master Plan, in terms of the process and key outcomes.

 

Overall the WA Sporting Car Club indicated their strong support for the proposed Master Plan and in supporting the City of Wanneroo in the implementation of the Master Plan.

 

Wanneroo BMX Club

Administration met with the Committee of the Wanneroo BMX Club on 5 September 2019, with Administration being represented by the Manager Community Facilities. Mr David Lanfear, from David Lanfear Consulting was also present and provided the Committee with an overview of the Master Plan, in terms of the process and key outcomes.

 

Overall, the Wanneroo BMX Club were very supportive of the draft Master Plan and in particular in regards to the future re-location of the Club to the Wanneroo Raceway site. Key considerations for the Club were the timeframes associated with the relocation of the club and the management and upkeep of its existing facilities in the period until their re-location. Discussions with the Club in this regard were based on an indicative re-location timeframe of 10 years. Administration continues to work with the Club in respect to interim facility upgrades which are seen as been of a critical nature to its continued operations at the current site.

 

Feedback received from Elected Members has identified consideration of an underpass (as opposed to the current proposed overpass) at the southern end of the existing track and the provision of fixed grandstands rather than the temporary option currently identified within the plan.  These options will be considered when the Master Plan moves to a more detailed level of design in the future.

 

This report will seek approval for the release of the draft Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan for the purposes of a 42 day public comment process, which is to include the following consultation strategy:

 

·    Information provided on the City’s “Your Say” page;

·    Advertising for feedback on the City’s various social media platforms;

·    Direct communication with relevant stakeholders, as identified above; and

·    Consideration by the Wanneroo Business and Tourism Development Working Group.

 

The public comment period will commence on 30 March 2020 and conclude on 10 May 2020. The outcomes of public comment period will be reported back to Council for consideration and for Council’s formal adoption of the Master Plan.

Comment

The Master Plan provides a clear indication of the possible future expansion and development opportunities at the Wanneroo Raceway and the State Government land to the north of the existing site. The Master Plan shows that the City has a unique opportunity in this regard to not only further advance existing motor sport activities (bitumen based four wheel and two wheel), but to also accommodate other forms of motor sport activity, non-automotive sporting activity, commercial, event and community outcomes.

 

Critically, the implementation of the Master Plan will be dependent on the buy-in and support of the key stakeholders identified within the Master Plan process.

 

It should also be noted that the identification and development of key public private partnerships and private sector investment will also be fundamental to the successful implementation of the Master Plan.

 

Given the scale of the proposed development and the significance of the Master Plan to not only the City but also to bitumen based motor sport in WA, it is proposed that Administration will develop an advocacy campaign for the development of the Raceway once the Master Plan has been endorsed by Council. This plan would work alongside the indicative implementation plan outlined within the Report. This advocacy campaign will include the development of an Fact Sheet for Council’s approval, providing an overview of the proposal, need, benefits, consequences of non-delivery, current project status, indicative budget implications and what is required (the “ask”). Key steps within this process will include the following:

 

·        State Government and WASCC endorsement of the draft Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan;

·        Advocate to the State Government to secure the land parcels to the north of the existing raceway;

·        City of Wanneroo partner with the State Government in respect to investment attraction.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.2  Facilitate opportunities within the City to access peak and elite activities

“2      Economy

2.4   Place of Destination

2.4.1 Actively build on cultural heritage and distinctive identity to promote Wanneroo as a place to visit”

“3      Built Environment

3.4     Activated Places

3.4.2 Provide safe spaces, centre and facilities through our infrastructure management designs for community benefit and recreation”

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Long Term Financial Planning

Low

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Stakeholder Relationships

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Chief Executive Officer

Manage

The above risks relating to the issues contained within this report have been identified within the City’s Strategic and corporate risk registers. Action plans have been developed, within the Master Plan to manage these risks to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

As outlined within the Report, the total estimate of probable cost is $231M, which has been itemised based on priority areas as per the table below.

 

Priority 1 Items

$183,436,175

Priority 2 Items

$33,695,598

Priority 3 Items

$13,898,002

Total

$231,029,775

 

It should be noted that at this point in time no provision has been made for the above costs in the long-term financial plan, noting also the Report’s consideration of funding options, with the development of Public Private Partnerships and Private Sector Investment being the main focus

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       ENDORSES, for the purposes of public comment, the draft Wanneroo Raceway Master plan, as shown in Attachment 1 of this report; and

2.       NOTES that the draft Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan will be released for a 42 day public comment period from 30 March 2020 to 10 May 2020, with the outcome to be reported to Council at its meeting held on 30 June 2020.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan - May 2019

20/75826

Minuted

2.

Implementation Plan

19/216843

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                             125

 

Attachment 1 – Wanneroo Raceway Master Plan – May 2019

This attachment is currently available on the City’s Web site through the following link:

Click here to access Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administration Use only

Attachment 1 – HPE # 19/212630


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                              130

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                              145

3.10  Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review

File Ref:                                              37000 – 20/52741

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       6  

Previous Items:                                   PS02-02/12 - Finalisation of Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan - Ordinary Council - 07 Feb 2012 7.00pm      

 

Issue

To consider the draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review (the Review).

Background

In 2010, Administration prepared a Community Facilities Plan (CFP) for the Alkimos/ Eglinton and Yanchep/ Two Rocks District Structure Plan areas that comprise the Northern Coastal Growth Corridor (NCGC). The CFP identified the required level of community facility provision and the proposed location and staging of these facilities within the NCGC in response to projected population growth.

 

The CFP was adopted by Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting held on 7 February 2012 (PS02-02/12), and has since served as the guiding document for facility provision in the NCGC and informed the Developer Contribution Plans (DCP’s) for Alkimos/ Eglington and Yanchep/ Two Rocks.

 

In order to ensure the plan continues to be appropriate for the area, Administration commenced a review of the existing CFP in March 2019, with the view of the reviewed CFP informing the five year review of the DCP’s.

Detail

David Lanfear Consulting was appointed in March 2019 to undertake the review of the CFP. The overall scope was to review the existing CFP in respect to the following:

 

·        The demographic profile of the northern coastal growth corridor;

·        Standards of Provision and Community Facility Hierarchy (CFH);

·        Community facility provision principles;

·        Community facility provision (existing and proposed);

·        Community facility models and cost estimates;

·        Proposed facility staging; and

·        Community facility costings (for duration of the CFP).

 

Specific considerations in respect to each element of the scope are summarised as per the following:

 

·        Review the demographic profile of the NCGC:

o   Historic and forecasted trends across the City related to population levels, density and distribution, age, gender, number of households, ethnicity and socio-economic levels etc.; and

o   Report on projected demographic changes and establish the implications for future Public Open Space (POS) and community facility development within the NCGC.

 

·        Standards of Provision and CFH:

o   Undertake a review of industry based community facilities/infrastructure standards (ratios) of provision against the existing Standards of Provision and CFH contained within the CFP, to determine if the City’s adopted standards and hierarchy remain current, making suitable recommendations; and

o   Review future population levels for the NCGC to determine approximate future levels of provision and extrapolate the expected year of development.

 

·        Community facility provision principles:

o   Review the existing facility provision principles as outlined within the adopted CFP in respect to relevance (now and into the future) and against existing industry principles and guidelines.

 

·        Community facility provision (existing and proposed):

o   Review and audit existing community facilities, documenting in broad terms the status of the existing facility and implications in respect to future provision or replacement (e.g. facility lifecycle assessment);

o   Review future provision outlined within the CFP in respect to existing provision and outcomes in respect to the analysis of population and demographics, facility provision principles, facility hierarchy, facility provision principles and standards of provision; and

o   Review of approved district and local structure plans in respect to amendments made post the adoption of the CFP.

 

·        Community facility models and cost estimates:

o   Review existing Community Facility Models in respect to providing contemporary facilities which support service needs for current and future communities; and

o   Review the existing NCGC Facilities Plan - Cost Report, providing cost estimates based on 2019 construction rates and review of base assumptions.

 

·        Proposed facility staging: 

o   Review community facility staging scenarios as outlined within the existing CFP, in respect to the outcomes of the existing analysis and make recommendations.

 

·        Community facility costings (for duration of the CFP):

o   Review and represent the cost implications for the provision of the proposed community facilities, over the duration of the plan, by facility hierarchy category and facility type;  and

o   Identification and assessment of potential funding sources and sensitivity analysis of these sources.

 

The methodology used for the development of the review is outlined below:

The draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review has been included as Attachment 1, with a copy available in the Elected Members Reading Room.

 

Guiding Principles

The guiding principles under which the Review has been undertaken follow a similar approach to that identified in the 2012 CFP, and include the following:

·           Equality of access to all members of the community;

·           Developing a sound evidence base to identify both perceived and normative need;

·           Ensuring that, wherever possible, the capacity of existing infrastructure is maximised having regard to design and operational limitations;

·           Co-locating and rationalising infrastructure to minimise cost and maximise the effective sharing of limited resources;

·           Integrating, wherever possible, community facilities with land use and transport planning in an environmentally sustainable way and by entering into partnership with alternative service providers to develop alternative and cost-effective delivery models;

·           Ensuring community facilities are planned and delivered in a timely manner which is flexible to changing demographic and development profiles; and

·           Facilities to be designed and located to cater for all members. 

 

City of Wanneroo Strategic Influences

Key factors identified by the Review in the context of current documentation include:

 

·        A key focus of future investment is to meet the needs of projected future residents of the NCGC;

·        The ability to have a choice of infrastructure and services is important for such a diverse population base and for a combined urban and rural setting;

·        The development of regional sporting infrastructure, including an aquatic centre and indoor courts will need to be considered;

·        It is evident from the structure planning process undertaken that there is likely to be a more intense and higher density development along the coastal corridor than that which was previously envisaged;

·        Connectivity between sites is important in order to maintain a high level of social integration across all ages and users;

·        The close proximity of community facilities to activity centres (e.g. retail, transport hubs and other commercial areas) is important;

·        The role of local government in facilitating the provision of services (through access to infrastructure) at an appropriate level to enable other service providers to deliver what the community is identifying as a need; and

·        The growth in female sport which is requiring an alternative approach to the design and development of changing facility infrastructure to be far more diverse and inclusive.

 


 

Standards of Provision

The Review considered the POS Classifications developed by the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries (DLGSCI) in respect to classification function, purpose and description and also by hierarchy and catchment, as per the tables below.

 

·        POS Classification by function, purpose and description:

Function

Purpose

Description

Recreation Spaces

Recreation spaces provide a setting for informal play and physical activity, relaxation and social interaction.

Recreation spaces enhance physical and mental health through activity that provides relaxation, amusement or stimulation.

Recreation spaces can be accessed by all to play, socialise, exercise, celebrate or participate in other activities that provide personal satisfaction or intrinsic reward.

Sport Spaces

Sport spaces provide a setting for formal structured sporting activities.

Sport spaces provide a venue for formal structured sporting activities such as team competitions, physical skill development and training.

Sport spaces are designed to accommodate playing surface, buffer zones and infrastructure requirements of specific or general sporting activity.

Most sport spaces can also be accessed by community members for informal sport and recreation.

Nature Spaces

Nature spaces provide a setting where people can enjoy nearby nature and protect local biodiversity and natural area values

Nature spaces provide opportunity for low-impact recreational activities, such as walking, cycling, picnicking, playing, watching or exploring natural features. Nature spaces may include bushland, coastal areas, wetlands and riparian habitats, and geological and natural features.

Sites are managed to enable recreational access while protecting local ecological and biodiversity values.

 

·        POS hierarchy by description and catchment:

Level

Description

DLGCS

Catchment

2011 Catchment

Regional

Regional Open Space (ROS) serves one or more geographical or social regions and is likely to attract visitors from outside any one local government area.

Size is variable and dependent on function

Catering for 50,000+ people or more with a catchment radius that extends across two or more districts (10km+).

District

Be located central to the catchment to maximise accessibility.

Consist of sufficient space to accommodate a variety of concurrent uses, including organised sports, children's play, picnicking, exercising the dog, social gatherings and individual activities

5ha to 15+ha

Within 2 kilometres or 5-minute drive

catering for 20,000 – 30,000 people, with a catchment radius of 5-10km that encompasses several local or neighbourhood centres

Neighbourhood

Neighbourhood Open Space (NOS) serves as the recreational and social focus of a community. Residents are attracted by the variety of features and facilities and opportunities to socialise.

1ha to 5ha

Be central to surrounding neighbourhoods

Local: Small to medium scale facilities that primarily meet the needs of the immediate surrounding community.

Local

Local Open Space (LOS) is usually small parklands that service the recreation needs of the immediate residential population.

LOS is primarily used for recreation and may include small areas of nature space.

0.4ha to 1ha

Within 400 metres or 5-minute walk

 

As a result of this analysis, the Review recommends that the DLGSCI Classification Framework should be adopted for the CFP. It should be noted there are some differences in the framework currently adopted by the City. These largely relate to size and catchment areas. The City’s guidelines are outlined in Local Planning Policy 4.3: Public Open Space.

 

In respect to Community Facility Provision, the Review provides a detailed review (refer  Section 4.2) of existing Community Facility Classification Framework and recommendations as it relates to the provision of regional, district and local level infrastructure provision. This analysis was undertaken using the Parks and Leisure WA Community Facility Guidelines 2012 (revised draft 2019) and is informed by the DLGSCI Classification Framework as noted above.

 

In addition to this, the Review also provides additional Community Facility Classifications (refer Section 4.3), as it relates to infrastructure such as skate parks, BMX facilities, cycling facilities, performing arts facilities etc.

 

The combination of these POS and Community Facility Classification Frameworks form the basis of the POS and community facility provision recommended by the Review.

 

Population Growth and Demographic Analysis

The demographic analysis undertaken by the Review utilised the following data sources:

·        Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016 Census;

·        Community Profile and Social Access;

·        Forecast.id for the City’s Local Government Area; and

·        WA Tomorrow (2015).

 

The analysis focussed on the current population profile and future population growth, age composition and components of population change. Future population growth for the NCGC has been summarised within the table below (refer Page 36 of the Review):

The following aspects are key considerations in the development of community infrastructure having regard to population growth and potential future use:

 

·        Population projections indicate a complex demographic mix where there is a growing ageing population over time but an immediate need to address required demands of a significant youth population which shows a high degree of disaffection currently;

·        Established rural areas will see a growth in people ageing in place, whereas the new developing areas will experience a higher influx of younger working age households. In order to support these households, access to child and family support will be important as will the growth in access to sporting infrastructure and readily accessible public open space/ safe beaches;

·        There are significant demographic variances projected across all of the suburb areas and it is not possible to incorporate a bland population driven assessment which identifies a suite of new community facilities which should be developed in each suburb area;

·        There are some community facility deficiency issues emerging in the outer-lying areas of Butler and Jindalee, which if repeated in the NCGC will give rise to a significant deficit in infrastructure. This will adversely impact on social connectivity and the viability of new communities;

·        The importance of support infrastructure for family units and increase in accessibility to sporting infrastructure will be high in all growth communities due to the relatively young demographic anticipated in all identified new development areas, due in part to the relatively low cost and mix of residential unit sizes;

·        In all growth communities, the initial growth in young families and high family units in the southern part of the NCGC will see a higher level of retirees emerge which, as a percentage of the population, becomes gradually more dominant; and

·        The growth to 2041 in and around Yanchep and Two Rocks does not fully articulate the overall development potential to full build out. Allocation of land for community infrastructure will need to recognise a population which is likely to grow within the catchment of the two suburbs by a further 100%.

 

Trends in Community Facilities Provision and Use

The analysis of trends in relation to community facility provision and use considered a number of key areas including:

 

Generic Trends

·        Pressures facing community groups in declining volunteerism and increased risk management and governance;

·        The need for modern facilities to meet statutory building requirements;

·        The importance of considering full life cycle costs is becoming increasingly critical in budget planning;

·        Increasing expectations of the community as it relates to the quality of infrastructure;

·        The value of community facilities in providing a social land community resource (community hubs);

·        The increasing use of information technology to connect people across spatial and activity areas;

·        The lack of space and availability of space at a reasonable cost; and

·        The trend towards commercialising aspects of community facilities and services to assist in offsetting operational costs.

 

Design Principles

·        A coordinated network of facilities within the context of a defined facility hierarchy;

·        Facility provision should be central to catchment and equitable access;

·        Facilities should be located to promote visibility and accessibility;

·        Integrated/ co-located;

·        Multiple-use;

·        Responding to social need;

·        Inclusive and welcoming;

·        Contributing to the public domain and sense of place;

·        Proximity to open space for activities and events;

·        Connected to public transport, pedestrian and cycle network;

·        Be of sufficient size and design to enable expansion and adaptation;

·        Financial sustainability;

·        Environmental sustainability;

·        Safety and security; and

·        Master planned.

 

In addition to this, the Review also considers trends in respect to delivery models (development of community hubs, community facilities providing a range of integrated and compatible services etc.), sport and recreation facility trends, and trends as it relates to museums, cultural centres, Men’s Sheds, community gardens etc.

 

As far as delivery models, the Review recommends the community hub models as the preferred solution to ensure the level of infrastructure provided can achieve an optimum return on investment. Increased flexibility and access to the widest range of community groups should be the objective within all these facilities.

 

Current Facility Infrastructure Provision

The Review provides a thorough outline of the existing facility provision within the NCGC, with the following summary conclusions identified:

 

·        Current provision responds to the existing road network and future planning assumes a level of accessibility (although not fully formulated as yet). There will be a need to review accessibility on an ongoing basis;

·        Provision is generally catching up with development with very little community infrastructure, with the exception of the Yanchep Active Open Space and Yanchep Surf Lifesaving Club, having been developed in advance of development. This is obviously a concern as DCP investment is reliant on lot development trigger points;

·        The NCGC is linear in its development and therefore many catchments will be compromised. It is important to consider a variety of assessments related to known participation rates, levels of population growth, accessibility and benchmarking to inform assessment process and recommended facility development requirements. A solely population-driven analysis will not provide the desired facility infrastructure;

·        The extent of school infrastructure is high and there will be a need to consider more extensive shared use/ dual use agreements to maximise return on investment and off-set excessive capitalisation in additional assets. This is particularly important to offset the provision of:

o   Indoor courts;

o   Outdoor courts; and

o   Performing arts.

·        All of the above infrastructure is potentially available for public use outside of core school hours and would be subject to agreements which incorporate a degree of flexibility and potential cost sharing;

·        The Phil Renkin Centre and Library is ageing and in need of replacement. This would need to be factored into any future facility development;

·        Oldham Reserve and St Andrews will all require effective master planning to maximise their use and increase functionality as active reserves and will need to be factored into any future investment and new active reserve development;  and

·           Yanchep Community Centre will provide limited functionality to service future anticipated growth. There will be a need to provide a replacement multi-functional facility within close proximity to support future growth.

 

Projected Demand Indicators

 

The assessment of future demand for facility provision within the NCGC has been undertaken using a standards approach based on the Facility Planning Guidelines developed by Parks and Leisure WA and from a participation perspective using the most recent AusPlay (Sports Australia) data.

 

The outcome of the standards approach demand assessment has been included within Attachment 2, which is further supported by Appendix E within the Review report.

 

In respect to the participation approach, the Review undertook this assessment based on projected participation across the top 10 sporting activities by adults and children. Consideration was also given to the percentage of the population between the ages of 5 and 49, which are considered to be predominant sporting facility users. This has been provided in a graphical format within Attachment 3.

 

Key outcomes of this analysis included:

 

·        The growth profile of the 5 to 49 age cohort, indicates a high degree of potential club-based activity and therefore demand;

·        Of the traditional outdoor pitch-based team sports, there would be high demand to service the needs of children aged between 0-14 across the NCGC for soccer, Australian football, cricket and hockey. Usage numbers projected need to be considered against a potential number of teams, training requirements and competition requirements;

·        Of the traditional court sports, there is a relatively high demand to service the needs of children aged between 0-14 across the NCGC for basketball, netball and tennis;

·        Other high demand activities are dancing, gymnastics and swimming;

·        Dancing, netball and gymnastics are dominated by female participation while football/soccer, Australian rules and cricket are dominated by male participation. The remainder of the sports is relatively evenly split, although tennis does indicate male participation is twice that of female participation;

·        Of the traditional outdoor pitch-based team sports, there would be high demand to service the needs of adults over 14 across the NCGC for soccer, Australian football and cricket. Usage numbers projected need to be considered against a potential number of teams, training requirements and competition requirements;

·        Of the traditional court sports, there is a relatively high demand to service the needs of adults over 14 across the NCGC for basketball, netball, volleyball and tennis;

·        Fitness/gym is the main sporting activity amongst adults which needs to be accommodated across the City with overall participation estimated at 28.9% across the population. This is over three times the next core activity of swimming (9.2%) and eight times that of other sporting activity. Females are more likely to demand such provision with a 33.9% participation rate compared to a 24% participation rate amongst males;

·        Other high demand activities are yoga, golf, Pilates, athletics (including jogging), walking and bowls;

·        Yoga, Pilates, netball and swimming are dominated by female participation while football/soccer, Australian rules, golf, basketball and cricket are dominated by male participation. The remainder of the sports and activities are either relatively low in participation across both sexes, or are relatively evenly split; and

·        For adult participation, the sports of rugby union, rugby league and hockey operate at a sub-regional level and will operate outside of normal local government boundaries. These sports are not to be ignored, but the demand identified in accordance with specific local circumstance may give rise to a unique level of demand.

 

The Review then considered this demand analysis within the context of playing surface demand for training and match play (on an hourly basis) for both children and adult players, which then was translated into potential facility need based on population and participation data. This information is provided within Attachment 4.

 

Additional demand assessment was also undertaken for discrete community facilities including aquatic facilities, coastal swimming pools, basketball and netball facilities, Men’s Shed provision and synthetic hockey pitch provision.

 

In respect to aquatic facility demand, the report found that:

 

·        Swimming across all age ranges is in high demand. The increase in child participation from 2016 to 2041 is estimated to be over 8,266 with the majority of these likely to participate in learn to swim and squad development programs. Adult participation in the same period is estimated at 7,725. Sufficient capacity needs to be available within the available water space in the NCGC to accommodate such growth;

·        Based on a CERM PI (University of South Australia Performance Indicator benchmarking) it suggests a footfall of between 5 and 7 visits per head of population for aquatic centres within a 5km population catchment; and

·        This would necessitate, an indoor aquatic facility capacity to service the NCGC of between 202,245 and 283,143 users (based on the 2021 population projections) and between 552,275 and 773,185 (based on 2036 population projections) and between 670,375 and 938,525 (based on 2041 population projections). This would necessitate a regional level aquatic facility to be in place to service the NCGC by 2036. It would also indicate a district level facility may also be required to cater for the projected population growth and catchment of the southern NCGC by 2041 onwards.

 

Community Facility Requirements – Conclusion and Recommendations

The summary of overall conclusion relating to community facility requirements has been provided within Attachment 5 and provides an overview of facility requirements.

 

The full suite of draft recommendations have been provided within Attachment 6 and include the following:

 

·        Minimum spatial requirements for sporting infrastructure, including AFL, soccer, cricket, hockey, rugby, baseball/ softball, tennis, bowling, athletics, netball and basketball; and

·        Policy, process and strategic interventions relating to future investment in multi-purpose facilities, adoption of guiding principles, adoption of standards of provision, financial model for facility development, accessibility, floodlighting provision, provision of gender neutral changing facilities as a standard, skate park and informal BMX provision, dog exercise provision, community use of school sites, consideration of alternative service providers and development of partnerships (commercial and not-for-profit).

 

Attachment 6 also includes Table 21 from the Review report which outlines suburb specific recommendations as it relates to facility provision, which has been summarised as follows:

 

Alkimos:

·        Libraries – provision of a regional facility will be required at the Alkimos Secondary Centre by 2026;

·        Community Centres – provision of a regional facilities at the Alkimos Secondary Centre by 2026, with district level provision in 2029 and neighbourhood level provision (x4) between 2020 and 2034 in East Alkimos and the Alkimos Secondary Centre;

·        Youth, Cultural and Performing Arts – provision of a district youth centre/space in the Alkimos Secondary Centre by 2026, with provision of district level performing arts and cultural centres in the secondary centre being aligned to school development in the area;

·        Regional surf lifesaving club – development of one facility at the Alkimos South Coastal Village;

·        Sport/Recreation spaces – provision of three district sport spaces, five neighbourhood spaces between 2023 and 2032 and a regional sport space subject to land availability;

·        Leisure centre – provision of an indoor aquatic and recreation centre (regional/district level) by 2026 at either the Alkimos Secondary Centre or East Alkimos;

·        Courts and Synthetic Surfaces – development of a regional (6 court) indoor basketball court facility and four court (outdoor) netball facility by 2026; and

·        Other facilities – development of neighbourhood level skate and BMX facilities based on an agreed facility provision strategy, district tennis facility and a lawn bowls facility in East Alkimos by 2024-26.

 

Eglington:

·        Libraries – provision of a district-level facility will be required at the Eglington District Centre by 2031;

·        Community Centres – provision of a district facility at the Eglington District Centre by 2031, with neighbourhood level provision (x3) between 2028 and 2039 in North Eglinton;

·        Youth, Cultural and Performing Arts – provision of a district youth centre/space in the Eglinton District Centre by 2031, with provision of district level performing arts and cultural centres in North Eglinton being aligned to school development in the area;

·        Sport/Recreation spaces – provision of a district sport space, and two neighbourhood spaces between 2023 and 2034;

·        Courts and Synthetic Surfaces – development of a district (3 to 4 courts) indoor basketball court facility and six court (outdoor) netball facility by 2031; and

·        Other facilities – development of neighbourhood level skate and BMX facilities based on an agreed facility provision strategy, district tennis facility and a lawn bowls facility in Eglinton District Centre and North Eglinton by 2025-41.

 

Yanchep:

·        Libraries – provision of a regional facility will be required at the Yanchep Metropolitan Centre by 2036;

·        Community Centres – provision of a regional facilities at the Yanchep Metropolitan Centre by 2026, with 2 x district level provision in 2032 and beyond 2041 and neighbourhood level provision (x 5) between 2022 and beyond 2041 in Yanchep Metropolitan Centre, North Yanchep Activity Centre and West Yanchep Activity Centre;

·        Youth, Cultural and Performing Arts – provision of a district youth centre/space in the Yanchep Metropolitan Centre by 2036, with provision of district level performing arts and cultural centres in the metropolitan centre being aligned to school development in the area;

·        Sport/Recreation spaces – provision of two additional district sport spaces between 3024 and 2041, five neighbourhood spaces between 2026 and 2041 and a regional sport space subject to land availability;

·        Leisure centre – provision of an indoor aquatic and recreation centre (regional/district level) by 2036 at the Yanchep Metropolitan Centre or within close proximity;

·        Courts and Synthetic Surfaces – development of a regional (6 to 8 court) indoor basketball court facility and 8 to 16 court (outdoor) netball facility commencing in 2026 and expanding in 2036; and

·        Other facilities – development of neighbourhood level skate and BMX facilities based on an agreed facility provision strategy, regional tennis facility and a lawn bowls facility in North Yanchep Activity Centre by 2034-36.

 

Two Rocks:

·        Libraries – provision of a district-level facility will be required at the Two Rocks Coastal Centre by 2031;

·        Community Centres – provision of a district facility at the Two Rocks Coastal Centre by 2031, with neighbourhood level provision (x3) between 2036 and 2041 in the Two Rocks Coastal Centre and North Two Rocks Activity Centre;

·        Youth, Cultural and Performing Arts – provision of a two district youth centre/space in various potential locations by 2031, with provision of district level performing arts and cultural centres in Two Rocks North Secondary Centre being aligned to school development in the area;

·        Sport/Recreation spaces – provision of two district sport spaces and three neighbourhood spaces between 2026 and 2039 and a regional sport space subject to land availability;

·        Courts and Synthetic Surfaces – development of a district (3 to 4 courts) indoor basketball court facility and six court (outdoor) netball facility by 2031; and

·        Other facilities – development of neighbourhood level skate and BMX facilities based on an agreed facility provision strategy and a district tennis facility Two Rocks North Secondary Centre by 2038-2040.

Consultation

The review was conducted in consultation with the following external stakeholders:

 

·        Department of Education;

·        State Sporting Associations:

o   Aquatic Sports;

o   Bowls WA;

o   Hockey WA;

o   Football West;

o   West Australian Football Commission;

o   Softball WA;

o   Baseball WA;

o   Volleyball WA;

o   Athletics WA;

o   Little Athletics WA;

o   Rugby WA;

o   WA Rugby League;

o   Gymnastics WA;

o   Netball WA;

o   Basketball WA;

o   Tennis West;

o   Westcycle; and

o   Western Australian Cricket Association.

 

The above entities have contributed towards the recommendations within the report.

 

This report will seek approval for the release of the draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan for the purposes of a 28 day public comment process, which is to include the following consultation strategy:

 

·        Information provided on the City’s “Your Say” page;

·        Advertising for feedback on the City’s various social media platforms;

·        Direct communication with relevant stakeholders, as identified above; and

·        Workshop with Developers within the northern coastal corridor.

 

The public comment period will commence on 30 March 2020 and conclude on 26 April 2020. The outcomes of public comment period will be reported back to Council for consideration and for Council’s formal adoption of the Master Plan.

 

Should any projects be derived from the review, the City will engage the community in separate consultations, dependant on the needs of each project. These consultations will be conducted as per the City’s Community Engagement Framework.

Comment

Overall the Review provides clear indications as to the level of facility provision that is and will be required in the future. Given the population growth the area has experienced since the publication of the 2012 CFP, it is apparent the City needs to ensure that provision of community infrastructure is appropriate for current levels of need.

 

There is considerable future need for facilities identified in the plan. With this in mind, the City should ensure the recommended dates for facility provision indicated in the plan are adhered to, particularly in regards to larger facilities (e.g. district and regional level).

 

The plan recommends more than eighty separate facilities to be constructed in the NCGC over the duration of the CFP. It should be noted that this includes several projects that could be incorporated into the same facility e.g. community centres and indoor recreation spaces. Multiuse facilities, such as the potential Regional Aquatic and Recreation Centre would be beneficial as it would serve to provide for several of the recommended facilities, particularly in the near future.

 

In addition, the City should continue to lobby State and Federal governments in regards to the upcoming provision of the site for the mooted Alkimos Regional Open Space (AROS). A 50ha site, such as AROS would prove beneficial in ensuring the current and future provision requirements are met in the short to medium term. The City is currently working on the development of a business case to the State Government to commence acquisition of the AROS.

 

There is also sufficient detail in the Review to provide a clear indication that there is an identifiable need for the staged provision of a regional aquatic and recreation facility within the northern coastal corridor. The population of the NCGC is currently at a point, particularly considering the young demographic, where an aquatic facility with supporting indoor sports hall would be meet the needs of the community and be adequately utilised (based on population and participation estimates) over time.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.1  Create opportunities that encourage community wellbeing and active and healthy lifestyles

 

1.1.2 Facilitate Opportunities within the City to access peak and elite activities”

 

“2      Economy

2.4   Place of Destination

2.4.1 Actively build on cultural heritage and distinctive identity to promote Wanneroo as a place to visit”

 

“3      Built Environment

3.4     Activated Places

 

3.4.2 Provide safe spaces, centre and facilities through our infrastructure management designs for community benefit and recreation”

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Long Term Financial Planning

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Stakeholder Relationships

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Chief Executive Officer

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Productive Communities

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Community and Place

Manage

 

The above risks relating to the issues contained within this report have been identified within the City’s Strategic and Corporate risk registers. Action plans have been developed, within the Master Plan to manage these risks to improve the existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

As outlined in the report and its attachments, the total estimate of costs is circa $683M over the 21 years of the draft report timeline. This is broken down into suburbs below:

 

Suburb

Amount

Alkimos

$197,979,085

Eglinton

$107,114,190

Two Rocks

$118,012,427

Yanchep

$260,535,880

Total

$683,641,582

 

In terms of timeframes, the five year breakdown as indicated on the draft report is provided below:

Period

Years

Amount

1

2019/20 to 24/25

$37,168,500

2

2025/26 to 29/30

$200,680,720

3

2030/31 to 2034/35

$170,817,802

4

2035/36 to 2040/41

$274,974,560

Total

$683,641,582

 

It should be noted that there are additional costs that have not yet been considered, and they will impact the costing figures. It is anticipated these final costs will be included in the final version of the review.

 

As outlined in the table below, the Review has seen an increase in funding requirements from the initial plan in 2012 to 2020 of more than $170M. It should be noted that the 2012 figures include only Regional and District Facilities, whereas the Review’s figures include smaller, neighbourhood facilities in addition to the Regional and District facilities.

 

NCGC Community Facilities Plan Year

Alkimos / Eglinton

Yanchep /

Two Rocks

Total

2012

$122,375,023

$389,909,534

$512,284,557

2020

$305,093,307

$378,548,307

$683,641,614

 

According to the City’s current Long Term Financial Plan, there is approximately $97M allocated to the provision of sporting facilities in the Northern Corridor. As indicated in the draft review, there is significant additional funding that will be required over the life of the CFP.  It should be noted the City will need to investigate potential external funding sources in order to ensure the minimum facility requirements are met in the short, medium and long term.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority


 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       ENDORSES, for the purposes of public comment, the draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review, as shown in Attachment 1 of this report; and

2.       NOTES that the draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review will be released for a 28 day public comment period from 30 March  to 26 April 2020, with the outcome to be reported to Council at its meeting held on 30 June 2020.

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review

20/75788

Minuted

2.

NCGC CFP Review - Projected Community Facility Requirements

20/10560

 

3.

NCGC CFP Review - Projected Participation and Population Figures

20/10571

 

4.

NCGC CFP Review - Projected Demand and Current & Future Provision Requirement

20/10625

 

5.

NCGC CFP Review - Community Facility Requirements Table

20/10641

 

6.

NCGC CFP Review - Recommendations

20/12357

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                             146

Attachment 1 –  Draft Northern Coastal Growth Corridor Community Facilities Plan Review

This attachment is currently available on the City’s Web site through the following link:

Click here to access Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administration Use only

Attachment 1 – HPE # 20/26576


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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                              183

3.11  Outcomes of the 2019 Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund

File Ref:                                              21392V02 – 20/56944

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil

Previous Items:                                   CP01-09/19 - Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) - 2020/21 Funding Round - Ordinary Council - 24 Sep 2019       

 

Issue

To consider the outcomes of the Department of Local Government, Sports and Cultural Industries (DLGSCI) Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) 2019 grant round.

Background

Through the CSRFF grant, DLGSCI allocated $9.35M (annual and forward planning) for the 2019 round to provide financial assistance to community groups and Local Governments to develop basic infrastructure for sport and recreation. The program aims to increase participation in sport and recreation with an emphasis on increasing physical activity, through the development of sustainable, good quality, well-designed and well-utilised facilities.

 

At its meeting held on 24 September 2019, Council considered report CP01-09/19 and resolved the following:

 

That Council:

 

1.       SUBMITS the following Community Sport and Recreation Facilities Fund applications to the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries for the 2020/21 funding round with the following assessment, project rating and prioritisation, noting a total grant amount sought of $790,667:

Project

Assessment

Project Rating

Priority

PR-2990 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building Design and Construction

Satisfactory

Well planned and needed by the municipality

1

PR-4214 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Installation

Satisfactory

Well planned and needed by the municipality

2

PR-4213 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Installation

Satisfactory

Well planned and needed by the municipality

3

2.       NOTES that a further report will be presented to Council in March 2020 advising the outcomes of all Community Sport and Recreation Facility Fund applications for the 2020/21 funding round and related funding implications for the City’s Long Term Financial Management Plan.

Detail

Administration has received advice from DLGSCI in regards to the outcomes of the 2019 CSRFF grant round, with the results being as follows:

 

Project

Project Cost

CSRFF Requested

CSRFF Approved

(2019/20)

PR-4213 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$373,000

$115,000

$0

PR-4214 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$399,000

$120,000

$0

PR-2990 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building

$1,667,000

$555,667

$400,000

Total

$2,439,000

$790,667

$400,000

 

A summary of each project in respect to project status, impact of the funding outcome and recommended action is as follows:

 

PR-2967 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

 

Unsuccessful for CSRFF and a budget adjustment for an additional $115,000 in municipal funds will be required for the project to continue. Concept plan and initial costings have been completed in the 2019/20 year, with construction proposed to occur in the 2020/21 financial year.

 

PR-2792 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

 

Unsuccessful for CSRFF and a budget adjustment for an additional $120,000 in municipal funds will be required for the project to continue. Concept plan and initial costings have been completed in the 2019/20 year, with construction proposed to occur in the 2020/21 financial year.

 

PR-4156 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building Design and Construction

 

Successful with a CSRFF grant of $400,000 (grant application was for $555,667).  As a result a budget adjustment for an additional $155,667 in municipal funds will be required for the project to continue. Concept plan and initial costings have been completed in the 2018/19 year, with construction proposed in the 2020/21 financial year.

Consultation

Consultation has been ongoing with the relevant stakeholders/sporting clubs to ensure they are kept updated with the progress of the projects. Future project specific consultation will be undertaken as per the City’s Community Engagement Policy.

Comment

The City has been successful in obtaining $400,000 in funding requested from the 2019 CSRFF grant round. The remaining projects that were unsuccessful are still recognised as needed by the community.  It is acknowledged that a review of funding capacity through the budget will be required and may impact on project schedules.

Statutory Compliance

Nil

 

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.1  Create opportunities that encourage community wellbeing and active and healthy lifestyles

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-G09 Long Term Financial Planning

Low

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

ST-S23 Stakeholder relationships

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Chief Executive Officer

Manage

The above risk/s relating to the issue contained within this report have been identified and considered within the City’s Corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

Nil

Financial Implications

The projects are currently listed within the Long Term Financial Plan as follows:

 

Description

Municipal (3)

Cont.

CSRFF Funds (2)

Reserve

Total Cost (1)

PR-4213 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$228,000

$0

$115,000

$0

$343,000

PR-4214 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$248,000

$0

$120,000

$0

$368,000

PR-4156 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building

$1,333,000(4)

$0

$400,000

$165,000

$1,898,000(4)

 

Notes:

(1) Total project cost estimate.

(2) CSRFF grant amount sought based on eligible project costs.

(3) Municipal contribution being two thirds of the total cost.

(4) Leatherback Park SAB budget allocation has been adjusted as part of the review process.

 

As not all of the projects were successful in securing funding there exists a funding shortfall for the 2020/21 financial year as follows:


 

 

Project

Grant Requested

Grant Award

2020/21

Shortfall

PR-4213 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$115,000

$0

$115,000

PR-4214 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$120,000

$0

$120,000

PR-2990 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building

$555,667(4)

$400,000

$155,667

TOTAL

$390,667

 

As a result, this report will note that a further review of funding capacity through the development of the 2020/21 budget will be required.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       NOTES the outcome of the City of Wanneroo's Community Sport and Recreation Facilities Fund applications for the 2019 funding round resulting in the budget shortfall as follows:

Project

Grant Requested

Grant Award

2020/21

Shortfall

PR-4213 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$115,000

$0

$115,000

PR-4214 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

$120,000

$0

$120,000

PR-4156 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building

$555,667

$400,000

$155,667

TOTAL

$390,667

2.       NOTES that the following projects are still considered to be needed by the community, however will be subject to a review of funding capacity through the 2019/20 budget process (based on the prioritisation identified below), which may result in revised delivery timeframes:

Project

Priority

2020/21

PR-2990 Leatherback Park Sports Amenities Building Design and Construction

1

$155,667

PR-4213 Ferrara Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

2

$115,000

PR-4214 Paloma Park Sports Floodlighting Upgrades

3

$120,000

3.       REQUESTS that the Mayor write to the Minister for Sport and Recreation seeking an increase in the allocation for the CSRFF Fund and the establishment of a separate funding allocation, available to Local Government for the development of regional sport and recreation infrastructure.

 

 

 

Attachments: Nil


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                              189

3.12  Hinckley Park, Hocking - Outcomes of Community Consultation

File Ref:                                              32950 – 20/21656

Responsible Officer:                           Director Community and Place

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       7  

Previous Items:                                   CP02-12/19 - Hinckley Park - Passive Park Development and Concept Design - Ordinary Council - 10 Dec 2019

 

Issue

To consider the proposed concept plan for the development of Hinckley Park, Hocking and related community engagement outcomes.

Background

Hinckley Park is situated at 14 & 16 Hinckley Parkway and 17 Copenhagen Drive, Hocking Attachment 1.  These are known as Lots 93, 300 and 8002 respectively and together are 4.1ha public open space. Under the Local Planning Policy 4.3 the classification of this park is a Neighbourhood Recreation Park and is Crown Land under City management. 

 

There are no existing amenities on site with the exception of a small playground on Lot 93 and a set of goals on Lot 300.  A GIS investigation indicates the following:

 

Item

Current Status

Park Size / Hierarchy

4.1 ha / Neighbourhood Passive Park

Reserve No.

47202, 49443

Lot No.

93, 300 & 8002

Property Type

Public recreation

Ownership

Crown Land – City of Wanneroo managed

Aboriginal Sites

None listed on GIS

Bush Forever

None listed on GIS.

 

At its meeting held of 10 December 2019, Council considered report CP02-12/19 Hinckley Park – Passive Park Development and Concept Design and resolved the following:

 

“That Council:-

1.       ENDORSES for the purposes of community engagement, the Hinckley Park Concept Plan, as shown in Attachment 2 of this report;

2.       NOTES that the Hinckley Park Concept Plan will be released for a period of community engagement from 13 January  until 7 February 2020, with the outcome to be reported to Council at its meeting held in March 2020; and

3.       NOTES the revised total project cost of $1,397,727 and that an additional sum of $396,227 will be sought as a part of the 2020/21 budget process.”


 

As noted in the previous report the closest parks to Hinckley Park are:

 

Park

Size

Proximity

Features

Covent Park, Pearsall

3.3ha

380 metres south

Medium combination unit, swings, BBQ and seating

Bembridge Park, Hocking

4.9ha

790 metres east

Large combination unit, sporting goals and seating

Chesterfield Park, Hocking

4.8ha

696 metres north

Medium combination unit, sporting goals, BBQ and seating

 

It should also be noted that Lot 300 has now been transferred to the City.

Detail

Administration prepared the concept design Attachment 2 for consideration by the community, which included the following key elements:

 

·        Nature play areas that have been placed within a children’s bike circuit;

·        3 on 3 basketball court;

·        Embankment slide and rock wall that makes use of the topography at the edge of the park;

·        Turf kick about space;

·        Traditional play space with rubber softball and shade sails; and

·        BBQ and Picnic Shelters.

 

Some existing areas of turf have been re-configured within the draft concept plan to better utilise the space and to create a reasonable sized area for a kick about space.  The remaining area of 2.8 ha consists of the above elements and landscaping.

 

Proposed Schedule

 

The proposed schedule for the project is as per the following:

 

Task

Timeframe

Community Engagement

January 2020 – February 2020

Report to Council – Concept approval and consultation outcomes

March 2020

Detail Design

April – June 2020

RFT for Construction

July – August 2020

Report to Council – Tender Outcome

August – September 2020

Construction

October 2020 – April 2021

 

The project is currently planned to be developed as one stage and an allowance of 22 weeks has been made for the construction period.  This is taking into account contractor downtime over the school holidays during December 2020 and January 2021.

Consultation

The consultation process has been undertaken in line with the City’s Community Engagement Policy. Community consultation was conducted for a period of four weeks from 13 January to 7 February 2020 and included the following consultation strategy:

 

·        Distribution of an information letter Attachment 3 and the concept plan illustrating the design to 1,120 residents and landowners within 400m of the Park;

 

·        Inclusion of the concept design and online survey link on the City’s website and advice that a hard copy plan and survey Attachment 4 could be sent directly;

 

·        Onsite signage Attachment 5 advertising the community consultation period with the concept design and information on how to make comment on the design.

 

Public Comment Outcomes

 

At the close of the community consultation period, Administration received a total of 103 responses to the survey, which is a return rate of approximately 9.2%.  Of these responses, two (2%) respondents did not support the park, while 48 (46.6%) support the park as depicted within the concept plan and 52 (50.5%) supported the park with some changes. One survey was incomplete.

 

The community were asked to rate in order of preference (1 being most important – 6 being least important) what part of the park they would use the most.  The options were:

 

·        Children’s bike circuit;

·        3 on 3 basketball court;

·        Nature play elements;

·        Embankment slide;

·        Turd kick about space; and

·        BBQ & Shelters.

 

The top three number one ranked items were:

 

·        Nature Play elements – 25;

·        Children’s Bike circuit – 23; and

·        BBQ & Shelters – 21.

 

Some of the reasons given in support of the above rankings are shown below with a full list detailed on Attachment 6:

 

·        “My children are at the age where they love to scooter and bike and kick the footy.

·        We are very excited! Love the plan.

·        I CANNOT wait to see this development finished. We have been waiting a long time for it and the kids are very excited.

·        As a young family building their first home on Memphis ridge, this park would be used almost daily and add value to our household and the area.

·        More playgrounds would be beneficial for the demographic of the local residents.”

 

Those residents who did not support the proposed development were of the view that:

 

·        The funds could be better spent on assisting the homeless and elderly within the community and improving road markings on local streets; and

·        There are other parks within Hocking which are underutilised and more toilet facilities required on parks. 

 

Residents were also asked how often they would use the park once it was completed. The results to this question have been summarised in the table below;

 

Frequency

No.

Daily

26

Fortnightly

6

Weekly

35

Monthly

10

More than once a week

14

Less than once a month

5

Did not answer

7

 

Administration sought to capture other requirements that the community were seeking when developing this park. The main requests that the community would like to see included additional parking, fitness equipment, toilets and a secured dog area.  Key comments include the following:

 

·        Would be great to include adult exercise equipment;

·        Separate dog fenced play area so kids can play without having to deal with dogs on the loose when playing;

·        Would love to see some more parking implemented, especially if it’s parallel around the perimeter. Would also be great if the trees planned don’t obstruct our lovely view of the city;

·        Pia’s place in Whiteman Park is a great example of an inclusive playground/park for all children including people with all disabilities;

·        Multiple bbq’s would be good. If the park is dog friendly or has a dog friendly area.     Getting some gym equipment around like some parks do would be awesome;

·        I would like to think that ample roadside parking would be provided along with toilet facilities.  Oh and can you hurry this along please.

 

A full list of comments is detailed at Attachment 7.

Comment

In considering the responses noted above, the following advice is provided:

 

Comment

Response

Inclusion of toilets and additional parking

Administration acknowledges that these facilities may be required and is able to investigate design and costs for a universal access toilet and additional car parking at a future point in time. 

Goals

There are currently goals on the existing southern side of the park.  These will be moved within the detail design and included on the turf space during construction.

Dog park

There is no designated dog exercise area for this park.  Dogs are permitted on public open space however must be kept under effective control at all times.  Edgar Griffiths Dog Park has recently opened to the public and is 5kms north of Hinckley Park, noting that Kingsway Dog Park is 5 kms south.

Additional BBQ’s & Fitness Equipment

There is no requirement under the City’s current Local Planning Policy 4.3 – Public Open Space to include additional BBQ’s or fitness equipment.

Seating

There will be an additional six benches included in the detail design phase that were not shown on the concept plan.

Drink Fountain

This will be included in the final detailed plan for the park.

 

There are nine car parking spaces along Copenhagen Drive and one on Moscow Retreat. If the park proves to be a popular destination park, then additional parking may be required.  A preliminary investigation has identified Lot 8002 which is the corner of Bonython Avenue and Copenhagen Drive as a possible location for toilet facilities and car parking however this would require further consultation with residents adjacent to the park.  Service locations and feasibility are not yet known however once this work is completed, could be included in the City’s LTFP.

Statutory Compliance

The City will be required to secure the necessary development approvals prior to the commencement of construction.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “1     Society

1.1    Healthy and Active People

1.1.1  Create opportunities that encourage community wellbeing and active and healthy lifestyles

Risk Management Considerations

ST-S23 Stakeholder Relationships

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Leadership Team

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O20 Productive Communities

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Community and Place

Manage

 

Risk Title

Risk Rating

CO-O17 Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Manage

 

The above risks relating to the issue contained within this report have been identified and considered within the City’s Strategic and Corporate risk registers. Action plans have been developed to manage these risks to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

The City's Local Planning Policy 4.3 Public Open Space was used as the guiding framework for the development of the concept design. The community consultation process was undertaken as per the City’s Community Engagement Policy.

 

The design of the proposed park development has also taken into account the City’s Access and Inclusion Plan.

Financial Implications

Under PR-4172, a budget of $25,750 was allocated in 2018/19 and $51,500 was allocated in 2019/20 to develop and complete a design for Hinckley Park, Hocking.  A further $1,346,227 is proposed for the construction of Hinckley Park as part of the draft 2020/21 budget.

Voting Requirements

Simple Majority

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:-

1.       ENDORSES the Hinckley Park Concept Plan, as shown within Attachment 2;

2.       NOTES that a budget of $1,346,227 for the construction of Hinckley Park has been listed for consideration in the draft 2020/21 budget;

3.       NOTES that Administration will investigate car parking options and toilet facilities for inclusion in the City’s Long Term Financial Plan;

4.       NOTES that construction of the proposed development is planned to commence in October 2020 and be concluded by April 2021; and

5.       RECOGNISES and THANKS the community for its involvement in the community consultation component of the project.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Location Plan - Hinckley Park, Hocking

19/401596

 

2.

Hinckley Park Concept Plan - Consultation Final

19/419435

Minuted

3.

Community Consultation Letter - Hinckley Park - Development - December 2019

20/55903

 

4.

Hinckley Park Development - Public Comment Form

19/480999

 

5.

Onsite - Hinckley Park Signage

20/55925

 

6.

Element ratings - order of preference – Hinckley Park Concept Plan

20/55401

 

7.

Other comments - Hinckley Park

20/55957

 

 

 

 


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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                              220

 

Corporate Strategy & Performance

Business & Finance

3.13  Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 January 2020

File Ref:                                              30724V05 – 20/45295

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       6         

 

Issue

To consider the Financial Activity Statement for the period ended 31 January 2020.

Background

In accordance with Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, the Financial Activity Statement has been prepared in compliance with the following:

“Regulation 34(1) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to prepare a statement of financial activity each month, presented according to nature and type, by program, or by business unit. For the 2019/20 financial year the statement of financial activity will be presented by nature and type.

Regulation 34(5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996, which requires a local government to adopt a percentage or value, calculated in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, to be used in statements of financial activity for reporting material variances. For the 2019/20 financial year 10% and a value greater than $100,000 will be used for the reporting of variances.”

Detail

Council adopted the Annual Budget for the 2019-20 financial year on 28 June 2019 (SCS01-06/19). The figures in this report are compared to the Adopted Budget.

 

The Mid Year Review (MYR) was conducted in January and adopted by Council on 10 February 2020. The Revised Budget will reflect the MYR adjustments from February 2020.

Comments Month-to-Date

The Financial Activity Statement report for the month of January 2020 shows an overall unfavourable variance from Operations before Other Revenue & Expenses of $1.4m.

 

The unfavourable variance is due to lower Rates, Interest Earnings and accruals in Employment Costs expenses.

Comments Year-to-Date

The Financial Activity Statement report for the year-to-date of January 2020 shows an overall favourable variance from Operations before Other Revenue & Expenses of $2.7m.

 

The favourable variance is due to underspend in Employment Costs and Materials and Contracts expenses offset by lower Rates, Interest Income and Fees & Charges.

 

 

Results from Operations

 

 

 

Capital Program

 

 

Overall Comments on Year-to-Date (YTD) Figures

Results from Operations

 

 

Capital Program

 

 

Investment Portfolio Performance

 

 


 

Detailed Analysis of Statement of Comprehensive Income (Attachment 1)

Comments relating to the Statement of Comprehensive Income are provided under the following two sections:

a)         Current month comparison of Actuals to Budgets; and

b)         Year to date of Actuals to Budgets

 

where the variance is higher than reporting threshold or item of interest to Council.

 

 

 

Revenues

Note 1        Rates

Month to Date - (Actual $212k, Revised Budget $1.2m)

The variance is unfavourable by $988k relates to reduction in generating Interim Rates due to successful objections to valuations from Developers and Residential Properties.

Year to Date - (Actual $133.4m, Revised Budget $134.9m)

The variance is unfavourable by $1.4m as noted above but within the reporting threshold.

Note 2        Fees and Charges

Month to Date - (Actual $1.4m, Revised Budget $1.4m)

The variance is unfavourable by $89k relates to reduced facility booking fees income, application licence permit fee income offset by increased user entry fees for Aquamotion swim school and membership.

 

 Year to Date - (Actual $39.9m, Revised Budget $40.1m)

The variance is unfavourable by $263k with the main activities noted above resulting in the variance.

 

 

 

 

Note 3        Interest Earnings

Month to Date - (Actual $641k, Revised Budget $752k)

The unfavourable variance of $111k for the month is attributable to lower portfolio return due to historically low Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) Cash Rate (currently at 0.75%).

Year to Date - (Actual $5.5m, Revised Budget $5.6m)

The unfavourable variance of $127k is due to the reason noted above.

Expenses

Note 4        Employee Costs

Month to Date - (Actual $7.1m, Revised Budget $6.8m)

The unfavourable variance of $298k for the month is mainly attributable to catch up accrual in workers compensation costing offset by staff vacancies.

Year to Date - (Actual $43.2m, Revised Budget $45.3m)

The favourable variance of $2.0m mainly attributable to staff vacancies not been filled and $244k related to underspent corporate training.

Note 5        Materials and Contracts

Month to Date - (Actual $5.2m, Revised Budget $5.2m)

The variance is unfavourable by $12k but within the reporting threshold.

 

 

Year to Date - (Actual $36.6, Revised Budget $38.6m)

The favourable variance of $2.0m mainly relates to:

·        Lower consulting fees of $1.0m due to underspend on various projects;

·        Lower refuse removal expenses of $337k due to lower than expected collection of waste tonnage;

·        Lower material expenses of $181k from various operational areas;

·        Lower audit fee expenses of $109k due to timing of billing;

·        Lower lease/rental fee expenses of $64k mainly due to lower than expected expenses for  Yanchep Beach JV;

·        Lower membership subscription expenses of $62k for various areas;

·        Lower software licence expenses of $61k;

·        Lower fuel and oil expenses of $46k;

·        Lower sponsorship fee of $43k; and

·        Lower postage expenses of $37k.

Note 6        Insurance

Month to Date - (Actual $93k, Revised Budget $125k)

The favourable variance of $31k reflects improved claims experience.

Year to Date - (Actual $678k, Revised Budget $887k)

The favourable variance of $208k reflects improved claims experience.


 

Other Revenue & Expenses

Note 7        Non-Operating Grants, Subsidies & Contributions

Month to Date – (Actual $2.2m, Revised Budget $1.6m)

The variance is favourable by $537k due to earlier receipt of Main Roads Western Australia (MRWA) road grants for service relocation on Marmion Avenue.  

Year to Date – (Actual $9.4m, Revised Budget $7.2m)

The favourable variance of $2.2m year to date reflects the early recognition of restricted cash to income.

Note 8        Contributed Physical Assets

Month to Date – (Actual $0, Revised Budget $1.4m)

The unfavourable variance of $1.4m is due to the phasing of the Budget. The anticipated asset handover was budgeted for January 2020. However the actual asset recognition is recorded as and when assets are handed over to the City.

Year to Date – (Actual $5.2m, Revised Budget $9.5m)

The unfavourable variance is due to lower than anticipated level of asset handover from developers.

Note 9-10   Profit / Loss on Asset Disposals

Month to Date – (Combined Actual $80k, Combined Revised Budget $15k)

The favourable variance is a result of higher numbers of lots sales relating to Tamala Park Regional Council (TPRC) than anticipated.

Year to Date – (Combined Actual $433k, Combined Revised Budget $101k)

The favourable variance relates to Tamala Park Regional Council (TPRC) lot sales as explained above.

Note 11      Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Revenues

Month to Date – (Actual $1.4m, Revised Budget $1.9m)

The unfavourable result is due to delay in receipt of headworks levy for Yanchep/Two Rocks community facilities of $250k, Cell 2 for $195k, Cell 6 for $120k and offset by receipt of headworks for Cell 9 for $159k.

Year to Date – (Actual $7.6m, Revised Budget $7.7m)

The unfavourable variance of $133k relates to under receipt of headworks levy for Cell 1,4 and 8.

Note 12      Town Planning Scheme (TPS) Expenses

Month to Date – (Actual $81k, Revised Budget $188k)

The favourable result relates to delay in contract expenses for Cell 6 offsets by unbudgeted legal expenses for Cell 4, 5 and 6.


 

Year to Date – (Actual $5.1m, Revised Budget $2.9m)

The unfavourable result is due to land acquisition for Cell 9 for $3.2m which offsets by deferral in contract expense for Woodvale Structure Plan by $600k, Cell 8 by $289k, Cell 9 by $150k and Cell 6 by $143k.

Statement of Financial Position (Attachment 2)

 

Note 1 - Net Current Assets

When compared to the opening position at 30 June 2019 Net Current Assets have increased by $43.4m which is predominately due to the impact of 2019/20 Rates and Waste Service Fees levied.

Within the Current Assets, Current Receivables of $43.3m are mainly comprised of collectable Rates and Waste Service Fees debtors of $37.0m and Emergency Services Levy of $1.7m, with the remaining balance attributed to General Debtors of $4.6m.

Note 2 - Non-Current Assets

Non-Current Assets as at 31 January 2020 have increased by $23.9m from 30 June 2019 Actuals. The movement is due to increase in Work in Progress of $47.5m partially offset by accumulated depreciation of $23.9m (estimated).

Note 3 - Non-Current Liabilities

Non-Current Liabilities as at 31 January 2020 have increased by $5.6m due to change in the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) Standard 15 for Revenue from Contracts. The revised AASB 15 requires the City to recognise Grants and Contributions as liability when performance obligations have are not been met.

The existing loan with the Western Australia Treasury Corporation remains unchanged making up 81% of total Non-Current Liabilities.

Financial Performance Indicators

The table below presents data on relevant financial ratios, comparing the minimum standard expected as per the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries (DLGSCI) status at the beginning of the financial year, and year to date figures (where relevant).

A green highlight is used where the minimum standard is met or exceeded. Highlighted in red are below the standard for financial year end 30 June 2019.

DLGSCI - Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

The following comments with regard to Ratios relates to the benchmarks not met for the period 30 June 2019.

Note 1 - Current Ratio

The Standard was not met primarily as a result of the internal restrictions of municipal funds. Most of the municipal funds are kept in special purpose cash backed Reserves.

Note 2 – Asset Sustainability Ratio

The DLGSCI Asset Management Framework and Guidelines publication provides the following explanation in respect to the Asset Sustainability Ratio (ASR):

"If capital expenditure on renewing or replacing assets is at least equal to depreciation on average over time, then the local government is ensuring the value of its existing stock of physical assets is maintained. If capital expenditure on existing assets is less than depreciation then, unless a local government’s overall asset stock is relatively new, it is likely that it is underspending on renewal or replacement."

A large percentage of the City's assets are in new to very good condition with approximately 85% of the total asset base at or below condition 2 (a rating of ‘0’ represents a new asset and a ‘10’ represents an asset that has failed). Less than 1% of the asset base is at or above condition 8, which represents assets that require intervention.

 

With the City's current mix of old and new assets and continued high growth, a lower than average ASR is expected, and the current condition of assets and level of renewal expenditure confirms this position. As the stock ages and renewal expenditure incrementally increases the ratio should increase, however continued growth may keep it relatively lower than the industry standard.

 

Taking a long term outlook, the level of asset stock and renewal demand necessitates the development of strategies to address the future impact and ensure that the City can continue to grow and maintain its assets in a financially sustainable manner. Given that renewal expenditure is lower than the depreciation being charged and that certain years’ experience significant spikes in demand, a specific Asset Renewal Reserve has been established.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Works Program

The current status of the Capital Works Program is summarised by Sub-Program in the table below:

 

During January 2020 $3.8m was spent. Details of significant expenditure for the month are included in Attachment 3. As at 31 January 2020 the City has spent $42.9m, which represents 43.4% of the $98.8m Capital Works Budget.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The City forecasts spend of $89,907,872 which represents 99% of the 2019/20 revised Capital Works Budget (Which includes the MYR adjustments) including contingencies and savings.

 

To further expand on the Capital Works Program information above, updates in key capital projects are selected to be specifically reported on, is provided in the Top Capital Projects attachment to this report (Attachment 4).

 

Capital Changes

 

The following changes are proposed to be made to the 2019/20 Capital Works budget.

 

PR-4078 Kingsway Aquatic Play Space – The City has received funding of $300,000 from the Federal Government to assist with construction. This has resulted in a saving to the City of $270,000 in Municipal Funds, and offsets the additional costs associated with improvements required to the splash pad identified through early operations.

 

PR-4108 Wanneroo City Soccer New Change Rooms – The City has received funding of $400,000 from the Federal Government to assist with construction. This has resulted in a direct saving to the City of $350,000 in Municipal Funds, and offsets the increased cost in relation to gas connection to the site.

PR-4034 Hudson Park, Upgrade Dennis Cooley Pavilion – During construction of the building extension unexpected issues relating to the existing building were identified which deemed the building to be structurally unsound; hence requiring its reconstruction. These are latent conditions that were not found in pre-construction planning investigations.

Additional $190,000 is required for demolition and re-builds works of the existing building associated with structural integrity issues. It is proposed that these funds are sourced from Municipal Fund.


 

Investment Portfolio (Attachment 5)

In accordance with the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 (and per the City’s Investment Policy), the City invests solely in Authorised Deposit taking Institutions (ADIs):

At the end of January 2020, the City held an investment portfolio (cash & cash equivalents) of $411.2m (Face Value), equating to $415.4m inclusive of accrued interest.  The City’s year to date investment portfolio return has exceeded the UBS Australia Bank Bill rate index benchmark by 0.51% pa (1.91% pa vs. 1.40% pa), however it is noted that Interest Earnings were budgeted at a 2.25% yield.

Rate Setting Statement (Attachment 6)

The Rate Setting Statement represents a composite view of the finances of the City, identifying the movement in the Surplus/ (Deficit) based on the Revenues (excluding Rates), Expenses, Capital Works and Funding Movements, resulting in the Rating Income required.  It is noted that the closing Surplus/ (Deficit) will balance to the reconciliation of Net Current Assets Surplus/ (Deficit) Carried Forward (detailed below):

*The change in the AASB Standard 15 has resulted in the City now recognising Grants and Contributions received as a liability when performance obligations have not been met.

Consultation

This document has been prepared in consultation with Responsible Officers for review and analysis.

Comment

In reference to Statement of Comprehensive Income in the report, the following colours have been used to categorise three levels of variance:

Revenues:

·        Green > 0%;

·        Amber -0% to -10%; and

·        Red < -10%.

Expenses:

·        Green > 0%;

·        Amber -0% to -10%; and

·        Red < -10%.

Statutory Compliance

This monthly financial report complies with Section 6.4 of the Act and Regulations 34 (5) of the Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996.

Strategic Implications

The proposal aligns with the following objective within the Strategic Community Plan 2017 – 2027:

 “4     Civic Leadership

4.2    Good Governance

4.2.2  Provide responsible resource and planning management which recognises our significant future growth

Risk Management Considerations

Risk Title

Risk Rating

Financial Management

Moderate

Accountability

Action Planning Option

Executive Management Team

Manage

 

The above risk relating to the issue contained within this report has been identified and considered within the City’s corporate risk register.  Action plans have been developed to manage this risk to support existing management systems.

Policy Implications

·        Accounting Policy;

·        Strategic Budget Policy; and

·        Investment Policy.

Financial Implications

As outlined in the report and detailed in Attachments 1 to 6.

Voting Requirements

Absolute Majority

 

Recommendation

That  Council:

1.       RECEIVES the Financial Activity Statement and commentaries on variances year to date Budget for the period ended 31 January 2020 consisting of:

a)      January 2020 year to date Actuals;

b)      January 2020 year to date Statement of Financial Position and Net Current Assets; and

c)      January 2020 year to date Material Financial Variance Notes.

 

2.       APPROVES BY ABSOLUTE MAJORITY the following changes to the 2019/20 Capital Work Budget:

Number

From

To

Amount

Description

PR-4078

Federal Gov’t Grant

PR-4078 Kingsway Aquatic Play Space

$300,000

Federal Grant received

PR-4078

PR-4078 Kingsway Aquatic Play Space

Municipal Fund

$270,000

Saving due to receipt of Grant

PR-4108

Federal Gov’t Grant

PR-4108 Wanneroo City Soccer New Change Rooms

$400,000

Federal Grant received

PR-4108

PR-4108 Wanneroo City Soccer New Change Rooms

Municipal Fund

$350,000

Saving due to receipt of Grant

PR-4034

Municipal Fund

PR-4034 Hudson Park, Upgrade Dennis Cooley Pavilion

$190,000

Demolition and re-build works of the existing building

 

 

 

Attachments:

1.

Statement of Comprehensive Income January 2020

20/48340

Minuted

2.

Statement of Financial Position January 2020

20/63343

Minuted

3.

Significant Capital Expenditure January 2020

20/48320

Minuted

4.

Top Projects 2019-20 January 2020

16/151914[v46]

Minuted

5.

Investment Report January 2020

20/48377

Minuted

6.

Rate Setting Statement January 2020

20/63337

Minuted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                              221

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                                                                              231

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CITY OF WANNEROO Agenda OF Elected Members' Briefing Session 03 March, 2020                              294

 

Transactional Finance

3.14  Warrant of Payments for the Period to 31 January 2020

File Ref:                                              1859V02 – 20/42667

Responsible Officer:                           Director Corporate Strategy & Performance

Disclosure of Interest:                         Nil

Attachments:                                       Nil       

 

Issue

Presentation to Council of a list of accounts paid for the month of January 2020, including a statement as to the total amounts outstanding at the end of the month.

Background

Local Governments are required each month to prepare a list of accounts paid for that month and submit the list to the next practicable Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

In addition, it must record all other outstanding accounts and include that amount with the list to be presented.  The list of accounts paid and the total of outstanding accounts must be recorded in the minutes of Council meeting.

Detail

The following is the Summary of Accounts paid in January 2020:

 

Funds

Vouchers

Amount

Director Corporate Services Advance A/C

Accounts Paid – January 2020

   Cheque Numbers

   EFT Document Numbers

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

Manual Journal

Less Cancelled Cheques

Town Planning Scheme

RECOUP FROM MUNICIPAL FUND

 

 

118727 - 119005

3716 - 3740

 

 

$1,962,561.11

$13,853,765.21

$15,816,326.32

 

$2,172.50

($20,609.28)

($42,126.96)

$15,755,762.58

Municipal Fund – Bank A/C

Accounts Paid – January 2020

 

Recoup to Director Corporate Services Advance A/C

Direct Payments

Payroll – Direct Debits

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

 

 

 

$15,755,762.58

$77,118.73

$3,596,812.64

$19,429,693.95

Town Planning Scheme

Accounts Paid – January 2020

                           Cell 1

                           Cell 2

                           Cell 3

                           Cell 4

                           Cell 5

                           Cell 6

                           Cell 7

                           Cell 8

                           Cell 9

TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAID

 

 

 

 

$1,192.33

($2,107.67)